Fred Swegles

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Feb 21

San Clemente news briefs: ‘San Clemente Day,’ golf pro, world record and more

  • Two year old Grace is a recent mom who raised six puppies and is now finally ready for a home of her own. Her handlers at the San Clemente/Dana Point Animal Shelter describe her as a fun and energetic dog. For adoption info, call the shelter at 949-492-1617 or visit her at 221 Avenida Fabricante, San Clemente. (Courtesy of animal shelter)

    Two year old Grace is a recent mom who raised six puppies and is now finally ready for a home of her own. Her handlers at the San Clemente/Dana Point Animal Shelter describe her as a fun and energetic dog. For adoption info, call the shelter at 949-492-1617 or visit her at 221 Avenida Fabricante, San Clemente. (Courtesy of animal shelter)

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‘San Clemente Day’ is coming Saturday, Feb. 24

If you plan to attend the city’s “San Clemente Day” festivities and take a free trolley tour of historic sites around town, you can park either at the pier or at North Beach and catch the trolleys there.

The tours, from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24, will celebrate the 90th anniversary of the city’s incorporation. Tours will make stops at Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens, the top of Avenida Del Mar and St. Clement’s Episcopal Church along the route. The trolleys will drop off and pick up passengers at the stops, the city said in a news release.

The Ole Hanson Beach Club at North Beach will host activities from noon to 6 p.m. including free recreational swimming, deck games, lawn games, synchronized swimming performances and, from 3 p.m., free birthday cake and ice cream. From noon to 3 p.m., the city will offer a $25 chicken lunch upstairs at the beach club featuring an Ole Hanson look-alike re-creating town founder Hanson’s sales pitch to prospective residents. Roaring 20s attire is encouraged.

Prior to all these activities, the city will host an 8 a.m. children’s fishing derby at the end of the pier. Beware that chicken lunch tickets are limited and may sell out.

City Council salutes local golf pro

While world-class professional golfers were drawing polite applause for their shots at the Los Angeles Open golf tournament Feb. 15-18, San Clemente’s underdog golfer Vinnie Poncino had a vigorous cheering section.

Poncino, head pro at the San Clemente Municipal Golf Course, had earned a slot in the L.A. Open by winning a local golf tournament among local pros from Southern California golf courses.

Former San Clemente Mayor Bob Baker was among dozens of San Clemente residents who drove to Riviera Country Club to cheer on Poncino.

“It was quite a sight to see,” Baker said. “Vinnie is playing with two fulltime PGA Tour guys. So they make a putt and there’s a (quiet clapping). Vinnie makes a putt, ‘YAY, ALL RIGHT VINNIE!’

“It was small-town America.”

Baker told the story at a Feb. 20 City Council meeting, where Mayor Tim Brown presented Poncino with a proclamation congratulating him for representing San Clemente. “You really did us proud,” Brown told him.

Poncino reflected on playing in front of tens of thousands of people.

“I had a rough start,” he said, “but I calmed down and played well the second day. There was a ton of San Clemente people out there, and I heard each and every one of you.”

In 2014, San Clemente's Beth Sanden was pictured being honored on the podium at the Rome Marathon in Italy. (Courtesy of Beth Sanden)
In 2014, San Clemente’s Beth Sanden was pictured being honored on the podium at the Rome Marathon in Italy. (Courtesy of Beth Sanden)

Sanden awarded record for handcycle marathons

The website officialworldrecord.com has awarded partly paralyzed athlete Beth Sanden of San Clemente a world record, naming her as the first woman to complete marathons on seven continents plus the North Pole on a handcycle.

Between 2012 and 2017, the 62-year-old athlete, paralyzed below the waist in a cycling accident in 2002, completed marathons in Africa, Tasmania, Peru, Rome, Boston, Antarctica, Vietnam and the North Pole. Her documented finishing times ranged from 2 hours, 22 minutes in Boston to 10 hours, 58 minutes in Antarctica, the website said.

Jazz concert at San Clemente High

Music lovers can tap their feet and sway to two varieties of jazz on March 3 when the San Clemente High School Jazz Band and the school’s Latin Jazz combo perform on campus.

“Jazz on Pico Nightclub” is the title of the concert. Shows will be offered at 5 p.m. and at 6:30 p.m. in the school’s Triton Center, with volunteers offering appetizers, desserts and drinks as a fundraiser for the music program. Admission is a $10 cover charge plus purchase of at least one item.

“The jazzman will present big band music while the Latin jazz combo will play many salsa-inspired pieces,” Band Director Tony Soto said.

The school is at 700 Avenida Pico, San Clemente.

Dance team offers clinic March 6

Middle school and high school students interested in trying out for the San Clemente High School dance team can attend a Teen Skills and Evaluation Clinic from 4 to 6:30 p.m. March 6 in the dance room on campus.

The fee is $50. A registration form is available at schsdanceteam.com, with onsite registration starting a half-hour before the clinic.

It’s a chance for dance hopefuls to practice with the current team and learn some dance combinations.

“Coaches will be observing the dancers and providing a written evaluation in the mail after the clinic, highlighting strengths and offering suggestions for areas to improve before the team’s tryouts scheduled for April 10-13,” the team said in a news release.

Hospital support group offers bingo

Bingo lovers are invited to an 11 a.m. luncheon March 15 at Bella Collina Golf Club, hosted by Los Niños Guild of Children’s Hospital of Orange County.

The event will begin with a social hour, then lunch and bingo at noon plus prize drawings and a silent auction. Admission is a $50 donation. Proceeds will benefit CHOC at Mission Hospital.

Visit losninosguild.com to register online.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/21/san-clemente-news-briefs-san-clemente-day-golf-pro-world-record-and-more/

Feb 21

Transportation planners propose extending I-5 carpool lanes to O.C.’s southern border

A new push for north-south traffic relief could be in store for south Orange County with the latest incarnation of the Orange County Transportation Authority’s Long Range Transportation Plan.

It includes a $237 million proposal to extend carpool lanes on Interstate 5 from Avenida Pico to the San Diego County line, San Clemente City Council members were told at their Feb. 20 meeting.

Councilwoman Lori Donchak, who represents San Clemente on the OCTA board, reported that the updated countywide plan identifies future transportation projects in two categories – proposed or conceptual. The I-5 widening to the county line is on the “proposed” list and, for the first time, has a cost estimate attached to it, Donchak said.

“It is significant that it has been added in,” she said, “because Measure M (a countywide half-cent sales tax for transportation) is voter-approved and the money is committed at the time when the vote is taken.”

She said the project is being put forward as an extension of a $230 million Measure M-assisted I-5 widening that is due for completion in March, having been under construction for four years. That project is adding 5.7 miles of carpool lanes to I-5 between San Juan Capistrano and San Clemente. A ribbon-cutting is in the works, Donchak said.

That project began at Camino Capistrano in San Juan Capistrano and is ending just past Avenida Pico in San Clemente. The new project, Donchak said, would carry the carpool lanes south through San Clemente to the Orange County line at the Cristianitos Road exit.

Donchak said she was conveying information presented to OCTA board members Feb. 12.

She also reported that a proposed extension of the 241 Toll Road south from Oso Parkway does not appear in the Long Range Transportation Plan. “The 241 extension appears on neither list,” she said, “which is a difference from prior Long Range Transportation Plans.”

Earlier versions of the Long Range Transportation Plan, she explained, showed a state-approved route for the 241 behind San Clemente to San Onofre that has been abandoned.

Donchak said a proposal to connect the north end of the 241 Toll Road with the 91 Freeway’s express lanes does appear in the plan, with a cost estimate of $180 million.

“Riverside and Orange County have both asked the Transportation Corridor Agencies to take a pause on that project,” she said. “In spirit, it was a pause, not a stop.”

Donchak also reported that OCTA is accepting applications for $12 million in grants to help Orange County cities provide summer trolleys that offer free rides to the public. Grant applications are due March 23, she said, and San Clemente city staff is working up a proposal.

San Clemente launched its first summer trolley in 2017. An OCTA grant funded most of the costs. The city has been discussing enhancements – including a potential connection to Dana Point’s trolley, which in turn connects to trolleys in San Juan Capistrano and Laguna Beach.

Donchak said she believes San Clemente’s trolley is in a good position for an added grant, since the city’s first-year program averaged 46 boardings per service hour, tops among 15 trolley systems across the county. Laguna Beach was second with 34 hourly boardings, Lake Forest third with 21, she reported.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/21/transportation-planners-propose-extending-i-5-carpool-lanes-to-o-c-s-southern-border/

Feb 21

Suggestion for use of “story poles” in San Juan Capistrano to show size of proposed projects didn’t get council interest

Councilwoman Pam Patterson’s bid to have developers in San Juan Capistrano erect tall wooden poles known as “story poles” to show the public the magnitude of proposed buildings failed to catch on with the City Council.

Residents have a right to see the height and breadth of a proposed building and its impact on views and on neighborhoods, Patterson told her fellow council members Feb. 6 in her argument to put in place rules similar to nearby Laguna Beach. The council took no action.

Patterson suggested the city should require the story poles for all development, whether it’s new construction or an addition.

Councilman Brian Maryott said the council already has the power to require story poles on an as-needed basis when developers apply for a zoning change or a change to the city’s general plan. City Manager Ben Siegel confirmed the city can require the visuals be put in place.

In Laguna Beach, story poles are erected 28 days prior to a design review hearing, Siegel said.

Mayor Sergio Farias suggested poles could end up staying much longer if there are issues with a particular project. He wondered how story poles would look if left up for an extended period next to a historic site such as Mission San Juan Capistrano.

Councilwoman Kerry Ferguson said an accurate model, done to scale, is more helpful. “It’s a lot more illustrative,” Ferguson said.

Resident Steve Behmerwohld told the council he has no problem with story poles, just with what critics of a project could do with them, such as changing the perspective of a project by the angle of pictures taken of story poles.

Resident Michael Laux said story poles are a great tool used by neighboring cities. He said developers’ sketches of projects often are not to scale, but surveyor-certified story poles are very accurate, able to show view impediment or preservation.

“I think it’s good for all the projects,” he said. “It’s three-dimensional. You can walk up; you can see exactly what the impact is going to be.”

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/21/suggestion-for-use-of-story-poles-in-san-juan-capistrano-to-show-size-of-proposed-projects-didnt-get-council-interest/

Feb 20

Rats, ballerinas and a Bernedoodle dazzle in San Juan Capistrano’s Kids’ Pet Parade

Jenna Rajamaki wore a “Rats Rule” shirt to the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s 2018 Kids’ Pet Parade on Saturday, Feb. 17, with the intended result.

Her pet rats, Gizmo and Stripe, charmed the judges, who awarded them first prize in the “exotic pets” division of the parade held in in Los Rios Park.

But it was Haven Harris and her dog, Ava, both dressed as ballerinas, who won over the judges’ best over all. Haven and Ava captured first prize in the “best costumes” division plus the grand prize at the pet parade, an invitation to appear as celebrities in the Fiesta de las Golondrinas’ 60th annual Swallows Day Parade.

  • Keira Baker shows off her dog, Scout, during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Keira Baker shows off her dog, Scout, during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • A dog dressed as a bumblebee barks while waiting for the start of the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    A dog dressed as a bumblebee barks while waiting for the start of the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Keilani Harris talks about her dog, Boris during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Keilani Harris talks about her dog, Boris during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Megyn Whitbeck waits for the start of the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Megyn Whitbeck waits for the start of the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Haven Harris poses for a photo with her 1st place ribbon during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Haven Harris poses for a photo with her 1st place ribbon during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Savannah Erca gets questioned by host, Jim Taylor during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Savannah Erca gets questioned by host, Jim Taylor during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Jenna Rajamaki reveals her pet rat during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Jenna Rajamaki reveals her pet rat during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Haven Harris gets her dog, Ava, to do tricks during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Haven Harris gets her dog, Ava, to do tricks during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Harrison Taylor, left, poses for a photo with his son Jack and their dog Ella before the the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Harrison Taylor, left, poses for a photo with his son Jack and their dog Ella before the the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Host of the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade, Jim Taylor announces the categories during the event in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Host of the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade, Jim Taylor announces the categories during the event in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Judge Addison Williams smiles during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Judge Addison Williams smiles during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Savannah Erca competes with her dog, JoJo during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Savannah Erca competes with her dog, JoJo during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Laughter erupts during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Laughter erupts during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Keilani Harris, left, and Haven Harris wait for the start of the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade with their dog, Boris, in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Keilani Harris, left, and Haven Harris wait for the start of the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade with their dog, Boris, in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Ava, dressed as a ballerina and with pink nails, squints in the sun during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. She was the day’s overall winner. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Ava, dressed as a ballerina and with pink nails, squints in the sun during the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. She was the day’s overall winner. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

  • Ann Stone smiles as she competes in the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade with her pony pal, Vaquero, in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

    Ann Stone smiles as she competes in the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s annual Kids’ Pet Parade with her pony pal, Vaquero, in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (Photo by Foster SnellContributing Photographer)

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That event, billed as one of America’s largest non-motorized parades, will be at 11 a.m. March 24 through downtown San Juan Capistrano, celebrating the annual return of swallows, a swarm of migratory birds that fly for 30 days every spring from South America to California to build nests and spend their summers in San Juan and nearby.

Some 20 entries paraded through Los Rios Park to compete in this year’s pet parade, and it wasn’t just kids with pets this time. The fiesta association added a “Kid at Heart” division for for pet owners 60 years or older. Boots Leone and his dog, Batgirl, took the win in that division.

In the domestic pet division, Nia Dodd and Mocha were the judges’ favorites.

The judges gave a special prize, the Deputy Dog award, to Tatum Grebe and her Bernedoodle, Max, not just because Bernedoodle is such a cool name but because Tatum was dressed as a cowgirl in a town where horse culture is huge and equestrians area a big part of the Swallows Day Parade.

The Kids’ Pet Parade was one in a series of events running up to the March 24 parade. Next event is the El Presidente Ball, a 6 to 10 p.m. gala dinner with live music and dancing on March 17 at El Adobe Restaurant celebrating San Juan’s place in the birth of California and the state’s early history. Many of the attendees will dress in early California attire.

Tickets are $65 in advance and $75 at the door if still available then.

Visit swallowsparade.com for details and tickets or call 949-493-1976.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/20/rats-ballerinas-and-a-bernedoodle-dazzle-in-san-juan-capistranos-kids-pet-parade/

Feb 20

Exhibit with works of Dutch painter Paul Van Ernich opens with reception Feb 27

Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens describes Paul Van Ernich as “a Dutch painter whose old-master-style paintings include hauntingly beautiful still lifes.”

The cultural center will host an exhibit of his works Feb. 27 through March 16. Those who arrive on opening night for a reception will be rewarded with free admission and complimentary wine and cheese.

IF YOU GO

When: 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 27

Where: 415 Avenida Granada, San Clemente

What: Opening-night reception for an art exhibit to be on display daily except Mondays through March 16, included in the $5 price of general admission to the Casa during regular visiting hours

Details: Visit casaromantica.org or call 949-498-2139

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/19/exhibit-with-works-of-dutch-painter-paul-van-ernich-opens-with-reception-feb-27/

Feb 20

19th century vineyard provides setting for musical melodrama in San Juan

Did you know that Orange County, in the 1800s, had more than 50 vineyards? Learn a bit of the background and hold onto your seat as you enjoy what Camino Real Playhouse proclaims is the rollicking, “mostly true story” of a vineyard, its heroine and a villain who schemes to cheat her.

The musical melodrama, titled “Villainy in the Vineyard,” opened Feb. 16 at Camino Real Playhouse and continues this weekend and next, with four shows each week.

IF YOU GO

When: 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 23; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24; and 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 25; same schedule the following week

Where: Camino Real Playhouse, 31776 El Camino Real, San Juan Capistrano

Tickets: $27 and $37

To order: Visit caminorealplayhouse.org or call 949-489-8082

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/19/19th-century-vineyard-provides-setting-for-musical-melodrama-in-san-juan/

Feb 19

San Clemente salutes exemplary residents, businesses and more

  • Assemblyman Bill Brough, left, swears in the incoming 2018 San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Chairman Steve Ynzunza during the Chamber’s annual Awards Ceremony at the Bella Collina Towne and Golf Club on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Assemblyman Bill Brough, left, swears in the incoming 2018 San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Chairman Steve Ynzunza during the Chamber’s annual Awards Ceremony at the Bella Collina Towne and Golf Club on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • The 2018 San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Board Members hold up their right hands as they take an oath of office during the Chamber’s annual Awards Dinner on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    The 2018 San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Board Members hold up their right hands as they take an oath of office during the Chamber’s annual Awards Dinner on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Carson Kropfl, founder of Locker Board Skateboards, accepts his award from the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce for Young Entrepreneur of the Year during the annual Awards Dinner on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Carson Kropfl, founder of Locker Board Skateboards, accepts his award from the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce for Young Entrepreneur of the Year during the annual Awards Dinner on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Educator of the Year Sarah McKeon, center, stands with Shorecliffs Middle School Principal Dr. Brad Baker, members of her family, and other dignitaries, while accepting the award during Thursday’s Awards Dinner at the Bella Collina Towne and Golf Club on February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Educator of the Year Sarah McKeon, center, stands with Shorecliffs Middle School Principal Dr. Brad Baker, members of her family, and other dignitaries, while accepting the award during Thursday’s Awards Dinner at the Bella Collina Towne and Golf Club on February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • The 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines Color Guard presents the flag during the National Anthem at the annual San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Award Ceremony on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    The 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines Color Guard presents the flag during the National Anthem at the annual San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Award Ceremony on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • 2018 San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Chairman Steve Ynzunza holds up his gavel after being sworn into the position at the Bella Collina Towne and Golf Club on Thursday, February 15, 2018 during the Chamber’s annual Awards dinner. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    2018 San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Chairman Steve Ynzunza holds up his gavel after being sworn into the position at the Bella Collina Towne and Golf Club on Thursday, February 15, 2018 during the Chamber’s annual Awards dinner. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Taka-O Japanese Restaurant owners Roger and Kelly Sugano accept the award for Business of the Year at the annual Awards Dinner for the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Taka-O Japanese Restaurant owners Roger and Kelly Sugano accept the award for Business of the Year at the annual Awards Dinner for the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year Stephanie Aguilar stands with her husband, Ryan Aguilar, left, and Skatepark Coalition Board Member Andrew Steelman, after accepting the award at the annual Chamber of Commerce Awards Dinner on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year Stephanie Aguilar stands with her husband, Ryan Aguilar, left, and Skatepark Coalition Board Member Andrew Steelman, after accepting the award at the annual Chamber of Commerce Awards Dinner on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Barbara Barnes accepts the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce’s 2017 Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award for her service to the local community and military support groups during the annual San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Award Dinner at the Bella Collina Towne and Golf Club on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Barbara Barnes accepts the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce’s 2017 Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award for her service to the local community and military support groups during the annual San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Award Dinner at the Bella Collina Towne and Golf Club on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Barbara Barnes, center, accepts the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce’s 2017 Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award for her service to the local community and military support groups during the annual San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Award Dinner at the Bella Collina Towne and Golf Club on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Barbara Barnes, center, accepts the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce’s 2017 Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award for her service to the local community and military support groups during the annual San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Award Dinner at the Bella Collina Towne and Golf Club on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Ambassador Vicky Wilson introduces Dr. Lance Larson, of Larson Corporation Inc., while recognizing him as the Chamber’s Volunteer of the Year for his cyber security assistance to the Chamber and the city during the annual Awards Dinner on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Ambassador Vicky Wilson introduces Dr. Lance Larson, of Larson Corporation Inc., while recognizing him as the Chamber’s Volunteer of the Year for his cyber security assistance to the Chamber and the city during the annual Awards Dinner on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Ambassador Shauna Hunt accepts the award for the 2017 Ambassador of the Year during the annual Awards Dinner on Thursday evening, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Ambassador Shauna Hunt accepts the award for the 2017 Ambassador of the Year during the annual Awards Dinner on Thursday evening, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

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Stephanie Aguilar, founder and president of the San Clemente Skatepark Coalition, thought she was just going to a Chamber of Commerce networking event.

“I said, OK, let’s go!” she said.

She had no idea how big the event would be – filling the banquet hall at Bella Collina Town & Golf Club with nattily dressed dignitaries and even state legislators – or that she would emerge as the evening’s guest of honor, named San Clemente’s Citizen of the Year.

It has been a Chamber of Commerce tradition for decades, finding ways to trick the Citizen of the Year into attending the banquet, only to be ambushed with a surprise award.

“I just kind of went with it,” Aguilar said.

The chamber honored her for her group’s campaign to partner with the city and the Friends of San Clemente Foundation to add lights to Ralphs Skate Court, to add more skateboard facilities on an adjacent vacant lot and to find ways to provide additional skate opportunities for San Clemente youth elsewhere around town.

“I want to say that it takes a team,” she told the audience. “I’m very surprised and honored. And definitely, if any sponsors would like to come forward, we’d love to talk to you!”

Skateboarding proved to be a theme for the evening as the chamber named Carson Kropfl, 12-year-old inventor of the Locker Board, as San Clemente’s Entrepreneur of the Year.

He told the audience that his business has jumped 300 percent since last fall, when international business icon Sir Richard Branson cut a $65,000 deal with him on television’s “Shark Tank.”

San Clemente Mayor Tim Brown was impressed. “I was still playing with G.I. Joes when I was 12,” the mayor said.

The chamber named Shorecliffs Middle School teacher Sarah McKeon San Clemente’s Educator of the Year, citing her initiatives to help struggling students learn, her problem-solving skills and her creativity in the classroom. “Sarah’s students repeatedly say her class is their favorite,” the chamber said.

The chamber saluted Roger and Kelly Sugano’s Takao Restaurant as San Clemente’s Business of the Year, calling it a local favorite since 1980 and supporter of local charities.

Kelly Sugano, recalling decades of karaoke, birthdays and weddings and recognizing many faces in the audience, remarked with a grin, “If these walls could talk, half of you would be in trouble!”

Barbara Barnes accepted a Lifetime Achievement Award as a career educator of nationwide acclaim who settled in San Clemente in 1997, served as principal at Camp Pendleton’s San Onofre School and has since launched volunteer initiatives through San Clemente Presbyterian Church to assist Marine Corps students and families on the base as well as programs to combat human trafficking.

“It’s a pleasure to serve our Marines because they are serving us so well,” she said.

The chamber seated a new board of directors and installed Steve Ynunza as new chairman of the board. The chamber saluted Lance Larson as its Volunteer of the Year and Shauna Hunt as Ambassador of the Year.

Larson was cited for helping the chamber with cybersecurity issues, Hunt innovations with chamber outreaches.

California Senator Pat Bates acts as Master of Ceremonies during the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Award Dinner on Thursday evening, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)
California Senator Pat Bates acts as Master of Ceremonies during the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Award Dinner on Thursday evening, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/19/san-clemente-salutes-exemplary-residents-businesses-and-more/

Feb 19

Irvine police seek help in locating man

Irvine police are asking the public’s help in locating a man who went missing at around 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 18, outside the 99 Ranch Market on Culver Drive.

Police Lt. James Hutchcraft said that Yang Tun, 80, was with family members before he evidently walked away unnoticed. He is described as 5-foot-7-inches, 130 pounds, last seen wearing a red zip-up sweater and black pants with a green stripe on the sides.

Anyone with information is asked to call Irvine Police Department at 949-724-7000.

 

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/18/irvine-police-seek-help-in-locating-man/

Feb 19

Motorcyclist injured in Beach Boulevard collision

WESTMINSTER A motorcyclist was in stable condition at an area hospital Sunday, Feb. 18, following a collision on Beach Boulevard near the 22 Freeway.

Police said the 8 a.m. crash occurred as a car was exiting the 22 Freeway, turning right onto Beach Boulevard. Police were unable to say which vehicle struck the other or what caused the crash. The collision was under investigation.

Neither driver was identified. Both were reported to be adult males. The driver of the car was not reported hurt, and Westminster police said he cooperated with investigators. There was no evidence of intoxication by either party.

Orange County Fire Authority paramedics transported the motorcyclist to an area trauma center.

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/18/motorcyclist-injured-in-beach-boulevard-collision/

Feb 16

Dr. Tommy John pitches advice for kids and parents on preventing sports injuries

Message to parents: Dr. Tommy John doesn’t want your child to suffer the injury that nearly ended his famous father’s major league baseball career.

Fifty-seven percent of all “Tommy John” surgeries being performed today to repair damaged pitching arms are occurring in athletes 15 to 19 years old, “Dr. T.J.” told two dozen San Clemente Little Leaguers and their parents Thursday, Feb. 15.

He blamed the $15 billion youth sports industry that has children playing nonstop, year-round. And this isn’t just about Tommy John surgeries, named for the 1974 operation that saved the Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher’s career, Dr. Tommy John said. It’s about swimmers, soccer players, gymnasts, basketball players, surfers, any sport.

John, a San Diego chiropractor and wellness expert, led a Little League workout for the Reds and Yankees at San Clemente’s Vista Hermosa Sports Park.

  • Dr. Tommy John, a San Diego chiropractor, and son of the famed Dodgers pitcher of the same name, talks to young Little League players, from a few San Clemente teams, about preventing sports injuries during a clinic at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Dr. Tommy John, a San Diego chiropractor, and son of the famed Dodgers pitcher of the same name, talks to young Little League players, from a few San Clemente teams, about preventing sports injuries during a clinic at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Dr. Tommy John, a San Diego chiropractor, and son of the famed Dodgers pitcher of the same name, talks to young Little League players, from a few San Clemente teams, about preventing sports injuries during a clinic at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Dr. Tommy John, a San Diego chiropractor, and son of the famed Dodgers pitcher of the same name, talks to young Little League players, from a few San Clemente teams, about preventing sports injuries during a clinic at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Chiropractor Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, talks to a group of Little League players at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018 about ways to practice and compete safely. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Chiropractor Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, talks to a group of Little League players at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018 about ways to practice and compete safely. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Chiropractor Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, talks to a group of Little League players at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018 about ways to practice and compete safely. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Chiropractor Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, talks to a group of Little League players at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018 about ways to practice and compete safely. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, and who is writing a book for parents of young athletes about preventing sports injuries, leads a group of Little League players in what he calls “dynamic sports movements” at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Chiropractor Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, stands with a group of Little League players at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018 during a Òdynamic sports movementÓ clinic and discussion of good exercise habits. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Chiropractor Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, stands with a group of Little League players at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018 during a Òdynamic sports movementÓ clinic and discussion of good exercise habits. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Dr. Tommy John, a San Diego chiropractor, and son of the famed Dodgers pitcher of the same name, talks to young Little League players, from a few San Clemente teams, about preventing sports injuries during a clinic at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Dr. Tommy John, a San Diego chiropractor, and son of the famed Dodgers pitcher of the same name, talks to young Little League players, from a few San Clemente teams, about preventing sports injuries during a clinic at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park on Thursday, February 15, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Chiropractor Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, talks to a group of Little League players at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018 about ways to practice and compete safely. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Chiropractor Dr. Tommy John, who specializes in injury prevention and healing, talks to a group of Little League players at the Vista Hermosa Sports Park in San Clemente on Friday, February 15, 2018 about ways to practice and compete safely. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

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His appearance was at the request of a friend, Erin Brown, who coaches the Reds. She described John to her players as “a guru of the body.”

Children age 9 to 11 followed him through exercises designed to balance the body and help make it more resistant to sports injuries.

The kids giggled – one repeatedly shouted, “Boing!” – as John’s exercises simulated how he said the body, from infancy, was supposed to develop.

In one exercise, the kids tried to hold one leg up in front of them for a minute and a half, then the other leg. The comical result had the kids laughing at themselves, struggling to balance the grounded leg vs. the wobbly, dangling other leg.

“When you bounce,” John told the kids, leading them in a routine, “every muscle in your body is firing.

“I do these,” he said, “when I fill up for gas.”

John is the author of “Minimize Injury, Maximize Performance: A Sport’s Parents Survival Guide,” due out June 5 on Amazon and Barnes and Noble. He also runs the Dr. Tommy John Performance and Healing Center,” offering a holistic approach to athletes and to people in all walks of life.

What have you learned in 17 chiropractic years dealing with young athletes?

All sports are seeing injury epidemics: concussions, ACL surgeries, mental health imbalances and Tommy John surgery. Kids today at 10-12 years old who play a variety of sports are coming in with issues I should be seeing in a 50- to 60-year-old. The American training system is trying to increase ability at the expense of durability. Youth athletes today are overstimulated and less aware, overtrained and underdeveloped, overcoached and underprepared, overfed and malnourished.

What does your book offer?

Finally, a solution every parent, player, coach, athlete of any age can pick up and implement to create a life that they don’t have to rehab from: 4-Step Plan: Rethink, Replenish, Rebuild, Recover. The three causes of all injury epidemics. Nine tests you can do at home to see how your athlete is performing. Performance recipes that provide the ingredients missing in most athletes’ nutrition plan. A long-term athletic development training plan that corrects all imbalances that sports create.

How do you treat ailing athletes?

Regardless of who walks through my door: 58-year-old diabetic with arm pain, a 10-year-old with developmental issues, a pro athlete rehabbing from surgery or someone who wants to prevent any problems from ever occurring in the first place, I assess the brain/body connection and deliver specific chiropractic care when needed. I find exactly what muscles aren’t doing their job effectively so I can create a plan for each individual. Then educate about the impact our emotional, physical and chemical health choices have on our body’s ability to perform at anything and heal from the source.

What led to the rise in Tommy John surgeries?

Parents are being scared into competing in travel and tournament play because it will increase the skill of their son/daughter, which isn’t scientifically how it works. We are playing year-round in all sports. We are overstimulated by technology abuse that is dimming motor programs, shutting down muscles, decreasing the immune function in kids. We are overtraining in the American training system of bigger, faster, stronger, increased ability at the expense of durability.

What does your dad think of all this?

Dad is sick that his name is attached to something that is affecting kids now more than the pros. He wrote the forward of my book and goes into exactly this question. But in his day, just like almost every high-level athlete we all watch on TV today, especially the Olympians, they played all the time. Technology wasn’t available to analyze every degree of every swing or throw. He is behind every inch of the solutions offered in the book. He realizes that whatever steps are being taken to prevent injury in all youth sports isn’t working.

What is your message for parents?

It’s time to rethink our current approach to the business of youth sports and make sure the reason your child is competing is because they love it and are having fun. Sports at this time in a child’s life are supposed to develop movement skills, brain centers for memory, creativity and focus. They are supposed to be fun and enjoyed. They teach how to handle adversity and how to communicate and work well with others. There is nothing to fear. The solution is in your hands. Always has been.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/16/dr-tommy-john-pitches-advice-for-kids-and-parents-on-preventing-sports-injuries/

Feb 15

San Clemente news briefs: Mobile app, I-5 closures, surf exhibit and more

Board the bus with a mobile device

The Orange County Transportation is offering mobile ticketing on all of its buses.

Effective Sunday, Feb. 11, all buses in the OCTA fleet became capable of accepting payment via passengers’ smartphones or other connected mobile device, OCTA said in a news release.

Take your smartphone or other connected device onto the bus, with the OC Bus app already installed and set up. Scan it into a reader.

The app, available for iPhone and Android, was launched in 2017, OCTA said. Learn more at ocbus.com/mobile.

San Clemente golf pro in L.A. Open

San Clemente has a local favorite to cheer on at the Los Angeles Open golf tournament this week, Feb. 15-18, at the Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades.

Vinnie Poncino, head pro at the San Clemente Municipal Golf Course, shot 68 at Hacienda Country Club to win a tournament that let area club pros compete with each other for a slot in the open. The L.A. Open began Thursday and Poncino was scheduled to compete, at minimum, the first two days.

The Professional Golfers’ Association tournament, also known as the Genesis Open, features the world’s best golfers. See genesisopen.com.

Overnight lane closures on I-5

The Orange County Transportation Authority cautions night drivers to watch for lane closures and alternating ramp closures over the next few weeks on northbound and southbound I-5 between Camino Capistrano and Avenida Pico.

“The closures will allow crews to safely remove k-rail and perform final striping on the project,” a construction alert said. “Work is expected to take place from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. weeknights. The freeway will be reduced to one lane in some instances. Motorists should expect delays.”

Bruce Brown exhibit postponed to Feb. 24

The Surfing Heritage @ Culture Center has rescheduled the opening for an exhibit saluting the late filmmaker Bruce Brown.

The exhibit was to have opened Feb. 10 at 110 Calle Iglesia, San Clemente, but the center said it needed more time to provide a more thorough look at Brown’s life and career.

The former Dana Point filmmaker’s surf movies elevated the genre and public perceptions about surfing. Brown, who died Dec. 10 in Santa Barbara at age 80, is best known for his 1964 documentary “The Endless Summer.”

Admission will be $5 for the opening reception from  6 to 9 p.m. on Feb. 24. The exhibit will continue through April. Questions? Call 949-388-0313.

‘Meet the Authors’ luncheon nears

Feb. 19 is the last day to reserve a seat for the 18th annual Meet the Authors luncheon, hosted by San Clemente’s Friends of the Library support group.

The 11:30 a.m. luncheon on Feb. 24 at Talega Golf Club will feature authors Matt Coyle, Liska Jacobs and Naomi Hirahara. The cost is $60. For tickets contact Debbie Wilkens at 949-322-4892.

Preparations for ‘San Clemente Day’

The City Council is expected to take final steps at its 6 p.m. meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 20, for a day-long Feb. 24 celebration of the 90th anniversary of San Clemente’s incorporation as a city.

Dignitaries will be at the meeting at City Hall to assist in a presentation.

The day will include a fishing derby, lifeguard exhibit, history-themed trolley tours, free swimming, birthday cake and more at the Ole Hanson Beach Club. See san-clemente.org for details.

Lifeguard tryouts coming Feb. 24

San Clemente’s municipal lifeguards are offering tryouts at 7 a.m. on Feb. 24 on the beach north of the pier.

Applicants must complete an 800-yard ocean swim within 13.5 minutes. Those who do, will then do a 1,200-yard run/swim/run, the city said in a news release.

No wetsuits, goggles, swim fins or other devices are allowed.

Applicants younger than 18 must bring a signed parental consent. Candidates must be at least 16 years old by June 30 and must undergo 92 hours of training between March 31 and May 5.

Visit san-clemente.org/jobs for a lifeguard application or apply in person at Marine Safety Headquarters. Questions? Call 949-361-8219.

Artist to host Saturday showing

San Clemente artist Tom Swimm will be on hand from 4 to 8 p.m. Feb. 17 for the opening of his exhibit “Fresh Colors” at Pacific Edge Gallery, 540 South Coast Highway in Laguna Beach.

The exhibit continues through the end of the month, Swimm said in a news release. A veteran exhibitor at the Laguna Beach Festival of Arts, Swimm announced he has completed more than 35 new works featuring his signature technique of capturing color and reflections.

Questions? Call 949-494-0491, or visit pacificedgegallery.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/15/san-clemente-news-briefs-mobile-app-i-5-closures-surf-exhibit-and-more/

Feb 14

San Clemente antique dealer built her business on friendships; now, at 86, she’ll retire to enjoy time with those friends

Tillie Domito, 86, said she isn’t worried about being lonely upon closing Plum Precious, the antique and jewelry store she has operated for 38 years in San Clemente.

“My customers at Plum Precious are all my personal, close friends,” she said.

She has no children and has outlived two husbands. Her second husband, Jack, passed away recently at 96 after 44 years of marriage. Still, she said, she has a wealth of friends, and her zest for life is as high-energy as ever.

“I will have lots of friends around me,” she said. “I’ve grown with the friends. That is what built my business.”

Tillie Domito, owner of Plum Precious, is pictured in her store in 2003. (File photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG)
Tillie Domito, owner of Plum Precious, is pictured in her store in 2003. (File photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG)

Domito decided to make Thursday, Feb. 15, her last day in the shop at 101 Avenida Miramar.

Domito grew up in the tiny North Dakota town of Strasburg, known as the hometown of entertainer Lawrence Welk. She later lived in Oregon and the San Francisco Bay area before arriving in Orange County.

Her husband, a manufacturer’s rep, was working a trade show in Anaheim and had an appointment in San Clemente. Domito took one look at the town and said she loved all she saw, the ocean, the ambiance, friendly people.

The next day, back in Anaheim, she caught a bus to San Clemente. It dropped her off on El Camino Real. She spotted a building down Avenida Miramar, tucked away behind an office complex in an alley.

There was a telephone number. She called to ask if the building was available.

“They came and met me at the site,” she said in a 2003 interview. “I leased it on the spot.

“I’ve been here for 38 years in San Clemente with all the charming people,” she said.

She’d had a dream of opening her own antique and jewelry store. But how to become known at such an out-of-the-way location? She began doing antique and jewelry shows at clubs, civic organizations, schools and churches. She did shows for the first 15 years.

“Then I got too busy in my store,” she said. “You would be surprised, after doing antique shows around Southern California how many people became my customers and came to my store, because we are a charming city. It was wonderful to bring new people to our city.”

She told the Register in 1991 she accumulated her antique collection on buying trips to Europe and the Orient and by attending estate sales up and down the west coast.

In recent weeks, Domito has been ramping down. Having bought the Plum Precious building years ago, she now has sold it. “It’s time,” she said.

Jack and Tillie Domito of San Clemente were pictured at the Exchange Club of San Clemente's 2013 St. Patrick's Day event at the Community Center. (File photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)
Jack and Tillie Domito of San Clemente were pictured at the Exchange Club of San Clemente’s 2013 St. Patrick’s Day event at the Community Center. (File photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

Q. How will you spend your time?

A. It will be fun just to travel and enjoy life. I go for walks at the beach. I think the Fisherman’s Restaurant is paradise. Why cook when you have the ocean and the Fisherman’s?

Q. Do you ever visit your hometown in North Dakota?

A. Once every five years. I have cousins by the dozens. They come out here. I think my hometown is still about 500 people.

Q. What is the secret to success and happiness?

A. When you do people good, they’ll be back.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/14/san-clemente-antique-dealer-built-her-business-on-friendships-now-at-86-shell-retire-to-enjoy-time-with-those-friends/

Feb 14

O.C. middle school surfers put on a show at San Clemente Pier

  • Marco Forster Middle School’s Indie Hoffman races into a section Feb. 10 in a Scholastic Surf Series contest at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Marco Forster Middle School’s Indie Hoffman races into a section Feb. 10 in a Scholastic Surf Series contest at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Hudson Saunders from Thurston Middle School careens off a section at the San Clemente Pier during a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Hudson Saunders from Thurston Middle School careens off a section at the San Clemente Pier during a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A shout out from the cheering section on the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    A shout out from the cheering section on the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cascia Collings of Marco Forster Middle School carves hard in a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Cascia Collings of Marco Forster Middle School carves hard in a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Luke Wyler of Shorecliffs Middle School levitates during a Scholastic Surf Series at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Luke Wyler of Shorecliffs Middle School levitates during a Scholastic Surf Series at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The surf contest doesn’t have a tandem division but the swing set does. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The surf contest doesn’t have a tandem division but the swing set does. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Callan Emery of Marco Forster Middle School smacks the lip in a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Callan Emery of Marco Forster Middle School smacks the lip in a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Shorecliffs Middle School’s Reese Dewey shows solid form at the San Clemente Pier. She was the girls shortboard champion. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Shorecliffs Middle School’s Reese Dewey shows solid form at the San Clemente Pier. She was the girls shortboard champion. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • No need to watch a surf contest when you can mine the beach for rocks in endless shapes and sizes. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    No need to watch a surf contest when you can mine the beach for rocks in endless shapes and sizes. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Bernice Ayer Middle School’s Skyler Math slashes on her backhand in a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Bernice Ayer Middle School’s Skyler Math slashes on her backhand in a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Ben Brantell racks up points for Shorecliffs Middle Schoolp at a Scholastic Surf Series contest at the San Clemente Pier on Feb. 10. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Ben Brantell racks up points for Shorecliffs Middle Schoolp at a Scholastic Surf Series contest at the San Clemente Pier on Feb. 10. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A moment in time at a Feb. 10 Scholastic Surf Series contest at the San Clemente Pier. Everyone pictured is involved in some personal pursuit. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

    A moment in time at a Feb. 10 Scholastic Surf Series contest at the San Clemente Pier. Everyone pictured is involved in some personal pursuit. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Max Muetzel of Marco Forster Middle School powers a backside slash during a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Max Muetzel of Marco Forster Middle School powers a backside slash during a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • From left, Marco Forster’s Cascia Collings, Shorecliffs’ Reese hartnett and Shorecliffs’ Julia Guild share a fun moment while waiting for their heat to begin. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    From left, Marco Forster’s Cascia Collings, Shorecliffs’ Reese hartnett and Shorecliffs’ Julia Guild share a fun moment while waiting for their heat to begin. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Julia Guild of Shorecliffs Middle School gouges a section in the semifinals of a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Julia Guild of Shorecliffs Middle School gouges a section in the semifinals of a Scholastic Surf Series contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • An aerial minus surfboard produces a smooth landing. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    An aerial minus surfboard produces a smooth landing. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Patrick O’Connor of Marco Forster Middle School transitions from vertical into a float over a section on Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. He was the contest champion in boys shortboarding. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Patrick O’Connor of Marco Forster Middle School transitions from vertical into a float over a section on Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. He was the contest champion in boys shortboarding. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Tyrone Fomenko rebounds off a section en route to winning his heat at a Scholastic Surf Series middle school contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Tyrone Fomenko rebounds off a section en route to winning his heat at a Scholastic Surf Series middle school contest Feb. 10 at the San Clemente Pier. (Photo by Fred Swegles; Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The Pelicano Air Force does a fly-by above a San Clemente landmark, Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The Pelicano Air Force does a fly-by above a San Clemente landmark, Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Shorecliffs’ Brayden Burch makes the most of a small wave at the San Clemente Pier in the Scholastic Surf Series on Feb. 10. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Shorecliffs’ Brayden Burch makes the most of a small wave at the San Clemente Pier in the Scholastic Surf Series on Feb. 10. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Hayden Beauchemin of Shorecliffs Middle School bashes off the top at the San Clemente Pier on Feb. 10 in the Scholastic Surf Series. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Hayden Beauchemin of Shorecliffs Middle School bashes off the top at the San Clemente Pier on Feb. 10 in the Scholastic Surf Series. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Arguably the best seats in the house at surf contests at the San Clemente are the front-row seats at the Fisherman’s Restaurant. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Arguably the best seats in the house at surf contests at the San Clemente are the front-row seats at the Fisherman’s Restaurant. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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San Clemente’s Shorecliffs Middle School continues its roll through the ranks of the Scholastic Surf Series’ Orange County circuit.

In a contest held Saturday, Feb. 10, at the San Clemente Pier, the defending SSS state champions improved their season record to 4-0, racking up 275 points compared to 169 for runner-up Marco Forster Middle School of San Juan Capistrano,

It’s been that way all season, with Shorecliffs winning by big margins over Marco Forster, Bernice Ayer Middle School of San Clemente, Thurston Middle School of Laguna Beach and three other schools.

At the San Clemente Pier, division winners were Marco Forster’s Patrick O’Connor (boys shortboard), Bernice Ayer’s Nate Pierce (boys longboard), Shorecliffs’ Reese Dewey (girls shortboard), Shorecliffs’ Carolyn Sachse (girls longboard) and Niguel Hills’ Christian Boehmer (coed bodyboard).

Fourteen of the 30 division finalists were from Shorecliffs.

The fifth and final Orange County event will be March 17 at Huntington Beach Pier. Middle schoolers’ SSS State Championships are scheduled for April 28-29 at Oceanside.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/13/o-c-middle-school-surfers-put-on-a-show-at-san-clemente-pier/

Feb 13

With a full belly, San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association looks to ramp up the fun

As festive as San Juan Capistrano’s annual Taste of San Juan was, it was only a taste of things to come.

The Feb. 8 event at San Juan Hills Golf Club gave partygoers a chance to sample dishes from some 25 local restaurants and caterers.

It is one of five San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association events that will lead up to the city’s biggest event, the March 24 Swallows Day Parade and Mercado Street Faire.

  • Chef Benoit Jussaume, from O’Gourment French CafeŽ and Bakery, ignites a layer of Grand Marnier while cooking crepes in a pan during the annual Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Creek Golf Club on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Chef Benoit Jussaume, from O’Gourment French CafeŽ and Bakery, ignites a layer of Grand Marnier while cooking crepes in a pan during the annual Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Creek Golf Club on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Ricardo’s Place Restaurant Manager Juan Vilchez serves a sample of Mexican paella to Elaine DeSon of San Juan Capistrano during the Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Creek Golf Club on Thursday evening, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Ricardo’s Place Restaurant Manager Juan Vilchez serves a sample of Mexican paella to Elaine DeSon of San Juan Capistrano during the Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Creek Golf Club on Thursday evening, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Kai Vogel, a former San Juan Capistrano resident who now lives in Indiana, enjoys samples of food and drink from local restaurants along with her daughters, Ocean Vogel, center, 18 months, and Isabella Vogel, 5, while visiting her former home town at the annual Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Kai Vogel, a former San Juan Capistrano resident who now lives in Indiana, enjoys samples of food and drink from local restaurants along with her daughters, Ocean Vogel, center, 18 months, and Isabella Vogel, 5, while visiting her former home town at the annual Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Kelly Boys frontman James Kelly performs with the band at the annual Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Creek Golf Club on February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    The Kelly Boys frontman James Kelly performs with the band at the annual Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Creek Golf Club on February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Nancy Ramirez, a server for Bad to the Bone BBQ, plates pork sliders during the Taste of San Juan, featuring food samples from 21 local restaurants, at the San Juan Creek Golf Course on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Nancy Ramirez, a server for Bad to the Bone BBQ, plates pork sliders during the Taste of San Juan, featuring food samples from 21 local restaurants, at the San Juan Creek Golf Course on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Taste of San Juan attendees sample food and drink from local restaurants during the annual Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Hills Golf Club on Thursday evening, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Taste of San Juan attendees sample food and drink from local restaurants during the annual Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Hills Golf Club on Thursday evening, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Leah Connolly of San Juan Capistrano dances with her daughter, Kaylee Connolly, 3, to live music from the Kelly Boys band at the Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Leah Connolly of San Juan Capistrano dances with her daughter, Kaylee Connolly, 3, to live music from the Kelly Boys band at the Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Samples of Minnesota pork chops cooked sous-vide, served with Apple Brandy Caramel Sauce, herb potatoes and grilled veggies from the Rancho Capistrano Winery restaurant, sit on a serving tray at the annual Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Samples of Minnesota pork chops cooked sous-vide, served with Apple Brandy Caramel Sauce, herb potatoes and grilled veggies from the Rancho Capistrano Winery restaurant, sit on a serving tray at the annual Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • San Juan Capistrano residents Robin Clyde, Kim Brusseau and Laura Miller, from left, pose for a photo with the Grand Marshall of this year’s Swallows Day Parade, Steve Oedekerk, a Hollywood director and comedian and a San Juan Capistrano native, during the annual Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    San Juan Capistrano residents Robin Clyde, Kim Brusseau and Laura Miller, from left, pose for a photo with the Grand Marshall of this year’s Swallows Day Parade, Steve Oedekerk, a Hollywood director and comedian and a San Juan Capistrano native, during the annual Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Rachel Tammelin, left, serves samples of sundried tomato soup and chicken spring rolls with honey cilantro pesto sauce from the Sundried Tomato American Bistro table at the annual Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Rachel Tammelin, left, serves samples of sundried tomato soup and chicken spring rolls with honey cilantro pesto sauce from the Sundried Tomato American Bistro table at the annual Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Trevor’s at the Tracks Beverage Director Robert Hernandez, left, hands a sample of the “wok the wok” curried cioppino to Tango Wongput of San Juan Capistrano during the Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Trevor’s at the Tracks Beverage Director Robert Hernandez, left, hands a sample of the “wok the wok” curried cioppino to Tango Wongput of San Juan Capistrano during the Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Taste of San Juan attendees sample food and drink from local restaurants during the annual Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Hills Golf Club on Thursday evening, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Taste of San Juan attendees sample food and drink from local restaurants during the annual Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Hills Golf Club on Thursday evening, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Kelly Boys band performs on the patio of the San Juan Creek Golf Club during the annual Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    The Kelly Boys band performs on the patio of the San Juan Creek Golf Club during the annual Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Leah Connolly of San Juan Capistrano dances with her daughter, Kaylee Connolly, 3, to live music from the Kelly Boys band at the Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Leah Connolly of San Juan Capistrano dances with her daughter, Kaylee Connolly, 3, to live music from the Kelly Boys band at the Taste of San Juan on Thursday, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Taste of San Juan attendees sample food and drink from local restaurants during the annual Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Hills Golf Club on Thursday evening, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

    Taste of San Juan attendees sample food and drink from local restaurants during the annual Taste of San Juan at the San Juan Hills Golf Club on Thursday evening, February 8, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

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This weekend’s Pet Parade

Children ages 5 to 12 are invited to enter their pets in a parade at Los Rios Park, 31747 Los Rios St. Signups are at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 17, with the parade starting at noon. The entry fee is $5 at the park. Pets need to be on a leash or in a cage. Costumes are welcomed, for both pet and owner.

Prizes will be offered for best bird, best domestic or household pet, best costumed pet and owner, best exotic pet and best barnyard or farm animal. The judges also will pick an overall winner. That pet and its owner will be invited to appear in the Swallows Day Parade.

Much more in March

Other upcoming events include the March 17 El Presidente Ball at El Adobe Restaurant, the March 21 Fiesta Grande at the Swallows Inn, the March 23 frog-jumping contest at the Mission Grill, the March 23 Hoos’ Gow Day in the downtown district, and finally, one of America’s biggest non-motorized parades on March 24 celebrating the annual return of swallows that migrate from Argentina to Mission San Juan Capistrano.

For details about these events and signup information, see swallowsparade.com or call 949-493-1976.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/13/with-a-full-belly-san-juan-capistrano-fiesta-association-looks-to-ramp-up-the-fun/

Feb 13

San Juan Capistrano rejects request to build 47 homes on planned school site

For the second time in six months, the City Council has rejected a Capistrano Unified School District request to convert a planned school site into a residential development.

The vacant site, at Camino Las Ramblas and Avenida California, is next to the 416-home Pacifica San Juan development.

The homes still to be built in that development won’t generate enough students to warrant building a school, CUSD officials decided. The additional students can be accommodated on other campuses, they have said.

The district has an option to acquire the designated school site, zoned for institutional use, from  Pacifica San Juan developers. The proposal, officials said, is to secure approvals for constructing homes, sell the site to a developer and use the money to upgrade two campuses – Palisades Elementary and Shorecliffs Middle School – that serve children from the Pacifica San Juan area.

For the City Council, the issue is how many homes would be sought.

In September, the council denied CUSD’s request to initiate a zoning process to convert the 7.29-acre vacant lot into high-density housing, with up to 131 residential units. On council member called the proposal “insulting.”

On Feb. 6, council members nixed a downsized request for 47 homes, this time telling the school district to come back with fewer homes and a public park.

Council members didn’t specify numbers. Discussions at the meeting mentioned 40 to 42 homes and a minimum 2-acre park.

The City Council heard from residents who spoke for and against the proposal, including people who had purchased homes in Pacifica San Juan a decade ago expecting a school and a park. The council also heard from parents of school children supporting the plan.

Curt Visca, principal at Palisades Elementary, said the district performs repairs when needed, but “we need a major overhaul.” Several parents said they love Palisades although the school is more than 50 years old.

George Peterson, representing CUSD, said a 2017 assessment found that Palisades School needs more than $11 million in upgrades and Shorecliffs about $5.8 million.

The proposal for 47 homes was an outgrowth of two meetings the school district held with residents after the council’s September denial.

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/13/san-juan-capistrano-rejects-request-to-build-47-homes-on-planned-school-site/

Feb 13

New vibe on Concordia Elementary campus: ‘Dude, be nice!’

  • A student rides past a sign on the campus of Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente on Friday, February 9, 2018, as it concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” with a morning assembly honoring the school’s office manager Amy Fickling. Most every student wore their “Dude, Be Nice!” tee shirts to school and made signs honoring Fickling. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    A student rides past a sign on the campus of Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente on Friday, February 9, 2018, as it concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” with a morning assembly honoring the school’s office manager Amy Fickling. Most every student wore their “Dude, Be Nice!” tee shirts to school and made signs honoring Fickling. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cameron Dorn, a third grade student at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, holds a sign honoring Amy Fickling, office manager at the school, during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Cameron Dorn, a third grade student at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, holds a sign honoring Amy Fickling, office manager at the school, during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, makes her way through a tunnel of students and teachers as she is honored during a morning assembly which concluded a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, makes her way through a tunnel of students and teachers as she is honored during a morning assembly which concluded a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, laughs as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, laughs as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Students wear their “Dude, Be Nice!” tee shirts as they gather for a morning assembly honoring the school’s office manager Amy Fickling at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente on Friday, February 9, 2018. It concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Students wear their “Dude, Be Nice!” tee shirts as they gather for a morning assembly honoring the school’s office manager Amy Fickling at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente on Friday, February 9, 2018. It concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Signs on buildings around the campus of Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente on Friday, February 9, 2018, as it concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” with a morning assembly honoring the school’s office manager Amy Fickling. Most every student wore their “Dude, Be Nice!” tee shirts to school and made signs honoring Fickling. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Signs on buildings around the campus of Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente on Friday, February 9, 2018, as it concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” with a morning assembly honoring the school’s office manager Amy Fickling. Most every student wore their “Dude, Be Nice!” tee shirts to school and made signs honoring Fickling. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Students hold signs as Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, makes her way through a tunnel of students and teachers as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Students hold signs as Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, makes her way through a tunnel of students and teachers as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, is high-fived as she makes her way through a tunnel of students and teachers as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, is high-fived as she makes her way through a tunnel of students and teachers as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, is presented flowers by Cole Mostert, 11, the student council president, as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, is presented flowers by Cole Mostert, 11, the student council president, as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Amy Fickling, left, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, is served breakfast by Haaken Quade, 11, as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Amy Fickling, left, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, is served breakfast by Haaken Quade, 11, as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, is high-fived as she makes her way through a tunnel of students and teachers as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, is high-fived as she makes her way through a tunnel of students and teachers as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, is escorted by Cole Mostert, 11, student council president as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Amy Fickling, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, is escorted by Cole Mostert, 11, student council president as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Amy Fickling, second from right, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, leads the school in the Pledge of Allegiance as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Amy Fickling, second from right, office manager at Concordia Elementary School in San Clemente, leads the school in the Pledge of Allegiance as she is honored during a morning assembly which concludes a week-long student-driven activity called “Dude, Be Nice!” on Friday, February 9, 2018. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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Rosie Eckert, 10, can attest that it pays to think big and it pays to be nice.

Her school, Concordia Elementary in San Clemente, gets it.

The school and its 600 students united for a weeklong celebration of kindness, gratitude and inclusiveness, inspired by a Whittier apparel company called “Dude. Be Nice.”

The company’s founder, Brent Camalich, is a former San Clemente resident and friend of the Eckert family.

Rosie, a member of the student council, viewed videos of “Dude Be Nice” rallies held at schools across the country.

“It has been this dream of mine,” she said.

When she took the idea to school, the student council didn’t need much convincing. Nor the PTA or the principal.

An idea unfolds

The result was that students put together a weeklong curriculum. It included student assemblies and a day of recognition for campus supervisors who usually aren’t noticed much as they watch over students on the playground at lunch.

“We honored them with cookies and cards and a big presentation at lunch,” said Melanie Garritson, a fifth-grade teacher who is advisor to the student council.

There was Peer Appreciation Day. “We mixed up the kids so they met new people at lunch,” Garritson said. “Nobody ate alone.”

The students did a Spam and beef jerky drive, collecting some 100 cans and packets to donate to a Marine Corps battalion about to leave Camp Pendleton on deployment.

Principal Rob McKane described the Marines as “our neighbors.”

On the last day of the week, Friday, Feb. 9, the school held a rally, having picked out one staff member they agreed is “the heart and soul of Concordia.”

The students showered Amy Fickling with love, testimonials and gifts, including a pancake breakfast they prepared for her family, who made a surprise appearance.

Solidarity for a classmate

The biggest event of Dude Be Nice Week wasn’t even planned. On Friday, Feb. 2, when the week’s activities already were set, school officials were saddened to learn that Chase Walters, a 10-year-old student who has battled leukemia since kindergarten and had been in remission, would have to return to treatment.

Students and parents mobilized over the weekend. On Monday, Chase’s final day of school, the roadway onto campus was plastered solid with posters offering love and encouragement as Chase arrived, escorted by Sheriff’s deputies and the Orange County Fire Authority.

Mayor Tim Brown was there with a proclamation.

“We just put on a big rally to send Chase off to treatment with the knowledge that he is surrounded by the love and support of the community,” McKane said. “It was a wonderful show of what this community is about.”

McKane said the campus culture already reflected the values that Dude Be Nice Week teaches, so “this was really just a showcase.”

But he was impressed with how student-driven the week was. “I’ve never in my 10 years as an elementary school principal seen anything like this,” he said.

What it all means

“To me,” student council president Cole Mostert, 11, said, “it’s just an amazing way to make everybody be kind and show it, throughout our school.”

“I learned that kindness should be a big part of every person’s life,” said Daniel Beauchaine, 11. “Kindness spreads really fast. If you are kind, then everybody around you will probably be kind too.”

When the student council met to select the heart and soul of Concordia, “no other name came up except Mrs. Fickling,” said Haaken Quade, 11.

She is the office manager and, by all accounts, much, much more.

“Mrs. Fickling knows everyone’s name,” said Kylie Marcisz, 11. “It’s amazing that she knows over 600 students’ names, and many of the parents’ names too. She’s always making everyone’s day great, too. She just cares about everyone.”

The epitome of ‘nice’

Camalich, who said he started his company four years ago in Ventura to build a brand with heart, visited Concordia Elementary two weeks earlier to scout the campus. He said he was hearing positive stories about Mrs. Fickling before he could even reach her desk.

He witnessed her magic as she delicately helped a student who had been “pooped on” by a seagull. Camalich told the story at the ceremony honoring Mrs. Fickling.

“The way that you made him feel, ‘like it’s okay, there’s nothing to be embarrassed of, and it happens to everyone,’ it was truly a testament to you,” Camalich said.

Mrs. Fickling said the Friday show of adulation truly caught her by surprise, “which is shocking, because how could those kids not give it away?”

“It was awesome,” she said.

Spreading the love

Camalich said his company has produced events at about two-dozen schools across the country but hopes that more schools will do what Concordia did, “where they used our brand as a platform and a backbone and really created this ‘own’ experience themselves.”

His company will post a video of the San Clemente event at dudebenice.com.

“We film to show people how to do it,” Camalich said. “Our videos have been seen now by more than 30 million people. We highlight good, positive stories and amazing things happening in communities all over the country.”

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/13/new-vibe-on-concordia-elementary-campus-dude-be-nice/

Feb 13

Kids, show off your pet in San Juan’s pet parade Saturday

Children ages 5 to 12 are invited to enter their pets in a Kids’ Pet Parade this weekend at Los Rios Park, where one pet and owner will be invited to appear in the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s Swallows Day Parade on March 24.

Prizes will be offered Saturday for best bird, best domestic or household pet, best costumed pet and owner, best exotic pet and best barnyard or farm animal. The judges also will pick an overall winner. That pet and its owner will be invited to appear in the Swallows Day Parade.

IF YOU GO

Where: Los Rios Park, 31747 Los Rios Street, San Juan Capistrano

When: Signups are at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 17, with the parade starting at noon

Cost: The entry fee is $5 at the park

Rules: Pets need to be on a leash or in a cage. Costumes are welcomed, for both pet and owner

Details: See swallowsparade.com or call 949-493-1976

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/13/kids-show-off-your-pet-in-san-juans-pet-parade-saturday/

Feb 12

Toll road agency report criticizes San Clemente’s campaign against toll road, city fires back

This is where one of two potential routes for the 241 Toll Road through San Clemente would merge onto Interstate 5, through the Shorecliffs Golf Course corridor. Houses line the golf course on each side. (File photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)
This is where one of two potential routes for the 241 Toll Road through San Clemente would merge onto Interstate 5, through the Shorecliffs Golf Course corridor. Houses line the golf course on each side. (File photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

The chairman of the agency that governs the 241 Toll Road directed agency staff on Feb. 8 to send inside information about San Clemente’s anti-toll road campaign to the California Fair Political Practices Commission.

Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency Chairman Ed Sachs of Mission Viejo did that, after a lively discussion at a Transportation Corridor Agency board meeting in Irvine. The TCA board did not vote on it.

TCA staff and consultants presented what they called “research” about San Clemente’s 2017 hiring of a consultant to craft an anti-toll road campaign. The TCA’s own consulting firm, Venture Strategic, gathered documents from the city through a public records request.

The report to the TCA board quoted from documents in which San Clemente’s consultant outlined a plan to increase public antagonism toward the TCA, TCA board members in their own cities and some environmental groups — presumably groups that reached a 2016 lawsuit settlement with the TCA that San Clemente officials say has led to the TCA considering toll road routes through San Clemente.

Other San Clemente strategies cited included developing community opposition, suing the TCA (which the city did), engaging social media and trying to tie up the TCA and its resources in lengthy studies and challenges, the report said.

The presentation stated that an internal survey that the city commissioned, allegedly containing negative and misleading information, turned up on an anti-TCA Facebook page.

Two TCA board members questioned the city’s use of tax dollars on what board member Christina Shea of Irvine City Council called “political outreach and political maneuvers to come after other agencies.”

“It’s illegal,” Shea said.

San Clemente’s two City Council representatives serving as TCA directors disagreed.

Councilman Steven Swartz said he couldn’t understand the TCA objecting to San Clemente’s campaign when the TCA spends money on consultants and marketing to put a spin on TCA efforts and on San Clemente.

“All we are really trying to do,” Swartz said, “is protect our kids, protect our canyons, protect the land that has been set aside already (due to) development that is already there.”

Councilwoman Kathy Ward said she resented “accusations that I think you are trying to make that San Clemente is working internally with the public, that the public doesn’t have their own views and can’t figure out the same facts that we have all figured out.”

San Clemente residents at TCA meetings have repeatedly criticized the TCA’s own survey and own outreaches as misleading. During public comment Feb. 8, San Clemente resident Cord Bauer objected to TCA sponsorship of business groups that endorse TCA efforts.

San Clemente resident Michelle Schumacher presented a petition she said had more than 13,000 signatures, opposing all proposed 241 routes and calling for abolishing the agency. She objected to the TCA’s assertions about the Facebook page and said the city of San Clemente did not provide her group with an internal survey.

Board member Jose Moreno from Anaheim City Council said that while public agencies cannot try to influence an election, campaigning to educate residents about an issue of concern to them isn’t illegal. “I don’t think that what the city of San Clemente is doing is trying to influence an election,” he said.

Board member Lisa Bartlett,  an Orange County supervisor, said San Clemente has a right to educate residents but this “sounds like it is almost waging a political campaign.” She asked for legal clarification.

TCA officials said they were not making allegations, just presenting what turned up in the public records request. The goal, they said, was to let the TCA board know what tactics it is up against.

Board member Brian Maryott of the San Juan Capistrano City Council asked if TCA bylaws empower the agency to act as a board of inquiry into another body’s legislative affairs. He asked under what authority it was done.

Maryott said the TCA’s mission is transportation. “We are into a whole new realm here,” he said, “and this is what we’ve descended into.” He called it “unnecessary and disgraceful.”

After the meeting, Schumacher issued a news release announcing a south county group is collecting funds to sue the TCA over efforts to weave a toll road through existing communities.

“Residents have had enough with the TCA’s closed-door deals, lavish spending on sponsorships, lobbyists and marketing firms,” she wrote.

The Save San Onofre Coalition, which in 2016 reached a lawsuit settlement with the TCA halting TCA efforts to extend the 241 to I-5 at San Onofre, issued a response to the TCA report.

“Today’s disclosure that the San Clemente City Council unanimously approved a taxpayer-funded, negative PR campaign against the environmental organizations and thousands of residents who fought to save San Onofre State Beach is deeply disturbing,” the statement said. “Based on what we know to date, this misleading $100,000-plus PR campaign was designed to pit San Clemente neighbor against San Clemente neighbor.”

Ward, the San Clemente board member, questioned the TCA sending materials obtained from the city to the FPPC. She called the TCA’s report to the board “orchestrated” and “ridiculous.”

Sachs said several board members had voiced concerns and he would leave it to the FPPC to decide.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/12/tca-report-criticizes-san-clementes-campaign-against-toll-road/

Feb 12

Lunar New Year a colorful spectacle at the Outlets at San Clemente

  • A 30-foot-long ‘dragon dance’ gyrated through the crowd at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    A 30-foot-long ‘dragon dance’ gyrated through the crowd at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Spectators at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente take a selfie as a lion approaches behind them. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Spectators at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente take a selfie as a lion approaches behind them. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Graceful movements characterized dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School performing Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Graceful movements characterized dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School performing Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Performers from Three Treasures Cultural Arts Society in San Diego show their quickness and dexterity at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Performers from Three Treasures Cultural Arts Society in San Diego show their quickness and dexterity at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The audience reacts as Hank Huang performs yo-yo acrobatics at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The audience reacts as Hank Huang performs yo-yo acrobatics at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Face-painting was among the attractions at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Face-painting was among the attractions at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year drew a robust audience at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    A Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year drew a robust audience at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Check the facial reactions of children as dancing lions approach the crowd at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Check the facial reactions of children as dancing lions approach the crowd at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Children had all the front-row seats as dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School performed Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Children had all the front-row seats as dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School performed Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Rene Wang captivates an audience with his yo-yo magic at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Rene Wang captivates an audience with his yo-yo magic at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A crowd gathered at the Outlets at San Clemente to watch costumed dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School on Saturday, Feb. 10, for a Lunar New Year celebration. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    A crowd gathered at the Outlets at San Clemente to watch costumed dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School on Saturday, Feb. 10, for a Lunar New Year celebration. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Martial arts performers from Three Treasures Cultural Arts Society in San Diego put on a show at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Martial arts performers from Three Treasures Cultural Arts Society in San Diego put on a show at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School perform for the fans with fans on Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School perform for the fans with fans on Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Members of the audience interact as dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School sway on Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Members of the audience interact as dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School sway on Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • “Nice lion!” members of the audience seem to be saying as colorfully costumed lion performers fan out into the crowd at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    “Nice lion!” members of the audience seem to be saying as colorfully costumed lion performers fan out into the crowd at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Colorful costumes and face masks decorated dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School performing Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Colorful costumes and face masks decorated dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School performing Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Rene Wang captivates an audience with his yo-yo magic at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Rene Wang captivates an audience with his yo-yo magic at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Clasping hands, these dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School performed Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Clasping hands, these dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School performed Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The audience is mesmerized by gyrating Chinese lions performing at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The audience is mesmerized by gyrating Chinese lions performing at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Performers from Three Treasures Cultural Arts Society in San Diego simulated a lion “feeding” other lions, mouths wide open to accept the offering tossed into the air, at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Performers from Three Treasures Cultural Arts Society in San Diego simulated a lion “feeding” other lions, mouths wide open to accept the offering tossed into the air, at a Feb. 10 celebration of Lunar New Year at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School put on a show Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Dancers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center and Irvine Chinese School put on a show Saturday, Feb. 10, at a Lunar New Year celebration at the Outlets at San Clemente. (Photo by Fred Swegles, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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In Asian cultures, Lunar New Year begins on different dates from year to year. This year, known as Year of the Dog, begins on Feb. 16.

The Outlets at San Clemente provided a preview by hosting colorful Feb. 10 festivities, free to the public

The highlight was a 90-minute show presented by some 50 performers from the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center/Irvine Chinese School and Three Treasures Cultural Arts Society from San Diego.

What is known as Chinese New Year in the world’s most populous nation, China, is commonly celebrated in Southern California as Lunar New Year, since multiple Asian communities observe it. To learn more about traditions, see chinesenewyear2018.com, which proclaims that this is a cherished holiday for more than 20 percent of the world’s population.

 

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/12/lunar-new-year-a-colorful-spectacle-at-the-outlets-at-san-clemente/

Feb 09

30-foot dragon dance to highlight outlets’ Lunar New Year festivities

The Irvine Chinese School and the Three Treasures Cultural Arts Society from San Diego will entertain 1 to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 10, as the Outlets at San Clemente celebrate the Lunar New Year.

The show will include a 30-foot dragon dance, interactive lion dances for children, martial arts demonstrations, arts and crafts, face painting and more, the outlets announced in a news release. The outlet center is at 101 W. Avenida Vista Hermosa, San Clemente.

For more, see shoposc.com, under “events.”

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/09/30-foot-dragon-dance-to-highlight-outlets-lunar-new-year-festivities/