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Renters vs. homeowners: Political divide as wide as their affordability gaps

Renters are more worried than homeowners about California’s housing woes.

You do not have to be a pollster to figure this out. But the gap revealed in a new survey from the Public Policy Institute of California shows key differences.

For example, the survey of 1,702 California adults shows 13 percent of renters say real estate costs were their top California concern. Just 7 percent of homeowners felt the same way. One thing homeowners typically possess that renters don’t — the relative certainty of what the roof over your head will cost.

I know California renters tend to be younger, make less money and are more financially crunched than homeowners. And the survey says homeowners lean more conservatively than renters — 38 percent vs. 29 percent. But since this state is only slightly tilted toward homeowners, demographically speaking, these renter sentiments — especially on business-related issues — cannot be ignored.

Please note there was not total disagreement in the poll. Jobs and the economy were cited as the top issues to tackle in the state for renters and homeowners alike.

But mixed dollars-and-cents anxieties showed up when pollsters were asked about California economic prospects 12 months out. Renters were cautious, with only a slim difference between those who saw “good times” ahead vs. “bad times” — 48 percent optimistic vs. 42 percent pessimistic. Owners were an enthusiastic group: 53 percent were upbeat vs. 37 percent downbeat.

There was, however, significant disagreement on the importance of immigration issues: 18 percent of homeowners listed it as their top concern vs. 13 percent of renters. And 26 percent of homeowners told pollsters that immigrants are a burden to society vs. 14 percent of renters.

It may be that renters show more sympathy to immigrants — legal or otherwise — because they are more likely to be immigrants themselves or they empathize on an economic level.

Now the institute’s timing for the poll was clearly political with a state primary ahead. Renter and homeowner views differed here, too.

Gov. Jerry Brown got high grades from the tenant crowd: 45 percent favorable vs. 25 percent unfavorable. More homeowners like Brown — 51 percent approval — than owners who didn’t like the governor — 38 percent disapproval.

President Donald Trump wasn’t popular, but the scorn varied as shown by the spread between “favorable” impressions and “unfavorable.”

For renters, 23 percent liked Trump vs. 69 percent who disliked him. That’s a 46 percentage point difference in favorability. Homeowners weren’t too pleased either, but less dramatically so: 38 percent favorable vs. 56 percent unfavorable, an 18 percentage-point gap.

Both groups didn’t care for their lawmakers, especially the D.C. version, with owners a bit more passionate with their disdain.

The Sacramento legislature drew “disapprove” marks from 45 percent of homeowners and 33 percent of renters. Congressional disapproval was 71 percent among homeowners and 62 percent of renters.

That brings us to the upcoming political horse races.

When the pollsters asked likely voters about their primary ballot-box preferences, there was not much difference in top choices in the big statewide races: two Democrats, Gavin Newsom for governor and incumbent Diane Feinstein for U.S. senator.

But the No. 2 preference for governor — who’ll run against the top vote-getter come November — varied: Republican John Cox’s got the homeowners’ nod and Democrat Antonio Villaraigosa from renters.

Perhaps the most intriguing political battles of the year are local races for Congress. And another political divide emerges. Renters decidedly want a Democrat going to the House of representatives while homeowners are essentially a “toss-up” between the two parties.

Please think ahead, too. This renter-homeowner schism isn’t going away any year soon. And it could shift the statewide balance of power on key economic issues — especially housing ones, like rental control or the future of Prop. 13.

DID YOU SEE?

California ranked as nation’s 5th fastest-growing economy

Southern California pay hits record highs as workers get more hours

California’s record low unemployment is far from perfect

Southern California homeownership on the rise, but still lags nation

California critic’s ultimate critique: He moved to Pennsylvania!

Southern California auto sales drop! Dip from peak or warning signal?

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/27/renters-vs-homeowners-political-divide-as-wide-as-their-affordability-gaps/

Shorthanded LAFC salvages tie with D.C. United

Down a man for the entire the second half, the Los Angeles Football Club salvaged a 1-1 draw at home against last-place Eastern Conference side D.C. United.

LAFC captain Laurent Ciman and star forward Carlos Vela made their final starts prior to joining their respective World Cup camps with Belgium and Mexico hoping to leave their teammates in great shape going into the month of June.

“I think we should taken three points,” LAFC coach Bob Bradley said. “But we didn’t manage the end of the first half and we have to deal with things.

Uruguayan forward Diego Rossi put LAFC up 1-0, guiding a shot past goalkeeper David Ousted in the 39th minute.

The tightly-knit sequence came when midfielders Benny Feilhaber and Mark-Anthony Kaye created enough space inside a crowded D.C. box before the 20-year-old Rossi finished his fifth goal of the season.

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LAFC defender Dejan Jakovic was shown a straight red card after a hard tackle on Paul Arriola during stoppage time of the first half, which has been largely dominated by the home side. Hounded by players on both sides throughout the choppy contest, referee Ismail Elfath issued five cards: Jakovic’s red and four yellows on D.C.

United stepped onto the Banc of California Stadium pitch midway through an arduous eight-game trip while it awaits the opening of their new stadium, Audi Field, on July 14. The four-time MLS champions sought their second road win of the season after handling the flagging San Jose Earthquakes 3-1 last weekend, however they were unable to find a go-ahead goal.

United’s equalizer arrived in the 84th minute when Joseph Mora, who replaced Oniel Fisher with half an hour remaining in the match, crossed the ball from one side of the LAFC box to the other. Arriola headed the ball back towards goal and United’s leading goal scorer, Darren Mattocks, notched his fifth of the season with a clean header past Tyler Miller and Ciman.

D.C. (2-5-3, 9 points) attempted numerous chances in the second half against an LAFC team that did not sit back defensively in an attempt to preserve its 1-0 margin. They moved to 21-11-3 (8-9-2 on the road) all-time against MLS expansion teams.

Bradley planned to build up the Black & Gold attack from the back, and the defensive unit of Ciman, Jakovic, Jordan Harvey and, in his first MLS start, Tristan Blackmon did well against the anemic D.C. United offense, allowing just one shot on target in the first 45 minutes. By the end of the game, LAFC outshot D.C., 17-13, putting six balls on target compared to the visitor’s two.

Addressing the red card along the defensive backline, Bradley swapped forward Latif Blessing for defender Joao Moutinho at the half.

In the 63rd minute, Mattocks stepped on Ciman’s foot and the defender fell face first toward the byline, his right hand inadvertently touching the ball.

Elfath relied on the video assistant referee before waving off a United penalty.

“When VAR started what they said was they only call it if it’s a clear error,” Bradley said. “And yet what happens now there are calls, the referee makes it, it’s not really a clear error, it’s a close call, and they look at it.”

Moments later, LAFC’s Harvey hit a ball in the United box off opposing midfielder Zoltan Stieber. Helfath called a penalty before going to VAR and changing the result of a play to a corner kick.

“I think there will be games like this with the new system that in many ways ruins the game,” D.C. United head coach Ben Olsen said. “But there will also be a lot of games where it makes sense.”

LAFC (6-3-3, 21 points) stays unbeaten at home as it heads to Western Conference rival Dallas next Saturday. The teams played to a 1-1 draw at the Banc of California Stadium.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/shorthanded-lafc-salvages-tie-with-d-c-united/

Clayton Kershaw could be back in Dodgers’ rotation soon

LOS ANGELES – Clayton Kershaw moved closer to rejoining the Dodgers’ starting rotation Saturday.

On the DL since May 2 with biceps tendinitis, Kershaw threw approximately 60 pitches over four simulated innings, facing Cody Bellinger, Chase Utley, Kiké Hernandez and Austin Barnes. Kershaw said he “felt good” during the 60-pitch test and “should be” ready to pitch in a game five days from now.

Whether that game will be for the Dodgers (against the Philadelphia Phillies in the homestand finale on Thursday at the earliest) or in a minor-league injury-rehabilitation assignment remains to be decided if Kershaw and Dodgers manager Dave Roberts are to be believed.

“We’ll see. I’m not sure,” Kershaw said.

“You can’t simulate a big-league game. All the things you do to prepare to pitch a big-league game, until you’re in one you really don’t know where you’re at. You do all you can to prepare but ultimately the only way to figure out if you’re ready or not is to go face guys. I don’t feel I lost a whole lot from where I was. I worked on a lot of stuff the past few weeks to try to get better, try to get healthy. I guess whenever I get to start we’ll see.”

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Roberts called the sim game “a positive in the sense that from what I could tell he felt good afterward.” Kershaw will throw another bullpen session in two days but Roberts would not commit to a next step beyond that.

“We still have to talk through some things and just make sure it’s the right situation for Kersh,” Roberts said. “It depends on how he feels tomorrow and how things play out. But having him pitch today, feeling good coming off the mound, there were a lot of positives.”

The first thing on Kershaw’s check list Saturday was “just be healthy, I guess.” But he also acknowledged he has spent time during his DL stay working with pitching coach Rick Honeycutt on his mechanics – though he would not discuss what he was working on or what motivated what he acknowledged was a rare focus on his mechanics.

“I’ve been working on little stuff here and there,” Kershaw said. “But when you start focusing on getting hitters out, you obviously stop thinking about your mechanics and just focus on trying to get hitters out. … You never should focus on mechanics when you’re competing. That’s what the in-between (starts) is for. I’m never really been a mechanics guy. The past few weeks I’ve been working on it a little bit. It’s probably the first time that I can remember that I really focused on it. We’ll see.”

In seven starts before going on the DL, Kershaw was 1-4 with a 2.86 ERA and 1.14 WHIP – both of which would be his highest since 2010 if they hold over the full season – and seven home runs allowed.

Kershaw shares the team lead in homers allowed with Rich Hill who also threw in Saturday’s simulated game – and gave up two home runs to Hernandez. Hill threw two innings with the troublesome blister on his middle finger covered. The sim game serves to keep Hill’s arm in shape but Roberts acknowledged it tells the Dodgers little about his ability to pitch without the finger protected.

“I think he’s a ways away from that,” Roberts said.

Roberts said Hill will likely continue alternating bullpen sessions and sim games while letting the blister further heal and callous over.

PUIG SITS

During Friday’s game, the San Diego Padres scored their only run of the game when Dodgers right fielder Yasiel Puig  cut off Manuel Margot’s drive toward the right-field corner but didn’t field it cleanly. Puig was slow to pick up the ball once he bobbled it and Margot went all the way to third on the double and error. He scored from there on a ground out two batters later.

“He made a great effort play getting there and cutting the ball off,” Roberts said after the game. “But then when he didn’t come up with it he turned one sort of mistake, a physical mistake, into a mental mistake and turned that double into a triple and cost us a run.

“He’s just too good to have mental lapses like that happen. He’s too good of a player.”

Earlier this season, Roberts pulled Cody Bellinger from a game for what seemed to be a less blatant – and less costly – lack of effort. Puig was not in the starting lineup Saturday against Padres right-hander Jordan Lyles – but it was a decision unrelated to Friday’s blunder, Roberts said.

Roberts said he didn’t talk to Puig about the play – “I think he knew how I felt about it” – but acknowledged that bench coach Bob Geren did.

“He knew that was a play that shouldn’t have … turned into a guy at third base and cost us a run,” Roberts said. “Like I said last night, he’s just too good of a player to let something like that happen.”

UP NEXT

Padres TBA at Dodgers RHP Walker Buehler (2-1, 2.38 ERA), Sunday, 1:10 p.m., SportsNet LA (where available)

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/clayton-kershaw-could-be-back-in-dodgers-rotation-soon/

LoForte leads Cal State Fullerton baseball to win over Long Beach State

  • Cal State Fullerton’s Brett Borgogno (2) celebrates with Jairus Richards (32) and Jace Chamberlin after scoring past Long Beach State catcher Chris Jimenez in the sixth inning during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Cal State Fullerton’s Brett Borgogno (2) celebrates with Jairus Richards (32) and Jace Chamberlin after scoring past Long Beach State catcher Chris Jimenez in the sixth inning during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cal State Fullerton’s Andrew Quezada throws to the plate during the Titans’ 10-9 victory over Long Beach State at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Cal State Fullerton’s Andrew Quezada throws to the plate during the Titans’ 10-9 victory over Long Beach State at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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  • Cal State Fullerton’s Hank LoForte throws out Long Beach State’s Brooks Stotler during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Cal State Fullerton’s Hank LoForte throws out Long Beach State’s Brooks Stotler during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The Cal State Fullerton bench celebrates their first run against Long Beach State during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The Cal State Fullerton bench celebrates their first run against Long Beach State during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cal State Fullerton’s Hank LoForte dives for a hard hit ball against Long Beach State during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Cal State Fullerton’s Hank LoForte dives for a hard hit ball against Long Beach State during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cal State Fullerton’s Mitchell Berryhill and the ball get past the Long Beach State catcher during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Cal State Fullerton’s Mitchell Berryhill and the ball get past the Long Beach State catcher during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cal State Fullerton’s Jairus Richards scores past Long Beach State catcher Chris Jimenez during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Cal State Fullerton’s Jairus Richards scores past Long Beach State catcher Chris Jimenez during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A ball hit by Cal State Fullerton’s Hank LoForte drops past the Long Beach State outfield for an error during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    A ball hit by Cal State Fullerton’s Hank LoForte drops past the Long Beach State outfield for an error during the Titans’ 10-9 victory at Blair Field in Long Beach on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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LONG BEACH – Any team preparing a postseason scouting report on Cal State Fullerton should begin and end it with Hank LoForte.

The senior second baseman from Northern California showed a robust crowd of 3,015 at Blair Field why he has been the catalyst for the Titans, a team that started slowly in 2018 but took off to another Big West title when LoForte began a streak that will churn into June.

LoForte was 4 for 5 Saturday in the season finale between the Titans and Long Beach State, his third four-hit game of the season, and also drove in four runs as the Titans outlasted the Dirtbags in a classic rivalry roll in the brick dust, 10-9.

He singled and scored in the first, singled and drove in a run in the second, and sliced a bases-loaded triple to the wall in the sixth that capped a six-run inning and turned a 5-2 deficit into an 8-5 lead.  He singled and scored in the ninth as part of two more runs, which were needed when the Dirtbags scored four runs in the bottom of the ninth.

“This was a nice win, giving us some momentum into the tournament,’’ LoForte said. “And that last inning provided some adversity. We’re bound to run into some next weekend. It was a good end.’’

The Titans won the series, 2-1, and split their six games with Long Beach this season. The Titans are 13-3 in their last 16 games, which happens to coincide with LoForte’s current 16-game hitting streak.

LoForte began the season hitting leadoff but struggled early, hitting a little over .100 the first few weeks. He was moved around the lineup for about a month and also suffered a broken nose in a freak bat-swinging accident that forced him to play several games with a face mask.

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He returned to the leadoff spot on March 31. The Titans have gone 22-8 in their last 30 games since, with LoForte hitting .405 (56 for 138) with 11 extra base hits, 27 runs scored and 26 RBI. He has reached base in 39 consecutive games.

“We moved him around a bit and tried other guys, but we weren’t doing much,’’ Titans head coach Rick Vanderhook said. “We put him back at the top and we just took off. He knows how to hit. You only bat leadoff once a game, but he’s been a catalyst in every way, starting new rallies and driving in runs when there are men on base.’’

“I felt a lot of confidence when coach put me back in the leadoff spot,’’ LoForte said. “I just separated the first half from the second half and knew my roll.’’

The Titans (32-23, 18-6 Big West) will find out their spot in the NCAA bracket Monday morning when the field of 64 is announced. Long Beach (27-30, 12-12 Big West) finished the season with nine wins in their last 13 games and .500 in league play. At one point Long Beach was last in the league at 4-8.

LoForte singled to start the game and scored on a Ruben Cardenas single. The Dirtbags used little ball to score three runs in the bottom of the inning. Clayton Andrews walked, Brooks Stotler singled and Jarren Duran doubled to left to score Andrews. After an out, the Dirtbags put down a pair of squeeze bunts to score two more runs.

An RBI single by LoForte in the second made it 3-2. Long Beach added single runs with a Joey Sanchez RBI single in the fourth and a run without a hit in the fifth.

The game collapsed on Long Beach sixth. Shortstop Santino Rivera threw wide of first on a routine grounder to start the inning. A hit batter and singles by Daniel Cope and Mace Chamberlain got a run. Chris Rivera relieved and hit a batter and walked another to tie the game and bring up LoForte with the bases loaded.

LoForte hit a slicing fly to left center that seemed catchable. Left-fielder Tristan Mercadel and center-fielder Andrews converged, Mercadel pulling off the ball and running in front of Andrews, whose subsequent dive for the ball came up short as it rolled to the wall to give Fullerton an 8-5 lead.

The Titans added two in the ninth. The Dirtbags awoke in the bottom of the inning, getting five hits in a run of six batters against Titans closer Brett Conine, singles by Andrews, Duran and Chris Jimenez and doubles by Stotler and Mercadel to cut the margin to one.

Conine struck out Shaq Robinson and Joey Sanchez to end the game.

“It was a good game,’’ Vanderhook said. “I could have done without the bottom of the ninth.’’

Troy Buckley could have used one more hit to send the game into extra innings.

“We had some success late in the season, but today was an example of the kind of games we had early, when we’d repeat the same mistakes.’’

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/loforte-leads-cal-state-fullerton-baseball-to-win-over-long-beach-state/

Monsters, animals and barbarians at the White House gate

Donald Trump isn’t the only president I’ve heard call another human being an “animal.” Richard Nixon was the first, although he wasn’t alluding to murderous gang members from a foreign country. Nixon was talking about his predecessor in office, Lyndon Baines Johnson.

To be fair, Nixon was out of the White House then. Also, he didn’t call Johnson an animal so much as tell CNN interviewer Patrick Buchanan that Robert Caro’s new biography made LBJ look that way.  The exchange took place during a commercial break in their 1982 interview; five years ago, CNN put it on YouTube. Nixon tells Buchanan that Caro’s “terrible book” is getting rave reviews. “Unbelievable,” Nixon says. “It makes [Johnson] appear like a goddamn animal.”

After a brief pause, Nixon quips, “Of course, he was,” which makes both men laugh, before Nixon adds incongruously: “He was a man!”

In today’s world, it didn’t take 31 years for President Trump’s musings about the street gang MS-13 to make news. It didn’t take 31 seconds. Responding to a comment from Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims about California laws precluding her from calling federal immigration officials on MS-13 members, Trump let it fly:

“We have people coming into the country, or trying to come in, and we’re stopping them,” Trump said. “You wouldn’t believe how bad these people are.” He then edited himself, as it were, perhaps remembering the unsettling rhetorical tic of Barack Obama and George W. Bush, who both used the word “folks” when referring to terrorists.

“These aren’t people,” Trump said. “These are animals.”

The country’s prominent news organizations immediately tweeted out misleading headlines indicating Trump had called “immigrants” animals. The goofiest story may have been in USA Today, which asserted: “Trump’s not the first to use such rhetoric: Adolf Hitler justified the Holocaust by saying Jews weren’t people.”

Even after these news outlets were shamed into toning it down, Democrats stoked the controversy. Rep. Joe Crowley, a member of the Democratic House leadership, asserted the president “paint(s) … all immigrants with the same brush.” An odd thing to say about a man married to an immigrant, so Crowley went to his second talking point. “Calling any human being an animal, regardless of what they’re about … I find that disgusting.”

This isn’t as clever a dodge as Democrats think. Yes, Trump makes a juicy target, given the ugly way he’s previously spoken about Mexicans and Muslims. But this time, liberals are revealing their own ignorance, not Trump’s. Let’s start with MS-13, which is not simply a criminal enterprise with ruthless methods. It’s a murderous cult with a fetish for violence and a history of Satanism.

La Mara Salvatrucha, as it was originally called, took root in the rough streets of Los Angeles and initially comprised pot-smoking, heavy metal-listening Salvadorans who dabbled in devil worship. Inside the even rougher prison system of California, it took the MS-13 moniker and became more sinister. In time, its devil’s head tattoos and Satan-worshiping blood rituals would morph into ritualistic murders.

“The Beast,” an MS-13 member named Diabolical told Texas police after killing a 15-year-old girl, “wanted a soul.” In El Salvador, teenage girls are given the choice of being gang-raped or killed. In the U.S., the distinction has been refined: be raped or join the gang. Local police detectives all over this country have investigated dozens of gruesome murders, usually committed with baseball bats, knives or other weapons of torture. It preys almost exclusively on other Hispanic immigrants, some of whom have complained that MS-13 is taking over their schools.

“I know you’ve been taking a hit on your comments about animals and MS-13, but I think you’re being kind,” acting Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director Thomas Homan told Trump at a discussion on gang violence Wednesday. “Animals kill for survival, MS-13 kills for sport.”

Trump, who likely put Homan up to that testimonial, seems to think he’ll win this debate. I suspect he’s right, and that law-abiding Hispanics — the overwhelming majority — would have little quarrel with his characterization of MS-13.

Trump’s critics also go too far when they sound as though they’ve never heard a U.S. president disparage anyone in salty language. After 1972 Democratic Party nominee George McGovern visited Lyndon Johnson’s Texas ranch to pay his respects, Johnson told his aides, “I didn’t know they made political candidates that dumb.”

In an oral history after leaving office, LBJ described Robert Kennedy’s 1960 machinations designed to keep Johnson from accepting John F. Kennedy’s offer to be on the ticket. “I thought I was dealing with a child,” he said of RFK.

Johnson called JFK a “pathetic” congressman and senator and recalled being present when Franklin Roosevelt decided to fire Kennedy’s father, Joseph Kennedy. “That son of a bitch is a traitor,” Roosevelt said. “He wants to sell us out.”

John Adams referred privately to George Washington as “a muttonhead.” Thomas Jefferson found Andrew Jackson “unfit” for office, while Jackson, in turn, threatened to hang Sen. John C. Calhoun, whom he excoriated as “the basest, meanest scoundrel that ever disgraced the image of God.”

Warren Harding, screamed at Veterans Bureau (as it was then known) administrator Charles Forbes, “You double-crossing bastard!” while throttling the man. Harry Truman threatened the Washington Post’s music critic in writing, warning that he’d like to punch him out and knee him in the groin. After being succeeded by World War II hero Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, Truman fumed. “The general,” he said, “doesn’t know any more about politics than a pig knows about Sunday.”

This churlish insult brings us back to Donald Trump. With the exception of Truman’s “pig” metaphor, do they call other people animals? The short answer is not exactly, but they do use language, particularly in wartime, that calls into question the humanity of America’s enemies. For years, the preferred term was “barbarians.”

In his fourth State of the Union address, Thomas Jefferson spoke of the “barbarians of Tripoli,” which would be rendered by the opposition press today as Jefferson’s “Islamophobia.” Martin Van Buren used the same appellation in describing an act of piracy and murder on the high seas against an American merchant ship.

A month before Pearl Harbor, FDR said that social progress in Europe and China was “being obliterated by the barbarians,” and upon Germany’s defeat in 1945, Truman sent Eisenhower a cable congratulating the general on the “unconditional and abject surrender of the Nazi barbarians.”

In modern times, the appellation “monsters” is often substituted for “barbarians.” Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama all used it. Bush, moreover, once described terrorists as “bloodthirsty,” which connotes vampires — and did so while standing next to Vladimir Putin. When it came to “monsters,” though, Trump may have outdone Bush. He did so with an unusual semantic excercise that foreshadowed his current contretemps. Standing beside Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas in Bethlehem, Trump spoke about a horrific terrorist attack in Manchester, England.

“I won’t call them monsters, because they would like that term,” Trump said. “They would think that’s a great name. I will call them from now on losers because that’s what’s they are. They’re losers. And we’ll have more of them. But they’re losers, just remember that.”

I did, but Trump didn’t.

Carl M. Cannon is executive editor and Washington Bureau chief of RealClearPolitics.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/monsters-animals-and-barbarians-at-the-white-house-gate/

Matt Kemp’s rate of return has kept Dodgers afloat

  • Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp watches his sacrifice fly against the Colorado Rockies during the fifth inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Wednesday, May 23, 2018. Austin Barnes scored on the play. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

    Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp watches his sacrifice fly against the Colorado Rockies during the fifth inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Wednesday, May 23, 2018. Austin Barnes scored on the play. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp lies on the ground after being tagged out to end the game by Colorado Rockies first baseman Ian Desmond as he dove back to first following an overthrow on his single during the ninth inning of a baseball game, Monday, May 21, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Rockies won 2-1. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

    Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp lies on the ground after being tagged out to end the game by Colorado Rockies first baseman Ian Desmond as he dove back to first following an overthrow on his single during the ninth inning of a baseball game, Monday, May 21, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Rockies won 2-1. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

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  • San Diego Padres second baseman Jose Pirela, left, gets set to tag out Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp as Kemp tried to stretch a single into a double, while second base umpire Brian O’Nora watches during the eighth inning of a baseball game Friday, May 25, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

    San Diego Padres second baseman Jose Pirela, left, gets set to tag out Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp as Kemp tried to stretch a single into a double, while second base umpire Brian O’Nora watches during the eighth inning of a baseball game Friday, May 25, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp, second from left, is congratulated by Justin Turner, second from right, and Chris Taylor after hitting a three-run home run as San Diego Padres catcher Raffy Lopez stands at the plate during the first inning of a baseball game Friday, May 25, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

    Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp, second from left, is congratulated by Justin Turner, second from right, and Chris Taylor after hitting a three-run home run as San Diego Padres catcher Raffy Lopez stands at the plate during the first inning of a baseball game Friday, May 25, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp tosses his bat as he hits a three-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the San Diego Padres, Friday, May 25, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

    Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp tosses his bat as he hits a three-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the San Diego Padres, Friday, May 25, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp in action during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks in Los Angeles, Tuesday, May 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Kelvin Kuo)

    Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp in action during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks in Los Angeles, Tuesday, May 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Kelvin Kuo)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp watches his RBI single as Chris Taylor (not pictured) scores against the Arizona Diamondbacks in the first inning of a Major League Baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, May 8, 2018 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp watches his RBI single as Chris Taylor (not pictured) scores against the Arizona Diamondbacks in the first inning of a Major League Baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, May 8, 2018 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp reacts in the dugout before the start of a baseball game against the Miami Marlins, Thursday, May 17, 2018, in Miami. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp reacts in the dugout before the start of a baseball game against the Miami Marlins, Thursday, May 17, 2018, in Miami. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

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LOS ANGELES — When he got traded, he said change was good.

Sure, he loved the Dodgers. He loved the traditions and the friends and the benefits, and the feeling that nothing in the world existed outside Dodger Stadium where you’re rounding the bases inside it.

But now he was with San Diego, a franchise that had won one World Series game. No problem, Matt Kemp said. He wasn’t going to act as if his ceiling collasped, the way Jim Kelly did when the Buffalo Bills drafted him. The first day on the job is always happy.

Kemp learned that change isn’t good. He was introduced to no-hope losing in San Diego. He was traded again, to Atlanta, and San Diego’s co-owner ripped him. Suddenly the man who was the MVP runner-up in 2011 was a salary, swapped for another salary. The Braves were rebuilding and losing, too, and Kemp was the placeholder for upcoming outfielder Ronald Acuna. Then he hurt his hamstring.

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On Saturday Kemp sat at the same Dodger Stadium locker that he occupied when they opened the new clubhouse in 2014.

“I never thought I’d come back here,” he said, as he laced up shoes for a pregame workout. “But then I always thought I’d be a Dodger in the first place.”

It is Memorial Day Weekend and Kemp is still a Dodger, which was not the way to bet, in spring training. He’s also been the best Dodger position player.

He came into Saturday night with a .338 batting average, six home runs and 25 RBI. His .907 OPS is his highest since that massive 2011 season (.986), and he is producing the highest line-drive/at-bat ratio in his career. He is 17 for 35 with men in scoring position.

“Even when he was in San Diego and Atlanta, he was always the guy who would get that run in,” said A.J. Ellis, the ex-Dodger catcher who is now in San Diego. “He looks happy and comfortable up there.”

Kemp’s body reshaping has triggered much of this. He grounded into a league-leading 25 double plays last year. He has done so only three times this year. You can quibble with the “Runs Saved” stat on Fangraphs.com, but Kemp was minus-17 last year in the outfield and is plus-one now.

“I feel really good,” Kemp said. “I’ve got guys like JT (Justin Turner), righthanded hitters to talk about hitting with. There’s great hitting coaches here. I’m really learning a lot more about the game. It’s just fun to come to the ballpark, knowing that there’s a chance to win.

“With all that’s happened to us, we’re three-and-a-half games out of the lead at the end of May and there’s four months left. That’s pretty good.”

When Kemp walked into Camelback Ranch this spring, he found only eight former Dodger teammates. Gone were Andre Ethier and Carl Crawford, two logs in the outfield jam that eventually squeezed Kemp off the roster.

“There were a lot of unfamiliar faces,” Kemp said. “I knew the clubhouse guys and the trainers. But the atmosphere was a little more electric than I remembered. That’s what happens when you go to the World Series.”

Kemp and Dee Gordon were the first exports of Andrew Friedman’s tenure, at a frenetic winter meeting in San Diego. The returns weren’t obvious at first. But the Dodgers got Yasmani Grandal for Kemp and got Austin Barnes, Kiké Hernandez and (indirectly) Howie Kendrick for Gordon. Versatility and defense were in. One-dimensional players were out.

Kemp was under an electron microscope from his first day in L.A., with every home run celebrated, every baserunning mistake dissected. Now the Padres were 10 games out at the All-Star break and it suddenly didn’t matter what Kemp did.

His 23 home runs and 100 RBI moved no needles in 2015. He was better in 2016, and then he was traded in late season for Hector Olvera, and had 35 home runs and 108 RBI overall.

But when he thanked the Padres fans in a Players’ Tribune article and also acknowledged he had built a reputation as being “selfish, lazy and a bad teammate,” Padres co-owner Ron Fowler fired back. “Talk about a bunch of BS,” Fowler said.

The dollar marks moved west when the Braves agreed to take Adrian Gonzalez and Brendan McCarthy for Kemp. The assumed Next Trade didn’t happen, and now the Dodgers find themselves dependent on Kemp. Just like old times.

“Every year, any player has something to prove,” Kemp said. “People will say what they’ll say. You can always control what they say, by playing better.”

He also said, “In my mind I was always going to be a Dodger no matter what. They made my dreams come true.”

Those dreams never changed, even after a wake-up call.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/matt-kemps-rate-of-return-has-kept-dodgers-afloat/

Mater Dei’s Dominique Ruotolo gets a jump on making CIF State track meet

  • Marina’s Skyler Magula wins the pole vault with a vault of 15-09.00S during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Marina’s Skyler Magula wins the pole vault with a vault of 15-09.00S during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mater Dei’s Jade McDonald competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Mater Dei’s Jade McDonald competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

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  • Capistrano Valley’s Haley Herberg finished second in the 3200 meter run during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Capistrano Valley’s Haley Herberg finished second in the 3200 meter run during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Yucaipa’s Asani Hampton wins the 100 meter dash during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Yucaipa’s Asani Hampton wins the 100 meter dash during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mater Dei’s Dominique Ruotolo wins the long jump with a leap of 19-02.50S during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Mater Dei’s Dominique Ruotolo wins the long jump with a leap of 19-02.50S during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mater Dei’s Kelli Godin competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Mater Dei’s Kelli Godin competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Capistrano Valley’s Jolie Robinson competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Capistrano Valley’s Jolie Robinson competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mater Dei’s Kelli Godin competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Mater Dei’s Kelli Godin competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mater Dei’s Dominique Ruotolo wins the long jump with a leap of 19-02.50S during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Mater Dei’s Dominique Ruotolo wins the long jump with a leap of 19-02.50S during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Marina’s Skyler Magula wins the pole vault with a vault of 15-09.00S during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Marina’s Skyler Magula wins the pole vault with a vault of 15-09.00S during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Saugas’ Mariah Castillo wins the 3200 meter run as Capistrano Valley’s Haley Herberg finished second during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Saugas’ Mariah Castillo wins the 3200 meter run as Capistrano Valley’s Haley Herberg finished second during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mater Dei’s Dominique Ruotolo wins the long jump with a leap of 19-02.50S during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Mater Dei’s Dominique Ruotolo wins the long jump with a leap of 19-02.50S during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mater Dei’s Jade McDonald competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Mater Dei’s Jade McDonald competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mater Dei’s Jade McDonald competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Mater Dei’s Jade McDonald competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mater Dei’s Jade McDonald competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Mater Dei’s Jade McDonald competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Capistrano Valley’s Jolie Robinson competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Capistrano Valley’s Jolie Robinson competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mater Dei’s Jade McDonald competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

    Mater Dei’s Jade McDonald competes in the long jump during the CIF-SS Track and Field Masters meet at El Camino College in Torrance, Calif., on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

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TORRANCE — Mater Dei’s Dominique Ruotolo started her Saturday by wearing a cap and gown and being awarded her high school diploma.

In the afternoon, Ruotolo was donning a Monarchs track and field uniform and being awarded two first-place medals at the CIF-SS Masters Meet at El Camino College.

Ruotolo, who had to leave Mater Dei’s commencement ceremony early in order to make it to the meet on time, finished first in the long jump and triple jump, hitting distances of 19-feet, 2-1/2 inches and 41 feet, ½ inch, respectively.

The top six finishers in each event advance to the CIF State Meet, which takes place Friday and Saturday at Buchanan High School in Clovis.

“I missed half of graduation so I said I better jump really far,” said Ruotolo, who is considering offers from LSU and the University of Oregon. “I feel like there is a lot in me and I’m just ready for the state meet to pop off good PRs.”

Ruotolo’s teammate, Jade McDonald, a freshman, qualified fourth in the triple jump.

El Toro’s Maliyah Medley easily won the 400 meters (54.83) and finished fourth in the 200 (24.46), qualifying for the state meet in both events for the second year in a row.

As a sophomore, Medley qualified for the state meet in the 400.

“Today, the wind was really harsh, so it was kind of hard to get my time low,” said Medley, who will attend UCLA. “But my goal was definitely to qualify for state.”

Nikki Merritt of Santa Margarita also qualified for the state meet in multiple events.

Merritt was second in the 300 hurdles, fifth in the 100 hurdles and ran the third leg of the Eagles’ 400 relay team which finished sixth.

In the discus, Costa Mesa’s Tayla Crenshaw threw 140-3 to qualify second and Trabuco Hills’ Kyliegh Wilkerson was third with 140-0.

Faimalie Sale of Los Alamitos qualified fourth in the shot put with a throw of 43-8 1/2.

On the boys side, Esperanza sophomore Jeff Duensing easily won the shot put with a throw of 60-1 3/4, nearly 3 inches farther than second-place finisher Aiden Elbettar of Newport Harbor.

Duensing also qualified in the discus, finishing fifth (177–11).

Mission Viejo’s Christian LaValle finished second in the discus with a mark of 180-9.

Mater Dei’s Sam VanDorpe had to contend with the same logistical issue as Ruotolo, racing from the graduation ceremony to get to the meet on time to run the 800.

Like his teammate, VanDorpe was undaunted. He won the race in 1:51.44. Mission Viejo’s Brett Hickman finished second in the race and Tesoro’s Ryan Bush took third.

In a 1,600 relay that was a near carbon copy of the Division 1 final a week earlier, Aliso Niguel’s anchor runner, Michael Phillippy, blew by Long Beach Wilson’s anchor in the final 100 and won going away.

Phillippy and relay mates Isaiah Darden, Trevor Williams and Andrew Koesel won in 3:14.68, establishing the best time in the state this season for the third time.

“Our main goal was just to make it to next week,” Williams said. “We didn’t put too much pressure on running a certain time or taking a certain place. All we wanted to do is make it to next week and we can kill it there.”

Phillippy also finished fifth in the 400 and will compete in both events at Clovis.

Marina’s Skyler Magula and Mission Viejo’s Mason Gariepy both cleared 15-9 in the pole vault, but Magula advanced to the state meet as the Masters champion on a tiebreaker.

Sean Lee, who set the Division 1 record with a jump of 7 feet, 2-1/2 inches in last week’s division finals, cleared 6-8 on Saturday, 2 inches higher than the 6-6 required to qualify for the state meet.

Los Alamitos’ Kevin Schmidt also cleared 6-8 and will join Lee at the state meet.

Trabuco Hills’ 400 relay team of Tylor Kraft, Jake Burns, Kyle Kong and Jay Williams finished second.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/mater-deis-dominique-ruotolo-gets-a-jump-on-making-cif-state-track-meet/

Customer at Santa Ana restaurant shoots through drive-through window, striking robbery suspect

An alleged robber was shot at a Santa Ana fast food restaurant early Saturday when a customer in the drive-though line saw the robbery in progress and fired shots through a window, police said.

Santa Ana Police Cmdr. Michael Claborn said the incident occurred just after midnight at the Cozy Corner Drive-In, 426 N. Harbor Blvd., when a man waiting for his food in the drive-through line saw a robbery in progress in the restaurant.

The man fired several shots at the robber, shattering the drive-through window, Claborn said.

“It was very dangerous, one of the employees could have been shot,” he said.

The alleged robber collapsed and was taken to a nearby hospital. He was hit multiple times but was expected to survive, Claborn said. The man was arrested on suspicion of robbery. His identity was not available Saturday.

The shooter sped off in his vehicle, Claborn said, adding that the man is now wanted on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon. No suspect description was available.

The incident was captured on surveillance video, which was broadcast by stations including CBS Los Angeles.

Cozy Corner remained open for business Saturday.

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/customer-at-santa-ana-restaurant-shoots-through-drive-through-window-striking-robbery-suspect/

Accelerate completes Santa Anita double with win in Gold Cup

  • Accelerate and jockey Victor Espinoza win the Grade I, $500,000 Gold Cup horse race at Santa Anita on Saturday, May 26, 2018, at Santa Anita in Arcadia, Calif. (Benoit Photo via AP)

    Accelerate and jockey Victor Espinoza win the Grade I, $500,000 Gold Cup horse race at Santa Anita on Saturday, May 26, 2018, at Santa Anita in Arcadia, Calif. (Benoit Photo via AP)

  • Accelerate and jockey Victor Espinoza win the Grade I, $500,000 Gold Cup horse race at Santa Anita on Saturday, May 26, 2018, at Santa Anita in Arcadia, Calif. (Benoit Photo via AP)

    Accelerate and jockey Victor Espinoza win the Grade I, $500,000 Gold Cup horse race at Santa Anita on Saturday, May 26, 2018, at Santa Anita in Arcadia, Calif. (Benoit Photo via AP)

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  • Accelerate and jockey Victor Espinoza win the Grade I, $500,000 Gold Cup horse race at Santa Anita on Saturday, May 26, 2018, at Santa Anita in Arcadia, Calif. (Benoit Photo via AP)

    Accelerate and jockey Victor Espinoza win the Grade I, $500,000 Gold Cup horse race at Santa Anita on Saturday, May 26, 2018, at Santa Anita in Arcadia, Calif. (Benoit Photo via AP)

  • Accelerate and jockey Victor Espinoza win the Grade I, $500,000 Gold Cup horse race at Santa Anita on Saturday, May 26, 2018, at Santa Anita in Arcadia, Calif. (Benoit Photo via AP)

    Accelerate and jockey Victor Espinoza win the Grade I, $500,000 Gold Cup horse race at Santa Anita on Saturday, May 26, 2018, at Santa Anita in Arcadia, Calif. (Benoit Photo via AP)

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ARCADIA — A year ago, trainer John Sadler didn’t think Accelerate was a mile and a quarter horse. He’d just defeated Arrogate in the San Diego Handicap at Del Mar, a 1-1/16-mile race, and he ran the son of Lookin At Lucky in the Pacific Classic only because he felt obligated to do so.

Today, after the 5-year-old horse made short work of five rivals in the $500,000 Grade I Gold Cup at Santa Anita on Saturday, he’s got a horse in his barn that became only the ninth horse to win the Big ‘Cap and Gold Cup, both mile and a quarter races, in the same year.

“He’s just kind of showed us … when we ran him in the Pacific Classic last year he ran a good third against Arrogate and Collected, who was so sharp at that time,” Sadler said. “So it was an encouraging race, and then by coincidence the Santa Anita Handicap came up in slop and he loved that, just skipped through it.”I think it’s just a maturation process. He was a little immature at 2. He was a late foal. I think he’s just getting better as time goes on.”

Accelerate turned the tables on Gold Cup favorite City of Light. When the two met in last month’s Grade II Oaklawn Handicap, it was City of Light who prevailed by a neck. On Saturday, there was no stopping Accelerate as he took command at the head of the stretch and drew off to beat the pacesetting Dr. Dorr by 4-1/4 lengths after a 5-1/2-length victory in the Big ‘Cap on March 10.

The winner ran the 1-1/4 miles over a fast main track in 2:01.38 as the 9-5 second choice. Dr. Dorr, the 7-2 third choice, held second by 1-1/4 lengths over City of Light, the 6-5 favorite. Pavel finished fourth, another 4-1/4 lengths back.

“He looked beautiful today,” Sadler said. “He’s just done well since his last race. He’s a 5-year-old. He’s a strong horse, a sound horse, a happy horse. Sometimes I look to keep them in the barn, but he’s just doing so well he said I should be running. So that’s what we did.”

Winning rider Victor Espinoza felt getting Accelerate out of the gate in good order was key to the horse’s seventh victory in 19 starts. He improved his career bankroll to $1,712,480 with his second Grade I victory.

“I helped him out of the gate, which was my job today,” Espinoza said. “If I let him break by himself, he can be a little bit slow out of the gate. So I encouraged him. I shook his neck a little bit and I was able to get him in a good position.”

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Accelerate carried 4 pounds more than the other horses, which Sadler thought made the victory even more noteworthy.

“What we kind of forget in modern stuff is, because he already won a Group 1, he’s the high weight, 125 pounds. So he’s giving weight to everybody at a mile and a quarter, (which) makes it that much more impressive.”

Espinoza, who has been aboard Accelerate in seven of his past eight starts, was also impressed.

“He’s improving still, and he’s beat the best before. He’s capable of anything,” he said.

The morning scratch of one of the horses on paper who figured to supply some of the early speed, Little Scotty, left some wondering who would set the pace. It turned out to be Dr. Dorr and Joe Talamo, who had gone virtually gate to wire to win the Grade II Californian Stakes by 7-1/4 lengths on April 28.

Dr. Dorr, a 5-year-old gelded son of Lookin At Lucky, set a moderate pace of 23.28, 47.40 and 1:11.70 before falling victim to Accelerate’s winning move in the stretch.

“It set up perfectly,” Talamo said. “He made an easy lead with his ears pricked and he kept fighting, as you saw. He really ran hard, a helluva race for him.

Said City of Light’s jockey, Drayden Van Dyke: “Accelerate really ran strong at the end and we couldn’t go with him. My horse relaxed real good. I definitely think he can get this distance.”

Sadler wouldn’t commit on when or where Accelerate will run next, but he mentioned the Pacific Classic on Aug. 18 as being on the horse’s radar. He said the Breeders’ Cup Classic at Churchill Downs on Nov. 3 is the ultimate goal.

“We’re going to enjoy this today and see how it comes up,” he said. “We’ll look at everything. We have a top horse in the country, really, in this division. We’ll look at everything and then decide.”

Sadler just hopes to keep Accelerate healthy and sound for Churchill Downs.

“And he really likes mud. It might rain in November,” he said with a smile.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/accelerate-completes-santa-anita-double-with-win-in-gold-cup/

Heisler: LeBron James off for Game 7 in Boston, and who knows after that?

Last Tango in Cleveland, at least for the moment.

We don’t know if Friday’s Game 6 victory over Boston was LeBron James’ last game in Cleveland as a Cavalier. He’s often at this point after a career of making sure he, not others, gets to choose.

As usual, he hasn’t said if he wants to leave, where he wants to go or why he wants to go there. If it never stops anyone from guessing, he has unfailingly surprised all.

His inaugural runup to free agency came in 2010 after years of league-wide speculation featuring annual LeBronStock festivals in New York with the Cavaliers considered frontrunners and no one predicting he would go to Miami, but he did.

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Four seasons later after four Finals and two titles in Miami, no one had him leaving the Heat, much less going home to Cleveland and the owner who defamed him after he left, but he did.

Bron assumed control of his career as a third-year player — at age 21 — demanding an extension with two fewer seasons and $20 million less that would enable him to become a free agent four times (2010, 2014, 2016, 2018).

So, hooray for him. Now 33, he has been as shrewd off the court as he has been overwhelming on it.

Michael Jordan, still an easy choice as the greatest who ever was, as surely as six titles are still more than three, however recent, played 13 seasons on terms very friendly to the Bulls, even with super agent David Falk in his corner.

With Mike intent on avoiding unpleasant confrontations to maximize his Nike ambitions, it took a two-year, $63 million thank-you payoff from owner Jerry Reinsdorf for Mike’s final seasons to bring his career earnings in Chicago to $92 million … behind contemporaries Shaquille O’Neal ($292 million), Alonzo Mourning ($143 million) and Patrick Ewing ($123 million)… and less than 51 other NBA players, according to salaries listed by Basketball Reference.

With the NBA’s swelling TV revenue driving raises, Kevin Garnett, whose last contract in Minnesota carried him through age 40, is No. 1 all-time at $344 million. Kobe Bryant, who retired at 37, is No. 2 at $328 million.

LeBron is No. 6 at $234 million. At next season’s max salary — $35.4 million with annual 5 percent raises — he would vault into No. 1 in 2021 at 36.

Of course, like Jordan, James’ salary is merely base pay. In 2018, Forbes projects LeBron at another $50 million in endorsements and outside earnings.

So this is really about what Bron wants after he has it all, or came as close as anyone has to Jordan.

In 2010 James wanted to stay in Cleveland but couldn’t get anyone to go there and had to join Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh in Miami

In 2014 Bron wanted to go home to cement his legacy in Ohio, which he still cared about… and no one, not even the Cavs, had picked up on.

The local legacy is now secure with that improbable title he led the Cavs to in 2016, coming from 3-1 down to the Warriors.

He’s still technically working on his legacy in today’s Game 7, even if the Cavs are two-point underdogs to a Boston lineup that looks like it could have started last July in summer league (Jaylen Brown, Jayson Tatum, Terry Rozier and Aaron Baynes alongside Al Horford),  knowing the Cavs would be a longshot in the Finals, and in the East after this when the Celtics get Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward back.

I’m not going to presume to tell you what LeBron is thinking since he manages never to say, even if he signals one thing ( like his distaste for Cavs owner Dan Gilbert) and then shows he’s big enough to put mere personality conflicts behind him if it conflicts with what he wants.

The Lakers look like a viable choice with the sun rising over them for a change. The 76ers could be if they were interested in Bron, but they think they own a future of their own and don’t have to rearrange themselves for a thirty-something superstar. Same for the Celtics.

Houston is a possibility with a narrow window, cap flexibility and Chris Paul, Bron’s best buddy but the Rockets may win a title without Bron, leaving him looking like Kevin Durant fleeing to Golden State at this revered point in his career.

Cleveland?

Doesn’t look promising.

As in 2010, the more pressure he put on the organization, the more Gilbert meddled, the more their good management people left, the more desperate, older and less cohesive they got … and the dimmer their future.

ESPN’s Brian Windhorst, a former Cavs beat writer who attended Bron’s high school in Akron, notes a pattern the pursuit of titles and keeping Bron leading his teams, here and in Miami, to “win-now, pay-later decisions. Acquire older veterans instead of developing younger players. Sign players to large contracts because they fit with James…. Trade draft picks to get veterans or as a way to relieve payroll pressure. Deal with the stress of repeated long playoff runs, endure massive media scrutiny, manage varying degrees of drama.

“The players get sick of one another. They get sick of the coach. The coach gets sick of the players. As a group, they lose sight of the process of the season because it becomes monotonous. There are highs — with James teams there are always highs — but the baggage everyone is carrying makes the flight that much harder to maintain.”

The Cavs re-assembled the roster at midseason to become more athletic and better defensively. Instead, Portland’s C.J. McCollum said the Cavs he saw in March were “one of the worst defensive teams I’ve ever played against, honestly.”

McCollum, speaking to Blazer fans, said he had tried recruiting Bron’s fellow free agent-to-be, Paul George, before and was giving up.

Said McCollum: “I wish him nothing but the best and I’m sure he’ll enjoy that California sunshine next season.

“What?” said McCollum, when laughter erupted. “It’s the truth.”

It’s not anything yet but today is another day when we’ll see what it becomes.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/heisler-lebron-james-off-for-game-7-in-boston-and-who-knows-after-that/

It doesn’t look a day over 60: Venerable Strawberry Festival hosts colorful parade in Garden Grove

With Mickey Mouse as a grand marshal, the 60th annual Strawberry Festival Parade rumbled through the streets of Garden Grove Saturday, May 26.

Per tradition, the historic parade featured floats, school bands and equestrians.

  • Thrill-seekers get an adrenaline rush on the Turbo ride during the 60th annual Strawberry Festival in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Thrill-seekers get an adrenaline rush on the Turbo ride during the 60th annual Strawberry Festival in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • What’s a Strawberry Festival Parade without the strawberry? Mya Shimizu, 18, happily fills the role as mascot as she leads the parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    What’s a Strawberry Festival Parade without the strawberry? Mya Shimizu, 18, happily fills the role as mascot as she leads the parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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  • Lady sports a green ear and a reddish ear, a dye job that “came out wrong,” said owner Ricardo Mendoza, who wanted the pup to resemble a strawberry. They were at the Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Lady sports a green ear and a reddish ear, a dye job that “came out wrong,” said owner Ricardo Mendoza, who wanted the pup to resemble a strawberry. They were at the Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Alice Wu, of the hydration crew, tends to Soundwaves Homeschool marching band members during the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Alice Wu, of the hydration crew, tends to Soundwaves Homeschool marching band members during the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Spectators scramble to catch items thrown to them during  Garden Grove’s 60th annual Strawberry Festival Parade on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Spectators scramble to catch items thrown to them during Garden Grove’s 60th annual Strawberry Festival Parade on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A diminutive pony and a rider with Rancho La Laguna take part in the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    A diminutive pony and a rider with Rancho La Laguna take part in the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • “This is Us” TV series actors Parker Bates and Mackenzie Hancsicsak interact with the crowd during the 60th annual Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    “This is Us” TV series actors Parker Bates and Mackenzie Hancsicsak interact with the crowd during the 60th annual Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A classic car coasts along during the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. Council member Patrick Phat Bui was in the back. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    A classic car coasts along during the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. Council member Patrick Phat Bui was in the back. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Rockstarz Athletics perform stunts at the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Rockstarz Athletics perform stunts at the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Garden Grove High School cheerleaders keep the crowd cheery during the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Garden Grove High School cheerleaders keep the crowd cheery during the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • An El Bekal Shriner leaves bubbles in his wake during the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    An El Bekal Shriner leaves bubbles in his wake during the Strawberry Festival Parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Eliab Garcia, 4, is all smiles as he chases bubbles with his twin brother Aiden, not pictured, at the Strawberry Festival in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Eliab Garcia, 4, is all smiles as he chases bubbles with his twin brother Aiden, not pictured, at the Strawberry Festival in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The crowd is reflected on the mirror of a Garden Grove fire truck during the Strawberry Festival Parade on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The crowd is reflected on the mirror of a Garden Grove fire truck during the Strawberry Festival Parade on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Girls get scrambled at the Strawberry Festival in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Girls get scrambled at the Strawberry Festival in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Eight-month-old Charlotte Black is too young to eat strawberry shortcake, but she enjoys some whipped cream shared by her parents, Stephanie and Rob in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Eight-month-old Charlotte Black is too young to eat strawberry shortcake, but she enjoys some whipped cream shared by her parents, Stephanie and Rob in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The Strawberry Festival’s mouth-watering dessert tops off the day after the 60th annual parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May  26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The Strawberry Festival’s mouth-watering dessert tops off the day after the 60th annual parade in Garden Grove on Saturday, May 26, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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The day began with a 5K run, and ended with three dozen carnival rides, 200 food and merchandise vendors, live entertainment and quirky contests.

The Strawberry Festival will continue through the Memorial Day weekend, Sunday and Monday.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/it-doesnt-look-a-day-over-60-venerable-strawberry-festival-hosts-colorful-parade-in-garden-grove/

Shohei Ohtani back on track to return to Angels rotation

NEW YORK — The interruption in Shohei Ohtani’s pitching schedule may end up amounting to only a few days.

Ohtani threw a light bullpen session Saturday, which could put him back on schedule to start Wednesday in Detroit. He had been expected to start Sunday in New York, but the Angels scratched him, citing “workload management.”

Manager Mike Scioscia was noncommittal Saturday afternoon about the plans for Ohtani, beyond saying he had to get through a light bullpen session and a more intense one.

“We are going to wait for these things to happen,” Scioscia said. “We do anticipate, if everything goes well, that he’s pitching sometime in Detroit.”

The Angels open a four-game series Monday in Detroit.

Ohtani’s previous schedule had him throwing the light bullpen four days before a start, and the heavier one two days prior.

By scratching Ohtani’s start Sunday, the Angels denied fans the chance to see Ohtani and Masahiro Tanaka share the mound. Instead, they are likely to see Ohtani hit against Tanaka.

Ohtani had said Thursday he figured there would plenty of chances down the road to pitch against each other.

Tanaka, speaking Saturday, didn’t seem to be too disappointed that their meeting has changed.

“It was becoming a big thing, facing each other,” Tanaka said through his interpreter. “That going away maybe spoils it for the fans a little bit, but I’ll probably face him as a batter, so I just have to go out there and do my thing and try to get him out.”

Scioscia would not commit to Ohtani hitting Sunday. The Angels have made it clear Ohtani will not be able to start at DH the day before or after he pitches, but he’s started almost every other day he’s been available. The only exceptions were when the Angels were facing left-handed pitchers. Tanaka is a right-hander.

ALSO

Scioscia said he is not ready to switch to a lineup with Ohtani batting ahead of Albert Pujols. Coming into Saturday’s game, Ohtani had a .967 OPS and Pujols had a .692 mark. “You always consider all kind of lineups, but right now I think certainly Mike (Trout), Justin (Upton) and Albert are all swinging it well,” Scioscia said. “They will definitely create situations for Shohei.” …

Michael Hermosillo had two hits in six at-bats in the four games he played during his first big league stint, which ended when he was optioned to make room for Jaime Barría. “It’s good for him to come up here and see the beast, see what major league pitching is, get into a major league game,” Scioscia said. “It helps you go down and bring some confidence and hopefully continue to grow. If he reaches his potential, he’s going to be a very good major league outfielder.”

UP NEXT

Angels (Garrett Richards, 4-3, 3.31) at Yankees (Masahiro Tanaka, 5-2, 4.95), 10 a.m., Fox Sports West, KLAA (830 AM).

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/shohei-ohtani-back-on-track-to-return-to-angels-rotation/

Suspect in high-speed chase called 911 and threatened to shoot officers, police say

GARDEN GROVE – A burglary suspect who threatened to shoot police was arrested Saturday after leading authorities on a pursuit from Garden Grove to El Monte, authorities said.

“While fleeing from officers, the suspect called 911 and claimed he had a firearm and was threatening to shoot officers,” Garden Grove Police Lt. Carl Whitney said in a news release.

Garden Grove officers spotted a vehicle speeding at 4:10 a.m. Saturday, May 26 before learning a burglary had taken place at Papa Wheelie Bicycles at 6949 Chapman Ave., Whitney said.

The suspect stopped on the northbound 605 Freeway in Downey. When he refused to exit the vehicle, a weapon was used to break out the rear windows.

Police also employed a spike strip, but the vehicle kept going on the northbound 605 until it became disabled in the city of El Monte.

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“A chemical agent was deployed into the suspect vehicle and the suspect surrendered and was taken into custody,” Whitney said. Property stolen from the bicycle business was found in the vehicle.

The suspect was later identified as Joe Richard Wijnaendts, 50, Whitney said.

Wijnaendts was arrested on suspicion of commercial burglary, vehicle pursuit and barricade and booked into the Orange County jail, Whitney said.

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/suspect-in-high-speed-chase-called-911-and-threatened-to-shoot-officers-police-say/

There’s a gold rush hitting Ghost Town Alive! at Knott’s this summer season

Knott’s Berry Farm is offering plenty of fun this summer: It unveiled its new roller coaster, HangTime; opened Soak City water park; and now Ghost Town Alive! has returned.

Ghost Town Alive!, which was the winner of the Themed Entertainment Association 2018 award for “Outstanding Achievement,” is an immersive, interactive experience. Park guests encounter the citizens of Calico and are invited to join them in their daily tasks, along with a few highlights, such as a dealing with a bank robbery and enjoying a sunset hoedown.

  • Sheriff Bryce Wheeler and deputies transport the gold shipment in Calico as Knott’s Berry Farm features Ghost Town Alive! on Wednesday June 14, 2017. (Photo by Keith Durflinger/San Gabriel Valley Tribune/SCNG)

    Sheriff Bryce Wheeler and deputies transport the gold shipment in Calico as Knott’s Berry Farm features Ghost Town Alive! on Wednesday June 14, 2017. (Photo by Keith Durflinger/San Gabriel Valley Tribune/SCNG)

  • Knott’s entertainment producer Eric Nix shared what guests may expect at Ghost Town Alive!, as well as the summer shows, during the HangTime Media Night at Knott’s Berry Farm in Buena Park Thursday, May 17, 2018. (Staff photo by Michelle J. Mills)

    Knott’s entertainment producer Eric Nix shared what guests may expect at Ghost Town Alive!, as well as the summer shows, during the HangTime Media Night at Knott’s Berry Farm in Buena Park Thursday, May 17, 2018. (Staff photo by Michelle J. Mills)

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  • Guests and townsfolk join in the Hoedown as Knott’s Berry Farm features Ghost Town Alive! on Wednesday June 14, 2017. Ghost Town Alive! and Knott’s summer season runs through September 3, 2018. (Photo by Keith Durflinger/San Gabriel Valley Tribune/SCNG)

    Guests and townsfolk join in the Hoedown as Knott’s Berry Farm features Ghost Town Alive! on Wednesday June 14, 2017. Ghost Town Alive! and Knott’s summer season runs through September 3, 2018. (Photo by Keith Durflinger/San Gabriel Valley Tribune/SCNG)

  • Town reporter, Izzy Malloy at work as Knott’s Berry Farm features Ghost Town Alive!, offering an interactive experience with Calico characters and entertainment on June 14, 2017. (Photo by Keith Durflinger/San Gabriel Valley Tribune/SCNG)

    Town reporter, Izzy Malloy at work as Knott’s Berry Farm features Ghost Town Alive!, offering an interactive experience with Calico characters and entertainment on June 14, 2017. (Photo by Keith Durflinger/San Gabriel Valley Tribune/SCNG)

  • Sheriff Bryce Wheeler, right and Deputy Sutton Wynn keep Calico safe as Knott’s Berry Farm features Ghost Town Alive! June 14, 2017. (Photo by Keith Durflinger/San Gabriel Valley Tribune/SCNG)

    Sheriff Bryce Wheeler, right and Deputy Sutton Wynn keep Calico safe as Knott’s Berry Farm features Ghost Town Alive! June 14, 2017. (Photo by Keith Durflinger/San Gabriel Valley Tribune/SCNG)

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There is also a continuing storyline for Ghost Town Alive!. In 2017, the season ended with the discovery of gold, and this year the tale continues with a gold rush, during which the town’s denizens are seeking their fortunes. There will be new characters and activities, too.

“It’s about connecting with people. We’re looking at more puzzles for people to solve, more backstory for all of our characters and lots more interactivity,” said Knott’s entertainment producer Eric Nix, who credits Knott’s vice-president Ken Parks for encouraging more interactivity. “Because that’s what it’s all about.”

Ghost Town Alive! continues select days through Sept. 3.

Also new for summer are two shows, “Calico’s Mountain Jamboree!” and “Beach Blanket Beagle,” on select days June 9-Aug. 19.

“This year we’re presenting ‘Calico’s Mountain Jamboree’ at the Calico Mine Stage. That will be super fun because it’s an action-packed sort of stunt show. We’ve got some trampoline acts, we’ve got some rope climbing,” Nix said.

The show features a feats-of-strength styled competition between the Calico miners and the Timber Mountain loggers. Who wins? Nix said you have to watch to find out.

“Beach Blanket Beagle” in the Charles M. Schulz Theatre is a tribute to Southern California surf culture and the films of the 1960s.

“What I find most fascinating about the show is we’re actually flooding the stage. We normally do our ice shows in there. Well, we’re doing an ice show without the ice and the dancers will actually be dancing in the water in front of this beach scene with a pier and a beach shack,” Nix said.

The show will also feature Snoopy and a Polynesian dance troupe with a fire knife performer.

The theater’s beach and tiki theme will start outside with its entrance ramp boasting a thatched roof and archway. Some of the decor will carry into the park as well, and to complete the vibe the sound system is already playing surf rock tunes in the Charles M. Schulz Theatre and Boardwalk areas.

If you want to go to Ghost Town Alive!

When: Open 10 a.m. daily Saturday, May 26, through Aug. 19, plus Aug. 24-26 and Aug. 31-Sept. 3.

Where: Knott’s Berry Farm, 8039 Beach Blvd., Buena Park

Tickets: $49-$79.

Information: 714-220-5200, www.knotts.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/theres-a-gold-rush-hitting-ghost-town-alive-at-knotts-this-summer-season/

22 states ban housing discrimination against gays, rights groups say

Orange County Congressman Dana Rohrabacher ignited a firestorm when he said this month Congress shouldn’t extend fair housing protections to gays and lesbians.

But, California and 21 other states already have done so, according to two LGBTQ websites.

Currently, it’s illegal to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation in Rohrabacher’s home state as well as in such states as Colorado, Iowa, New Mexico and Utah, the sites say.

Twenty of those states, including California, also extend fair housing protections to people on the basis of “gender identity.”

Rohrabacher, a Republican seeking a 16th term in Congress, told Orange County Realtors delegation during a May 16 meeting at his Capitol Hill office he opposes a pending measure extending the U.S. Fair Housing Act to gays, lesbians and transsexuals. He repeated that view in an interview with the Southern California News Group Thursday, saying homeowners should have the right to “choose who they do business with.”

“We’ve drawn a line on racism, but I don’t think we should extend that line,” Rohrabacher said.

The Fair Housing Act passed in 1968 forbids home sellers, landlords and lenders from denying housing to people because of their race, color, religion, sex, national origin or because they’re disabled. But gays, lesbians and transsexuals are not explicitly included.

The Fair and Equal Housing Act of 2017 would extend housing protections to those groups. That bill is still in committee.

“It’s very easy for the congressman to ignore the wishes of his own state,” said Charlotte Clymer, a spokesperson for the Washington, D.C., based Human Rights Campaign, one of two websites that compiled the state-by-state list of housing protections for gays and lesbians. “But Californians long ago, loud and clear, made their views known on this, and he should follow suit.”

California law was amended in 1999 to ban discrimination based on a person’s sexual orientation and amended in 2004 to ban discrimination based on his or her gender identity, according to the website LGBTMap.org.

Twenty-eight states don’t explicitly ban housing discrimination against gays and lesbians, LGBTMap reported. They include Southern states such as Mississippi, Alabama and the Carolinas, and farm states like Kansas and Missouri. But Pennsylvania, Arizona and Michigan also do not have explicit housing protections for gays and lesbians, the website reported.

Meanwhile, former Orange County GOP Chair Scott Baugh, Rohrabacher’s chief Republican rival in his re-election bid, issued a statement Friday supporting legislation “protecting homebuyers from discrimination based on their sexual orientation.”

“It is outrageous that a sitting congressman would publicly defend discriminating against gay people,” Baugh’s statement said.

Related stories:

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/22-states-ban-housing-discrimination-against-gays-rights-groups-say/

How to communicate with someone under 35 – AKA how to get your call returned

Business owners are aging in Orange County. Frequently, I take a meeting with a business owner in his late 50s or 60s who introduces me to his heir apparent – a son, daughter or in-law. It’s this new generation that has made communication critically important.

Being a proud father of three young adults born between 1983 and 1988 (who are married to two more), I am somewhat qualified to give advice on effective communication with millennials.

If you are a boomer — as I am — born between 1945 and 1957, your business conversation hierarchy from most important to least important goes something like this:

  • Face to face
  • Call to the office or home
  • A reluctant call to the cell – only in an emergency
  • Write – letter
  • Email
  • Other – text, social media outlet, etc.

If you were born before 2000 and after 1982, chances are (I guarantee it) you have a different business conversation hierarchy. From most used to least:

  • text
  • Snap Chat
  • tweet
  • FB message (if over 30)
  • Instagram (if under 30)
  • Other – call – are you kidding me? –  email, face-to-face, what is a home phone anyway
  • Write? – hmmm, not if more than 140 characters

Ok, now that I’ve highlighted the differences, how can you effectively communicate with someone under 35?

Here are some suggestions:

Make it all about them

If you have ever dealt with someone under 35, you know that the minute they want something, it cannot happen fast enough. In the return situation, well, not so much. Tailor your message ever so slightly to make them the focus.

Example: My wife and I rented a beach house for a week last year with the hopes of having a nice family gathering. We needed to get “buy-in” on a week that would work for all of us. We knew that if we called, texted or “othered,” we would be lucky to get a timely response from one out of five. So, we text messaged all five and said “we are discussing an early distribution of our estate. Please call.” Within five minutes we heard from all five! Now, we didn’t lie; the travel and rental – that we contributed – were an early distribution.

Employ the DEFCON system

I love the movie “War Games.” A computer game generated global nuclear war. (Not really — it was only a game but NORAD didn’t know that!) DEFCON was used in the movie. DEFCON (1-5) stands for defense condition and reflects the current status of military awareness (1 least to 5 most) in preparation for an attack.

DEFCON for communication to someone under 35 is 1st level (email) 2nd level (call) 3rd level (text) 4th level – all three at once – 5th level – a personal visit.

Send them a letter

THIS will freak them out!

Mirror their timing. In this crazy digital age, your contacts can now be any of the 24 hours in the day. Watch when people under 35 respond to you and mirror that timing.

Don’t take the lack of gratitude personally. Boomers grew up believing that to not respond was rude, mostly because our Ps and Grand Ps were from the “greatest generation” where gratitude was a part of life. If you don’t get a thank-you for a job well done or for a gift you sent or for busting your hump to make something happen (see all about them), try not to take it personally. They certainly don’t – or they would say thanks.

Please comment below with your question and I will promptly respond.

Allen C. Buchanan is a principal and commercial real estate broker with Lee & Associates, Orange. He can be reached at 714.564.7104 or abuchanan@lee-associates.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/how-to-communicate-with-someone-under-35-aka-how-to-get-your-call-returned/

Fan hit by flying bat at Rancho Cucamonga Quakes game raises baseball safety question

Cloey Heckendorn won’t forget that Mother’s Day baseball game.

A few innings into a Rancho Cucamonga Quakes’ minor-league contest, the 27-year-old Chino Hills resident glanced down at her phone to text her mom about dinner plans.

Seconds later, a bat from Los Angeles Dodgers’ third baseman Justin Turner — playing for the Quakes as he came back from an injury — slipped from his hands, flew into the crowd behind the third-base dugout and struck Heckendorn in the head.

Blood dripped from a cut in her hair as Heckendorn’s 7-year-old nephew watched. Paramedics rushed her to a hospital, where she got 10 staples.

  • Riley Piorkowski, a 9-year-old Hesperia resident, hopes to catch a foul ball Wednesday, May 23,  like her sister. The Quakes fan is on the fence about netting along left field beyond the dugout  at LoanMart Field. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

    Riley Piorkowski, a 9-year-old Hesperia resident, hopes to catch a foul ball Wednesday, May 23, like her sister. The Quakes fan is on the fence about netting along left field beyond the dugout at LoanMart Field. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Tremor, a Rancho Cucamonga Quakes mascot, entertains Wednesday, May 23, at LoanMart Field. A woman recently was struck by a flying bat to the right of this third-base dugout.  (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

    Tremor, a Rancho Cucamonga Quakes mascot, entertains Wednesday, May 23, at LoanMart Field. A woman recently was struck by a flying bat to the right of this third-base dugout. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

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  • Greg Piorkowski shows a photo of himself, in white, catching a foul ball at a 2015 Dodgers game. “I’m an anti-net guy,” the Hesperia resident said at the Wednesday, May 23, Rancho Cucamonga Quakes game. “We should be part of the game.” He supports the net between the dugout and stands and behind the plate, but not the ones along left and right fields. Piorkowski and his daughter sat near the spot where a woman was struck by a flying bat at a Quakes game on Mother’s Day.
(Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

    Greg Piorkowski shows a photo of himself, in white, catching a foul ball at a 2015 Dodgers game. “I’m an anti-net guy,” the Hesperia resident said at the Wednesday, May 23, Rancho Cucamonga Quakes game. “We should be part of the game.” He supports the net between the dugout and stands and behind the plate, but not the ones along left and right fields. Piorkowski and his daughter sat near the spot where a woman was struck by a flying bat at a Quakes game on Mother’s Day. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Minor League Baseball officials say it’s rare for a bat to fly into the crowd and hit a fan.
(Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

    Minor League Baseball officials say it’s rare for a bat to fly into the crowd and hit a fan. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • The Rancho Cucamonga Quakes exceed Minor League Baseball netting recommendations, officials say. A woman was struck by a flying bat at a Quakes game at LoanMart Field on Mother’s Day.
(Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

    The Rancho Cucamonga Quakes exceed Minor League Baseball netting recommendations, officials say. A woman was struck by a flying bat at a Quakes game at LoanMart Field on Mother’s Day. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • The Rancho Cucamonga Quakes exceed Minor League Baseball netting recommendations, officials say. A woman was struck by a flying bat at a Quakes game at LoanMart Field on Mother’s Day.
(Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

    The Rancho Cucamonga Quakes exceed Minor League Baseball netting recommendations, officials say. A woman was struck by a flying bat at a Quakes game at LoanMart Field on Mother’s Day. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • A net stretches along the first-base line Wednesday, May 23, at LoanMart Field, home of the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes. Though a woman was struck by a flying bat at a Quakes game on Mother’s Day, the stadium netting exceeds Minor League Baseball netting recommendations.
(Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

    A net stretches along the first-base line Wednesday, May 23, at LoanMart Field, home of the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes. Though a woman was struck by a flying bat at a Quakes game on Mother’s Day, the stadium netting exceeds Minor League Baseball netting recommendations. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Greg Piorkowski says Rancho Cucamonga Quakes fans come with mitts in hopes of catching foul balls. Piorkowski and his daughter sat Wednesday, May 23, near the spot where a woman was struck by a flying bat at a May 13 Quakes game.
(Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

    Greg Piorkowski says Rancho Cucamonga Quakes fans come with mitts in hopes of catching foul balls. Piorkowski and his daughter sat Wednesday, May 23, near the spot where a woman was struck by a flying bat at a May 13 Quakes game. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • The view from behind home plate at the Wednesday, May 23, Rancho Cucamonga Quakes game. A woman was struck by a flying bat at a May 13 game at LoanMart Field.
(Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

    The view from behind home plate at the Wednesday, May 23, Rancho Cucamonga Quakes game. A woman was struck by a flying bat at a May 13 game at LoanMart Field. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers’ Justin Turner hits a double during a Thursday, May 17, game against the Miami Marlins in Florida.  Days earlier, on May 13, his bat flew into the stands at LoanMart Field during a minor league rehabilitation appearance and struck a woman in the head.
(Wilfredo Lee, AP file photo)

    Los Angeles Dodgers’ Justin Turner hits a double during a Thursday, May 17, game against the Miami Marlins in Florida. Days earlier, on May 13, his bat flew into the stands at LoanMart Field during a minor league rehabilitation appearance and struck a woman in the head. (Wilfredo Lee, AP file photo)

  • Chino Hills resident Cloey Heckendorn, 27, was struck by a bat that slipped from Los Angeles Dodgers’ third baseman Justin Turner’s hands during his Sunday, May 13, appearance at a Rancho Cucamonga Quakes game.
Photo courtesy of Cloey Heckendorn

    Chino Hills resident Cloey Heckendorn, 27, was struck by a bat that slipped from Los Angeles Dodgers’ third baseman Justin Turner’s hands during his Sunday, May 13, appearance at a Rancho Cucamonga Quakes game. Photo courtesy of Cloey Heckendorn

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Though rare, the incident again highlights the issue of fan safety in baseball, which sends speeding foul balls — and sometimes bats — into the seats.

In September, a young girl sitting near the third-base dugout was hit in the face by a foul ball at Yankee Stadium in New York City. Months after the incident, which hospitalized her, Major League Baseball announced that its 30 teams would be extending protective netting.

Typically, it was strung from the inner edge of the third-base dugout, behind home plate and to the beginning of the first-base dugout. Now, netting covers the entire area behind home plate and both dugouts. 

Though minor-league teams aren’t required to follow the majors’ recent changes in netting, the Quakes and several other Southern California teams meet, and sometimes exceed, the recommendations set forth by Minor League Baseball.

Jeff Lantz, senior director of communications for Minor League Baseball, declined to comment on whether the minor leagues would update its netting recommendation to what’s now used in the major leagues.

Since 2015, Minor League Baseball has recommended that its teams follow what are now the old MLB guidelines on the topic, Lantz said. Those guidelines recommended netting or screens to protect fans in field-level seats between the end of both dugouts closest to home plate and within 70 feet of the catcher.

For years at LoanMart Field, home of the Quakes, the team has used netting that goes past each dugout all the way to the end of the seating in the outfield, said Grant Riddle, vice president and general manager.

“With our current setup being well beyond the recommendations, we don’t have immediate plans to make any changes,” Riddle said.

The Lake Elsinore Storm have protective netting at The Diamond stadium going past the edge of the dugouts heading into the outfield, General Manager Raj Narayanan said.

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Netting at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino, home of the Inland Empire 66ers, complies with the Minor League recommendations, Assistant General Manager Alex Groh said. The Lancaster Jethawks’ netting extends to the outer edge of the dugouts, toward the outfield.

The move for more netting has been a topic of conversation for years.

After the New York City accident, the Cincinnati Reds, San Diego Padres and Seattle Mariners said they would extend nets by the beginning of the 2018 season. Then, in February, Commissioner Rob Manfred announced all MLB teams would expand their netting.

For Heckendorn, the incident almost didn’t happen.

She went to the ballpark after learning her niece wanted to see Turner — one of the Dodgers’ star players — take the field locally.

As Turner’s bat approached, Heckendorn’s brother yelled out her name.

Heckendorn said she put up her hand as a shield. But it and her brother’s glove weren’t enough to stop the knob of Turner’s bat from striking her about an inch above her forehead.

“No one had anything to catch a bat,” she said by phone Wednesday, May 23.

Heckendorn said she looked at the ground and saw drops of blood.

“I had felt so nauseated that I didn’t even want to get up and try to walk,” she said.

After an on-site medical technician and stadium employees rushed to help her, Heckendorn rode in an ambulance to San Antonio Regional Hospital in Upland, where she received 10 staples.

The Quakes reached out to Heckendorn’s family afterward, Riddle said.

Turner signed a bat and gave it to Heckendorn and her family, Riddle and Dodgers spokesman Jon Chapper said. Riddle added that Heckendorn’s family is welcome to free tickets to another Quakes game.

But Heckendorn said her family felt like the team could have done more than offer an autographed bat after what she experienced.

Heckendorn, who didn’t know the total cost of her medical care, plans to talk to an attorney to see if there’s grounds to sue.

“I don’t want a bunch of money — just the medical bills paid for,” she said.

NETTING 101

Minor League Baseball: Follows the 2015 Major League Baseball recommendations, which call for protective nets strung from the inner edge of the third-base dugout, behind home plate and to the beginning of the first-base dugout and within 70 feet of home plate.

Major League Baseball: All 30 teams have a semi-circle of netting that covers the entire area behind home plate and both dugouts.

Local minor league teams: Local teams meet or exceed the Minor League Baseball netting recommendations.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/fan-hit-by-flying-bat-at-rancho-cucamonga-quakes-game-raises-baseball-safety-question/

Ask the Builder: Why your asphalt shingles are falling apart

Q: Tim, I’m beside myself. My expensive asphalt shingles that have a 30-year warranty are less than 10 years old and starting to curl. I see lots of roofs around me doing the same. I never recall observing this type of defect in all my past houses with asphalt shingles. Did I get a bad batch? What’s going on? –Charlie, Raleigh, N.C.

A: Do your curled shingles look like the asphalt potato chips up on Charlie’s roof? Guess what, it happened to me. My own 30-year-warranty asphalt shingles started to fall apart in nine years and suffered a catastrophic failure just a few years later.

I was so angry I decided to reach out to the national association that represents most of the asphalt shingle manufacturers. They rebuffed me. I then tried to interview the top three USA shingle manufacturers. Two refused to answer my questions and the third company put so much spin on their answers I got dizzy reading them.

By this time I was so infuriated I decided to see how widespread the defective shingle problem was. You may have participated in my national survey over two years ago. The results were so shocking I decided to write a short book about why your asphalt shingles are falling apart. The book is titled “Roofing Ripoff.”

My research indicated the problem is happening all across the USA. In my opinion, it appears many of the shingle manufacturers are blowing too much air into the liquid asphalt at their factories. You need to blow some air into the asphalt, just enough so the black brew doesn’t drip from your roof on a hot summer day.

But blow too much air into the asphalt and you pre-age the shingles. Imagine opening a fresh pack of shingles only to discover they already have twenty, or more, years of wear built into them. It sounds like you got some of these poor-quality products.

I discovered something that can save you and millions of other homeowners billions of dollars. While doing research for “Roofing Ripoff,” I discovered that copper ions react with asphalt molecules, slowing down the aging process.

It’s been known for centuries that copper prevents algae and moss buildup on roofs and ship hulls, but I was the first to recognize copper can make asphalt shingles last 40, 50 or even more years! How cool is that?

You just have to put a 12-inch wide roll of very thin copper on top of the cap shingles that run across the ridge of your roof and any hips. The copper dulls down to an attractive medium nut brown in as little as four months so you don’t even see it.

Each time it rains, some of the tiny copper ions wash down onto the shingles. The copper bonds to the asphalt and prevents one asphalt molecule from connecting to an adjacent asphalt molecule. If too many asphalt molecules link together like a long freight train, the colored granules fall off and cause the shingles to curl up like a cat taking a nap. The copper ensures your roof will outlast your ownership of your home.

You must use solid copper nails to attach the discrete copper strip to your cap shingles. The copper is the same width as the cap shingles and will not interfere with any ridge ventilation products.

You can read the first three chapters of my Roofing Ripoff book for free. Go to: roofingripoff.com

Q: Tim, can you settle a disagreement between my husband and me? He wants to use a pressure washer to clean our gorgeous wood deck. I’m convinced that the concentrated pressure will harm the wood. He says it’s all about how far you hold the wand away from the wood and the degree of the tip of the tool wand. What say you? –Terri, St. Paul, Minn.

A: Terri, you’re right. Pressure washers can wreak havoc with the soft fibers of wood, especially the light-colored bands of spring wood you see in all species of wood. Water that just flows over rock under no pressure other than its own weight scours solid granite. Just look at the Grand Canyon. Water spewing from a machine at 2,500 pounds per square inch is just too much.

Your husband does have a point with respect to the distance and tip size. Have him use a 40-degree tip and hold the wand at least 16 inches away. See what happens. The closer the tip gets to the wood, the more damage you’ll be doing.

Watch a short video showing the damage pressure washers do to treated lumber. Go to: go.askthebuilder.com/pressure

(Tim Carter can call you on the phone for FREE to solve your problem. Go to his website and fill out the form on this page: https://www.askthebuilder.com/ask-tim/.)

(c)2018 TIM CARTER DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/ask-the-builder-why-your-asphalt-shingles-are-falling-apart/

Recipe: Cornmeal johnnycakes are a satisfying dish even kids can make

Call them johnnycakes if you like. Others may refer to them as hoecakes or Shawnee cakes, but no matter the tag, they are a delicious corn-spiked treat. They can be slathered with traditional pancake toppings. Or served alongside eggs or meat they can be simply topped with butter and a smidgen of salt.

According to Carolyn Federman, the author “New Favorites for New Cooks” (Ten Speed, $19.99), the crisp-on-the-edge pleasures are a great choice for children to cook with some guidance from an adult. The recipe is written in a way to make the process foolproof and easy for a youngster to follow.

Cornmeal johnnycakes can served the same way as pancakes or simply toppoed with butter and a little salt. (Photo by Aubrie Pick)
Cornmeal johnnycakes can served the same way as pancakes or simply toppoed with butter and a little salt. (Photo by Aubrie Pick)

Kid-Made Silver Dollar Johnnycakes

Yield: makes 8

INGREDIENTS

1 cup medium-ground cornmeal

1 tablespoon granulated sugar

1 teaspoon coarse salt

1 cup milk

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more for the griddle

1 egg

For serving: honey, jam, syrup or fresh fruit

Cook’s notes: When testing this recipe, I used Albers Yellow Corn Meal. The johhnycakes were delicious, but because of the finer grind, the batter was fairly thick rather than liquid-y as described in the recipe.

PROCEDURE

1. In medium bowl, combine cornmeal, sugar and salt; stir to mix.

2. In small saucepan over medium-high heat, combine milk and 2 tablespoons butter; warm until butter melts and milk becomes frothy (lots of bubbles), and then remove from heat.

3. Pour milk mixture over cornmeal mixture; mix until cornmeal is wet. Set aside for 10 minutes, so cornmeal soaks in more of the milk.

4. Meanwhile, crack the egg into a small bowl and remove any shell with a spoon. Beat lightly with a fork to break up the yolk. When cornmeal has rested (all of milk should be absorbed), add whisked egg and mix well. The batter will be quite liquid-y, not thick like normal pancakes (see cook’s notes).

5. Warm a griddle or skillet to medium-high and grease with a dab (1 teaspoon or so) of butter. When butter sizzles, pour batter, 2 tablespoons at a time, onto the griddle and cook for 1 to 2 minutes. When small bubbles appear on the sides and top of the cakes, flip each one over with a spatula and cook for another 2 minutes. The sides should be crispy and the cakes well browned. Stack the cakes on a plate as they finish cooking, and cover with a clean kitchen towel until they are all done. Turn off the griddle.

6. Top with honey, jam, syrup or fresh fruit.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/26/recipe-cornmeal-johnnycakes-are-a-satisfying-dish-even-kids-can-make/

CIF-SS baseball playoffs: Friday’s scores, updated semifinals schedule

Scores from Friday’s CIF-SS baseball playoff games, and the updated schedule.

BASEBALL

DIVISION 1

Quarterfinals, Friday

Bishop Amat 5, Cypress 2

Foothill 3, Etiwanda 0

Capistrano Valley 3, Dos Pueblos 2 (8 inn.)

Quarterfinal, Saturday

Gahr vs. Orange Lutheran, at Hart Park, 7 p.m.

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 29, 3:15 p.m.

Foothill at Bishop Amat

Capistrano Valley at TBD

DIVISION 2

Quarterfinals, Friday

Beckman 7, Calabasas 2

Camarillo 6, Sierra Canyon 0

Yucaipa 5, Crescenta Valley 3

Ayala 1, Alemany 0

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 29, 3:15 p.m.

Beckman at Camarillo

Yucaipa at Ayala

DIVISION 3

Quarterfinals, Friday

Maranatha 11, Arlington 2

Redlands 6, San Dimas 0

La Salle 6, Temescal Canyon 0

Long Beach Wilson 4, Bellflower 2

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 29, 3:15 p.m.

Maranatha at Redlands

Long Beach Wilson at La Salle

DIVISION 4

Quarterfinals, Friday

La Quinta 1, La Serna 0

Windward 12, Victor Valley 1

Monrovia 9, Northview 6

Hemet 4, Grand Terrace 3 (8 inn.)

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 29, 3:15 p.m.

La Quinta at Windward

Hemet at Monrovia

DIVISION 5

Quarterfinals, Friday

Garey 5, Summit 2

Malibu 4, Sunny Hills 0

El Rancho 3, Muir 0

Temple City 5, Ontario Christian 4 (8 inn.)

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 29, 3:15 p.m.

Malibu at Garey

Temple City at El Rancho

DIVISION 6

Quarterfinals, Friday

Pasadena Poly 10, Ganesha 4

Pomona 10, Bishop Diego 1

Moreno Valley 1, St. Bernard 0

Silverado 11, El Monte 2

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 29, 3:15 p.m.

Pomona at Pasadena Poly

Moreno Valley at Silverado

DIVISION 7

Quarterfinals, Friday

Fillmore 2, University Prep 0

Orange Vista 15, La Verne Lutheran 2

Trinity Classical 5, Upland Christian 2

de Toledo 10, Academy for Careers and Exploration 2

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 29, 3:15 p.m.

Orange Vista at Fillmore

de Toledo at Trinity Classical

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/25/cif-ss-baseball-playoffs-fridays-scores-updated-semifinals-schedule/