Andrea Mills

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OUSD briefs: Villa Park High seniors leave with new skills

The students were at school early, before the first bell, setting up project boards, archery targets, cars, music stands and computers, the plaintive sounds of bagpipes echoing across the campus, as they anxiously awaited the judges.

As a last educational experience before graduation into the “real world,” all Villa Park High School seniors must complete a senior project, an important part of their English class grade. Each student is encouraged to choose an individual project they find interesting and challenging, and requires them to go out of their comfort zone to learn or develop a new skill.

  • Brett Rabun shows the realistic hand he made, for his senior project on prop making. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Kaitlyn Magante chose hula dancing for her senior project; Vihangi De Silva chose the cultural dances of Sri Lanka for her project. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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  • Luke Bauman and his slack lining project. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Elizabeth Riley created the video game, Kishikaisel, for her senior project at Villa Park High. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Richard Fuentes learned the accordion and Colin McCray the bagpipes for their senior project at Villa Park High. (Couresty of Andrea Mills)

  • Cade Johnson learned tongue-and-groove techniques from his father in order to build this birdhouse. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Austin Thomas, far right, explains his engine rebuild project to a judge while completing the process for his senior project at Villa Park High. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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The student must find a mentor or instructor to help, and, most importantly, must persevere through setbacks and difficulties to acquire the skill and complete the project. For the final grade, every student creates a project board to show their progression throughout the learning process, including mistakes and obstacles, and then demonstrates the newly-acquired skill and/or exhibits the finished project before a team of judges.

A number of students challenged themselves physically, learning yoga, kickboxing, boxing and surfing. Puja Jain took classes to conquer the new and challenging art form of aerial silks; Luke Bauman endeavored to learn slack lining, which involves balancing and walking on a tightrope. Figure skating was the project chosen by Dulcee Torres. Cole Sexton began bicycle racing; other students undertook archery, golf, fishing, and obtained scuba certification. A few students, already proficient in a sport, shared their expertise by coaching and helping train others.

Some seniors delved into cooking, either preparing a special family dish, learning a new cuisine, or acquiring rudimentary skills. Emma Gomez learned to make her grandmother’s tamales; creating Peruvian food was Jeanine Blanchard’s goal. James Bellor learned to cook Southern dishes, while Megan Buelna prepared her family’s favorite Italian recipes. Isabella Gallegos combined herb gardening and cooking. Others learned to prepare a breakfast, ethnic foods, or bake and decorate cakes.

The challenges were as diverse as the individuals. Students tested their creativity, learning crafts such as crocheting, ceramics, sculpting, photography and sewing. Esmerelda Aguilar chose to learn knitting. Lauryn Carter studied calligraphy, while Brett Rabun created highly realistic movie props. Haysam Gavino studied magic and Zoe Nye investigated woodburning. Kyle Tipple experimented with street art, while Tanner Gould’s interest was graphic design. One student wrote a memoir, another created a story board.

There were students who created computer programs or designed video games, and others who built computers. While creating a video game, Kishikaisel, Elizabeth Riley learned Japanese. Other students were determined to learn American Sign Language as their project.

Many students explored music, including Kristine Cornejo, who learned to play the ukulele. Others learned to play the guitar or piano, studied voice, started a band, studied sound mixing, or learned about music production. The accordion was the instrument of choice for Richard Fuentes, while Colin McCray chose the bagpipes. Jenna Urquidez studied choreography, to create a dance for two students; Kaitlyn Magante became proficient at hula dancing, and Vihangi De Silva learned the complex dances of Sri Lanka. Caitlin Jelensky learned to tap dance, a fellow student learned clogging.

While some seniors tested out future hobbies, others sampled future careers.

Bradley Gilkerson studied stock market investing, and Michael Pickering learned house painting. Rachel Yates exhibited the techniques for applying special effects makeup she had practiced, and Maria Sosa studied cosmetology.

Hope Lopez’s senior project involved an internship at a local business; Emilie Donaldson volunteered at a veterinarian office, and Andrew Carrera job shadowed at an elementary school. Mike Miller explored solar power. Raegan Peterson trained her dog.

One ambitious student wrote a business plan for a future endeavor, another designed clothing for a possible business. An entrepreneurial student created and designed a product, and another student began selling on Amazon. Ross Brent and Jesus Viveros built mini-bikes, which they may consider selling. Austin Thomas worked to rebuild and install the engine of a race car, and others learned about vehicle maintenance, motorcycle repair and welding.

A number of students learned wood-working skills. Hannah Gagow created a striking, large vanity with mirrors and lights. Cade Johnson spent more than six weeks designing and hand-crafting a unique bi-level combination bird feeder and bird house, using tongue-and-groove techniques gleaned from his father. Justin Hailey constructed a wooden table with an inlaid mosaic surface on top.

Though the projects were widely diverse, the one constant throughout the campus was the pride of accomplishment.

The students were justifiably proud of not only setting, but also conquering a challenge, acquiring a new skill, and completing a project. They learned self-reliance, planning and organization, and exhibited a commitment of time and tenacity.

Some found a life-long interest, others developed a useful skill set.

The seniors had, perhaps, discovered a confidence in their own ability to make decisions, learn and grow, just in time to graduate into college and careers.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/07/19/ousd-briefs-villa-park-high-seniors-leave-with-new-skills/

OUSD briefs: Interact and Chemical Society clubs honor seniors at Villa Park High

The Villa Park High School 12th annual Rotary Interact and sixth annual American Chemical Society Recognition and Installation were recently held in a combined ceremony.

VPHS chemistry teacher Linda Bartrom is an advisor to both the Interact Club and the American Chemical Society Club on campus.

International Interact graduation stoles were presented to seniors Kaitlyn Nguyen, Theresa Pham, Michael Shcharber, Sydney To, Ben Versteeg, Delaney Walsh and An Vu, and Interact Presidential Scholarships were awarded to An Vu and Kaitlyn Nguyen.

  • Members of the Rotary Interact and American Chemical Society clubs at Villa Park High were recently honored with various recognitions. (Courtesy of Villa Park High)

  • Crescent Elementary School fourth-graders Gavin Shea, left, and Blake Hartfelder hleped collect and delivered 700 blankets and towels to Orange County Animal Care, for the shelter animals. (Courtesy of Eileen Hartfelder)

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  • Alexander Murphy, Boy Scout Troop 33, earned the Eagle Scout rank, the highest honor in scouting. (Courtesy of the Murphy Family)

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The 2017-18 Interact board was recognized with certificates: An Vu and Kaitlyn Nguyen, co-presidents; Paula Gibb and Miranda Gabrin, vice presidents; Saicharitha Kalvakota and Elianna Peng, secretaries; Theresa Pham, treasurer; James Gagliardi and Delaney Walsh, Rotary liaisons; Christian Yun, Ryan Vu, underclassmen representatives; Ben Versteeg, communication; Dina Mirbabaei, publicity; Sydney To, historian; Christian Uriostegui, Link Crew correspondent;  and Michael Shcharber, ASB correspondent.

The 2018-19 board was installed and pinned: Paula Gibb and Miranda Gabrin, co-presidents; Christian Yun, vice president; Saicharita Kalvakota, treasurer; Ryan Vu, secretary; Lindsey To, publicity; Katrina Sommer, historian; Amy Gitmed and Candice Tang, Rotary liaisons; Emma Deters, NHS advisor; and Robert Bilodeau, underclassmen representative.

American Chemical Society graduation honor cords and ACS pins were presented to seniors Dilini Amarasinghe, Christina Chao, Oliver La Capria, Jandy Le, Haylie Munda, Sydney Strupp and Sydney To. ACS scholarships were awarded to Sydney Strupp and Sydney To.

Certificates of recognition were presented to the 2017-18 ACS Board: Sydney Strupp, president; Sydney To, vice president; Dilini Amarasinghe, treasurer; Christina Chao and Haylie Munda, secretaries; Jandy Le and Ashley Nguyen, recruitment; Oliver La Capria, historian; Alexandra Lai and Dean Kuli, publicity.

The 2018-19 board was installed and pinned: Alexandra Lai and Dean Kuli will be co-presidents; Ashley Nguyen, vice president; Candice Tang and Davin Ancich, publicity; Emilie Nguyen and Blaise Slattery, historians; Ryan Vu and Lindsey To, secretaries; Nathan Pham and Robert Bilodeau, recruitment.

Blanket drive

Prior to summer vacation, the Crescent Elementary School Student Council held a blanket and towel drive, collecting the goods for the new Orange County Animal Care shelter.

The students collected more than 700 blankets and towels for use in the animal cages, and as a soft place for new litters of puppies and kittens.

Eagle Scout builds project for OCSA

Alexander “Alex” Murphy earned the rank Eagle Scout, the highest honor achievable in Boy Scouting. He received the promotion at a formal Eagle Court of Honor ceremony.

Alex began as a Tiger Cub in Pack 51 at St. John’s Lutheran School 11 years ago, earning the Arrow of Light before bridging to Boy Scouts.

As a member of Boy Scout Troop 33, he participated in numerous outdoor activities including camping, hiking, backpacking, canoeing, and kayaking. He attended two National Scout Jamborees and a World Scout Jamboree in Japan. He was crew leader for an 85-mile backpacking trek at Philmont Scout Ranch.

With more than 125 nights of camping, he earned a National Outdoor Award for Camping. He was involved with the National Youth Leadership Training program first as a participant, then as staff for three summers. This year, he will serve as an assistant senior patrol leader, as part of the executive staff. He will also work at the 2019 World Scout Jamboree, hosted by North America, as support staff for the medical team.

For his Eagle project, Alex, a student at the Orange County School of the Arts, designed and led the construction of two cedar compost boxes. The Culinary Arts and Hospitality Conservatory will use the boxes to compost food scraps, and the Ecology Club will use the compost in the school’s sustainable garden.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/07/12/ousd-briefs-interact-and-chemical-society-clubs-honor-seniors-at-villa-park-high/

Villa Park Elementary students get in sync for year-ending show

What began, many years ago, as a lunchtime activity to keep students engaged during “spring fever” has become a long-standing and much-anticipated tradition for the end of the school year at Villa Park Elementary.

Groups of students work together to select a song, create props and cute costumes appropriate to the song and prepare dance moves and choreography. They then “lip sync” the song before their peers.

Parents are called on to help create the costumes and coordinate after-school practices, then act as “roadies,” moving props on and off-stage.

  • This crew of Villa Park Elementary students, including, in back, Chase Olsen, Jude Califf, Tanner Dickey, Ryan Riley and, in front, Oak Griswold, Trevor Kendall, and Nicholas Kendall channeled the ’70s with “Party Rock.” (Courtesy of Amber Olsen)

  • Ava Espinoza was promoted from La Veta Elementary. (Courtesy of the Espinoza Family)

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  • These cute Villa Park Elementary first graders, Kendall Cahill, Veyda Palumbo, Kylie Wong, Kailea Andrade, Aysha Patel, and Winter Finamore, believe it’s “Better Together.” (Courtesy of Kim Finamore)

  • These fourth-grade students, Cambria Mistofsky, Jordan Andrade, Brooke Minor, Violet Bengry, Chloe Tejeda and Megan Gilhausan, performed “Wildside” in the annual VPE lip sync. (Courtesy of Kim Finamore)

  • Handy Elementary School promoted students, middle row, from left: Anderson Rodriguez, Analeah Rodriguez, Darrin Rhodes, Pasepa Ofa; and front, Heber Flores Xitlama, Alexander De Rosas and Chelsea Corona. (Courtesy of Suzan Glad)

  • Handy Elementary School kindergarten promotion, with Char Housky and Principal Michelle Owen, rear; students Leah Lopez-Cruz, Fernanda Hernandez, Pasepa Ofa, Adan Slameron and Benjamin Mojica. (Courtesy of Suzan Glad)

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The audiences are always enthusiastic and very supportive. This time, when the speaker unexpectedly cut out during a performance, the audience jumped in to sing – much to the delight of the performers.

This year, 24 ensembles took to the stage, representing a number of musical eras and genres, including a Michael Jackson “Beat It/Thriller” medley, “Girls Just Want to Have Fun,” and the ever-popular “We Are Family,” performed by a troupe of 11.

Second graders danced with colorful ribbons to “Yum Yum Breakfast Burrito,” and third graders clad in sunny yellow tops, pastel-striped skirts and sunglasses charmed with “Walking on Sunshine.”

Fourth-grade girls, in vibrant tie-dyed ensembles and backdrops declared “There’s Nothing Holding Me Back.” The “Wildside” fourth-grade sextet was garbed in overalls and flannel shirts, while the all-male “Heros” group, in army-green camo, was “Unstoppable.”

A mummy joined two white-clad Cleopatras to “Walk Like an Egyptian;” the group syncing to “Fired Up” went patriotic; the group dubbed “Future Leaders” lip synced to “Me Too.” A large black-clad crew surprised the audience when they removed their shirts to reveal yellow and zig-zag Charlie Brown T-shirts and Snoopy, and performed to“Better When I’m Dancing.”

For their final lip sync performance at VPE, a group of sixth graders channeled the ’50s, the girls in white bobby sox and colorful gingham full–skirted dresses, the boys in white T’s and cuffed jeans. They began performing in front of their kindergarten portraits, later turning them over to reveal current photos, and symbolically ran through a banner on their way to middle school, lip syncing to “We Go Together.”

Sixth-grade girls in camo attire shared that they will enter middle school as “Confident” women. And still another sixth-grader group sported middle school uniforms when they “Stole the Show” and said “Hello-Goodbye” to elementary school.

Moving up

While the big kids in the Class of 2018 participated in graduation ceremonies at Fred Kelly Stadium, middle schools and elementary schools held promotion exercises.

For the students and families, it was a milestone to be celebrated. A few shared their memories with us.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/07/03/villa-park-elementary-students-get-in-sync-for-year-ending-show/

Portola Middle School unveils newest mural and new garden by students

Portola Middle School embraced all things French this school year.

At the suggestion of art teacher Rick Blake, the career education Fashion Design and Merchandising classes created French-inspired fashions for its “Les Jardins de France Spring Fashion Show,” and the Portola Arts Program recently held a formal ribbon-cutting for the mural “French Artists – Water Lilies” and opened the gates to the new California History Garden and Art Project.

  • Portola Middle School art teacher Rick Blake, third from left, and students, prepares to cut formally cut the ribbon, unveiling the 10th mural, entitled French Artists – Water Lilies. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Portola Middle School art teacher Rick Blake, third from left, and students, prepares to cut formally cut the ribbon, unveiling the 10th mural, entitled French Artists – Water Lilies. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Student Diego Pardo help research and paint the French artist Claude Monet, shown with his quote, as part of the mural students painted this year at Portola Middle School. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Student Diego Pardo help research and paint the French artist Claude Monet, shown with his quote, as part of the mural students painted this year at Portola Middle School. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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  • Joey Jennings stands by the redwood pergola built by Rick Blake and his students in the  California History Garden and Art Project at Portolla Middle Schools. (Courtesy Andrea Mills)

    Joey Jennings stands by the redwood pergola built by Rick Blake and his students in the California History Garden and Art Project at Portolla Middle Schools. (Courtesy Andrea Mills)

  • Johnny Johnson, center, stands with the champions of the 24 annual Jeri Knox-Fred Barrera Handball Tournament. The students, all from El Modena, won both the doubles and singles: from left, Saul Mellado and Gustavo Ayala won the doubles championship over Andrew Garnica and Eriberto Espinoza. Espinoza won the singles championship, besting Gustavo Ayala in the finals. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Johnny Johnson, center, stands with the champions of the 24 annual Jeri Knox-Fred Barrera Handball Tournament. The students, all from El Modena, won both the doubles and singles: from left, Saul Mellado and Gustavo Ayala won the doubles championship over Andrew Garnica and Eriberto Espinoza. Espinoza won the singles championship, besting Gustavo Ayala in the finals. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Johnny Johnson, front right, with a number of the players from the 24th annual Knox-Berrera Hnadmall Tournament. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Johnny Johnson, front right, with a number of the players from the 24th annual Knox-Berrera Hnadmall Tournament. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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Blake continues to inspire and share his love of art with his students and the school, year after year. His unflagging enthusiasm and conceptual design helps individual students collaborate and create a lasting statement at the school. This year, his talents resulted in, not only the 10th annual student-created mural to grace the school site, but also a beautiful garden and pergola.

During the year, Blake’s students studied the works of French painters, including Edgar Degas, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Berthe Morisot, Francois Boucher, and Claude Monet. It was the latter’s work that inspired the large, four-panel mural of water lilies in the early morning light, throughout the day, and at sunset.

About 30 students contributed to the mural, researching, sketching and painting during class, but also during their lunch hour and after school. Meaningful quotes, with portraits of the famed artists, highlight the perimeter of the mural.

In addition to the mural, Blake and a number of students designed and planted the California History Garden and Art Project, situated in close proximity to an earlier mural, reflecting the history of California and the school’s namesake, Gaspar de Portola. A winding trail meanders through the garden, filled with native California plants, each with an identifying label and accentuated by artistic surprises, such as a carefully-placed skull or cat statue.

The peaceful garden also boasts a newly-constructed redwood pergola, large enough to include two picnic tables, built by Blake and his students. A grant from Lowe’s aided in the purchase of the materials for the construction and plantings.

Annual handball tourney

Handball may not get as much fanfare as other sports, but its players are equally passionate about the sport. Players from El Modena High, Orange High, Richland High and Villa Park High recently convened at the VPHS courts for the 24nd annual Jeri Knox-Fred Barrera Handball Tournament.

The players competed in the singles and doubles single-elimination tournaments.

Barrera, a former Orange councilman and a fan of the sport, helped initiate a pilot program in 1993. Knox, of Knox Insurance in Orange, supported handball for more than 20 years, bequeathing funds in her will. Orange Rotary was a sponsor this year.

But the tournament would not happen without Johnny Johnson. A retired teacher and coach, Johnson coordinates the tournament, often dipping into his own pocket to supplement when needed. He mentors the players, advocates for the sport, and coordinates school tournaments. He also travels to middle schools to introduce the fast-paced game, teaching the sport at both Portola and Cerro Villa middle schools this year.

Devotees, such as Johnson, like the fast pace of handball, the need for only two to play and minimal equipment, which makes it readily accessible for students. Speed, strategy and hand-eye coordination help win the game. Referees are not needed, as players work out questionable calls diplomatically.

This year, two-year champion Mike Salgado from Orange, and three-year champion Jose Cruz from El Modena found themselves out of the finals. El Modena players eliminated all contenders in both A and B brackets, to battle it out for both the singles and doubles titles.

Gustavo Ayala, a junior, fought against junior Eriberto Espinoza for the championship, with Eriberto claiming the title. The two singles champions then braved the heat with their respective partners – Ayala with Saul Mellado, Espinoza with Andrew Garnica – to compete for the doubles championship. Ayala and Mellado claimed the 2018 doubles championship title.

The El Modena champs will defend their titles at the 25th tournament in 2019. The indefatigable Johnson is already planning ahead to a milestone event that will be held at Orange High School. Sponsors are welcome to contact Johnson at any time.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/06/12/portola-middle-school-unveils-newest-mural-and-new-garden-by-students/

Villa Park Elementary bell rings again

The countdown is on!

Students are ending the school year with band and choir concerts, awards ceremonies, dances, field trips to Disneyland or Magic Mountain, field games and fun. Elementary and middle schools have slated their promotions, and the Class of 2018 from Canyon, Orange, Richland and Villa Park High will receive their diplomas in seven days, and head out to their future.

Villa Park Elementary bell dedication

Prior to the annual Open House, the community and alumnus were welcomed on to the Villa Park Elementary school campus for a ceremony to dedicate the historic bell that once rang from the school’s former bell tower.

The bell, weighing more than 500 pounds, once rang each weekday, summoning local children to Mountain View School. The school’s name was later changed to Villa Park Elementary, and it became a part of the Orange Unified School District.

  • Former principal Ed Berriman, once a student at Villa Park Elementary, assisted by Dad’s Club President Mark Kuli, two kindergarten students, and current Principal Raeanne Little, rings the restored bell for the first time. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Former principal Ed Berriman, once a student at Villa Park Elementary, assisted by Dad’s Club President Mark Kuli, two kindergarten students, and current Principal Raeanne Little, rings the restored bell for the first time. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • The historic bell, salvaged when the old schoolhouse at Villa Park Elementary was demolished, has been restored and placed on a monument in the campus quad area. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    The historic bell, salvaged when the old schoolhouse at Villa Park Elementary was demolished, has been restored and placed on a monument in the campus quad area. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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  • Former Villa Park Elementary principals, staff and OUSD officials gathered for the dedication ceremony for the historic schoolhouse bell. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Former Villa Park Elementary principals, staff and OUSD officials gathered for the dedication ceremony for the historic schoolhouse bell. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Teachers, some of whom have been with the school since its inception, and Principal Joe Erven posed for a McPherson Magnet School 20th Anniversary Celebration photo. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Teachers, some of whom have been with the school since its inception, and Principal Joe Erven posed for a McPherson Magnet School 20th Anniversary Celebration photo. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Orange High 2018 Prom King Alexis Udave and Queen Mallory Renteria in front are flanked by princesses, from left, Hannia Cruz, Wendy Guzman, Katie Le and Ana Sanchez; and princes Anthony Uribe, Syrus Collins, Jordan Schmidt and Arian Solis. (Courtesy of Orange High)

    Orange High 2018 Prom King Alexis Udave and Queen Mallory Renteria in front are flanked by princesses, from left, Hannia Cruz, Wendy Guzman, Katie Le and Ana Sanchez; and princes Anthony Uribe, Syrus Collins, Jordan Schmidt and Arian Solis. (Courtesy of Orange High)

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The bell was silenced for a number of years, as attempts to renovate and restore the historic Spanish Revival school buildings in the center of the VPE campus were unsuccessful. During the summer break in 2017 the two buildings, deemed unsafe, were demolished and replaced by a grass quad area with curved walkways.

Thanks to OUSD, the rusted bell was salvaged and restored, and set upon a monument within the quad area.

Former student (1936-44), bus driver, custodian and principal (1980-83) Ed Berriman was the first to ring the bell, as six former principals, Dave Baker, Skip Roland, Joe Fortier, Anne Schrader, Larry Hausner and Debbie Larson, and 35-year office manager Kathi Curtis, current Principal Raeanne Little and Dad’s Club President Mark Kuli looked on.

McPherson Anniversary

McPherson Magnet School celebrated its 20th anniversary of education with a ceremony and an open house, reflecting all of the advancements in the last two decades.

Zachary Cleberg, president of the McPherson Education Foundation, spoke briefly to the audience of alumni, families and supporters, enthusiastically lauding the school for the educational experience, noting that he was in the first class to graduate from McPherson, and now has a first grader and a kindergarten student to follow in his footsteps.

Cindy Lundby, one of the original teachers to open McPherson, recalled when the magnet school first opened, without textbooks and playgrounds. Yet, parents were lined up outside  for the lottery that was originally held on campus – amidst much rejoicing and some crying. The school was the first to have a magnet focus of math and science, before S.T.E.M. became an emphasis.

Other speakers mentioned the popular GiGi math program, unique to McPherson, the first school dance, sleeping on sidewalks to get into the lottery, and, most of all, the “family feel” that has made McPherson alumnus and families feel so connected and supportive, even two decades later.

McPherson continues to advance and engage students with Project Lead The Way, providing unique experiences in engineering, biomedical, and computer areas.

It is one of 40 schools with a Femineer Program, created by Cal Poly Pomona’s College of Engineering, to inspire and empower females to pursue STEM majors and careers. McPherson Femineers learn in a three-year program which includes topics such as creative robotics, wearable technology and Pi robotics. They met weekly after school, under the tutelage of Teresa Andrade and Sara Hoffmann, to learn about electronics, wiring, sensor, motors, microcontrollers and programing, using hands-on activities, preparatory to displaying their projects at the annual Femineers Summit at Cal Poly Pomona.

Get ready for summer

Flexible Scholar-AthElite Summer Camps for students ages 4 through 13, taught by trained coaches and teachers, will be offered at the Cerro Villa Middle School campus between June 18 and Aug. 3. Specialized camps for S.T.E.M., photography, stop motion animation, drama, forensics, football, basketball, baseball and more will be offered. Parents may opt to register students for daily or weekly classes, extended daycare, and half or full days. See ScholarAthElite.com for more information, or call 714-310-3100.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/06/07/villa-park-elementary-bell-rings-again/

Fashion Week at Orange Unified campuses

It was standing-room only for the “Les Jardins de France Spring Fashion Show,” presented by the Portola Middle School fashion design classes.

The show could have rivaled any New York fashion event. The Portola team, who are students in the fashion design and merchandising career training program, created colorful invitations, featuring an illustration by Shayla Dinh, with coordinating tickets, programs and swag bags for guests. Two video screens reflecting floral scenes from Paris flanked the flower-bedecked runway.

The event began with student models showcasing paper dresses and ornate masks. These beautiful, delicate and creative confections all elevated paper art to its highest form.

  • Wendy Madrigal models the stunning floral wedding gown designed by Leslile Patrino, center, and Claudia Dubon Hernandez, right. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Wendy Madrigal models the stunning floral wedding gown designed by Leslile Patrino, center, and Claudia Dubon Hernandez, right. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Claudia Dubon Hernandez, Outstanding Achievement Award winner; teacher Deanne Weiser, center; and Future Fashion Designer Awardee Leslie Patino. (Courtesy of Faye Chapman)

    Claudia Dubon Hernandez, Outstanding Achievement Award winner; teacher Deanne Weiser, center; and Future Fashion Designer Awardee Leslie Patino. (Courtesy of Faye Chapman)

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  • The Shades of Fall dress, on the runway,  is constructed entirely of paper. It is modeled by Stefania Madrigal, and was designed by Katie Sanchez and Tina Nguyen. (Courtesy of  Faye Chapman)

    The Shades of Fall dress, on the runway, is constructed entirely of paper. It is modeled by Stefania Madrigal, and was designed by Katie Sanchez and Tina Nguyen. (Courtesy of Faye Chapman)

  • Fashions from the “A Night in Paris” grouping walk the runway. (Courtesy of Faye Chapman)

    Fashions from the “A Night in Paris” grouping walk the runway. (Courtesy of Faye Chapman)

  • Angelina Salinas models this peach confection she designed with Shayla Dinh. (Courtesy of  Faye Chapman)

    Angelina Salinas models this peach confection she designed with Shayla Dinh. (Courtesy of Faye Chapman)

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A video segment highlighted the work of the first-year students, showing them researching, creating idea books, sketching, and learning to sew pillowcases. Then, those students modeled their incredible T-shirt transformations. The simple shirts were totally transformed into unique and highly individual statements: they were embellished with embroidery, lace and jewels; shortened, painted, fringed, beaded, belted and so much more.

The second-year students were then highlighted in a video montage, emphasizing the six to nine months they worked during class, before school, at lunchtime and after school to research, experiment, sketch and sew 36 striking ensembles. The students had visited the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising and looked to Chanel, Degas, Matisse, Dior, Vionnet and French royalty for inspiration and teams collaborated to create ensembles for their models.

Ensembles in “A Walk in the Park” featured a boxy black and white herringbone jacket, saucy berets, Matisse-like flower graphics painted on a black skirt,  and a Matisse-inspired blue painted top with coordinating black jeans splashed with yellow.

The “A Night in Paris” ensembles included a superb selection of evening wear, all accentuated with matching headpieces. A simply-cut, but stunning, black dress with florals; a black velvet dress with deep red rose sleeves; and a burgundy tulle dress, accentuated with gold trim, were among the designs.

The final grouping, “The Royal Flowers” was spectacular. The gowns were all gorgeous, but the final one was the pièce de résistance. The “Dream Team,” comprised of designers Claudia Dubon Hernandez and Leslie Patrino, created a breath-taking wedding gown. The white strapless, fitted gown was bedecked with exquisite fabric flowers in a variety of sherbet colors, grouped on the bodice, in the full headdress, and strategically scattered on the skirt and down the long train. Model Wendy Madrigal was poised as she wore the work of art on the runway to thunderous applause.

Fittingly, teacher Deanne Weiser bestowed the Outstanding Achievement Award to Claudia Dubon Hernandez, and the Future Fashion Designer Award to Leslie Patrino, the creators of the bridal gown.

Cerro Villa fashion show

The Cerro Villa Middle School “A Stitch Through Time” fashion showcase, coordinated by CTE Fashion Design and Merchandising teacher Roni Hanke, was a fun romp through United States – and fashion – history.

Guests found student vendors offering food, drinks and ducktape wallets outside the entrance, fundraising for school clubs. Inside, guests had an opportunity to meet with fashion students and hear about their months of research and learning that culminated in the event’s fashion showcase that would include 16 runway looks and six dance routines, with numerous set changes, props and choreography.

The colorful programs, highlighting historical happenings, were designed by students. The ensembles, with unique hair and make-up, were student-curated. In a fun twist, the models were all teachers.

The CV Vikings cheer squad, now in its third year, warmed up the crowd with a high-energy performance. The emcee kept the pace lively, beginning with the Victorian era: top hat and tails for the gentleman, and a stunning black and white floor-length gown, with a lovely white-draped neckline accentuated by a red rose and a small, charming hat. The styles then jumped a century to the 1980s with a cropped top, neon leggings with socks and bright shoes, accompanied by tutus and denim.

Ricocheting back to the 1920s, the Age of Women featured the famous flapper styles. Bouncing to the 60s, against a colorful paint-splattered backdrop, teachers wore go-go boots, and colorful mod styles to do “the swim”. A backdrop scribbled with “totally” was the perfect setting for the Grunge and an early-Madonna look of the 1990s. The showcase also featured, in its time capsule view, a look into a 2030 “Future Odyssey” with teachers in sleek geometric black and royal blue futuristic apparel.

The high-energy finale featured a 1950s vibe, beginning with students and teachers in colorful circle skirts in a boogie routine, interrupted with the Greasers strolling in to take over. A fun dance scene ensued.

The enthusiastic audience loved seeing the styles, and the students loved that their favorite teachers stepped out of their norms to work with the student designers to hone and bring to life their fashion concepts.

Sadly, there will be no more brilliant fashion shows, as the CTE Fashion and Merchandising programs at the middle school level have been cut, per the school district.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/24/fashion-week-at-orange-unified-campuses/

Orange High FFA students show off their farm and livestock

Orange High School’s Future Farmers of America students hosted their annual Farm Fest, opening the gates to Panther Farm for visitors young and old.

Guests had an opportunity to view the livestock raised by the students, watch sheep shearing, enjoy lunch and interact with the petting zoo animals.

The knowledgeable FFA students hosted games, provided butter-making demonstrations, sold plants they had raised and shared information about the very popular petting zoo animals. The petting zoo is maintained by the students and travels to venues for school carnivals and events.

  • Abbygail Rodriguez, 6, offers food to the petting zoo goat at the Orange High School FFA Farm Fest. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Abbygail Rodriguez, 6, offers food to the petting zoo goat at the Orange High School FFA Farm Fest. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Abraham Lazaro, a sophomore in the Orange High agriculture program, holds a chicken for visitors to pet. OHS students sell fresh eggs from the chickens. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Abraham Lazaro, a sophomore in the Orange High agriculture program, holds a chicken for visitors to pet. OHS students sell fresh eggs from the chickens. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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  • Visitor Gianna Garcia, 4, was mesmerized by the blue eyes of Bruce, the alpaca. Bruce, approximately 8 years old, was rescued from an abusive situation and thrives as a member of the OHS Panther Farm Petting Zoo. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Visitor Gianna Garcia, 4, was mesmerized by the blue eyes of Bruce, the alpaca. Bruce, approximately 8 years old, was rescued from an abusive situation and thrives as a member of the OHS Panther Farm Petting Zoo. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Cole Cooper, 4, son of OHS World History teacher Matt Cooper, shows his empty hands to donkey Cadbury and goat Ebony. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Cole Cooper, 4, son of OHS World History teacher Matt Cooper, shows his empty hands to donkey Cadbury and goat Ebony. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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Bruce the alpaca, Lucy the llama, Cadbury the donkey and Ebony the brown goat, all of which are rescue animals, sweetly vied for food and attention from their young visitors.

The annual event is a major fundraiser for the FFA program at OHS, and, sadly, was the last Farm Fest for Patti Williams. Williams, the long-time and beloved director of the school’s thriving agriculture program, will be retiring at the end of this school year. She has grown not only successful student, but also the program, introducing sustainable farming methods, including aquaculture and vertical gardening.

VPHS girls golf

The Villa Park High School girls golf team was named 2018 CIF Southern Section Academic Team Champions, and received a championship banner prior to the Angels vs. Orioles game at Angel Stadium of Anaheim.

The Villa Park High girls varsity golf team, center from left, Maleah Kammerlohr, Kristin Lam, Sydney Chandler, Kelly Bryan, Ellie Wilson, Emilie Nguyen, and front, Melody Nguyen and Lenna Lazarre, with Head Coach Chris Salio and Assistant Coach Mark Kammerlohr, were honored at Angel Stadium for academic achievement. (Courtesy of the OUSD Communications Lab)
The Villa Park High girls varsity golf team, center from left, Maleah Kammerlohr, Kristin Lam, Sydney Chandler, Kelly Bryan, Ellie Wilson, Emilie Nguyen, and front, Melody Nguyen and Lenna Lazarre, with Head Coach Chris Salio and Assistant Coach Mark Kammerlohr, were honored at Angel Stadium for academic achievement. (Courtesy of the OUSD Communications Lab)

The team, coached by Chris Salio, included Kelly Bryan, Sydney Chandler, Maleah Kammerlohr, Kristin Lam, Lenna Lazarre, Emilie Nguyen, Melody Nguyen and Eille Wilson. The student-athletes earned a collective 3.92 grade point average, the highest in the enrollment category of 1,500 or more students.

History bell dedication

Prior to its Open House on May 29, Villa Park Elementary School will welcome former students, families, teachers and supporters to a community dedication of the historic bell from the school building that once stood on the site.

Two unused school buildings in the center of the campus, built in a Spanish Revival Style and dating back to 1920, were deemed unsafe and razed in 2017. Orange Unified School District salvaged and restored the large, 500-pound, cast iron bell from the bell tower, plus a crest from the historic building, to create a monument placed in the center of the quad. Local civic groups have contributed for a bronze plaque affixed to the monument.

A welcome reception will commence at 5:30 p.m., with the bell dedication ceremony at 6 p.m. The Open House will be held from 6:30  to 8 p.m.

Open houses

School open houses are an excellent opportunity to preview a school, meet the teachers and administrators, speak with other parents, learn about the school culture and get a glimpse of the level of work expected in each grade.

It is not a time for in-depth discussions, but a chance for the student and family to preview a class, follow up with research, and determine if it is the right “fit” for the student. Today, there are many schooling options.

Open houses have been announced for May 22 at: Anaheim Hills Elementary, 6 to 7:30 p.m.; Fairhaven Elementary, 6 to 7 p.m.; Imperial Elementary, 6 to 7:30 p.m.; McPherson Magnet School, 6 to 7:30 p.m.; Nohl Canyon, 5:45 p.m. to 7 p.m.; Panorama, 6 to 7:30 p.m.; and Prospect, 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Two schools will hold their open house on June 5: California Elementary from 5:30 to 7 p.m., and Sycamore Elementary from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Space travel

Anaheim Public Library will host NASA@ My Library from 6 to 7 p.m. on  May 24 at the Central Library, 500 West Broadway in Anaheim.

NASA Solar System Ambassador Brandon Eastman will present “Myths vs. Realities of Space Travel in Hollywood Movies,” as part of the series. The program is free, and open to students and families.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/17/orange-high-ffa-students-show-off-their-farm-and-livestock/

Palmyra’s Ballet Folklorico students showcase their steps

The Palmyra Elementary School playground became a whorl of color and artistry, as students in the afterschool enrichment program performed two special Ballet Folklorico programs for peers, families and supporters.

The 23 first- and second-graders in the beginning class shared the elegance and traditional style of the Jalisco region. The girls proudly twirled in brightly colored, full skirts, their hair in a bun, adorned with ribbons, while the boys danced the intricate steps to the Mariachi music wearing the traditional white shirts and sombreros. The dancers were: Emily Martinez, Giselle Campos, Grace Garcia, Jazmin Arteaga, Jocelyn Hilario, Alan Medina, Alex Medina, Jesus Silvia, Leanne Almazan, Marely Salinas, Mateo Castellanos, Rodrigo Leon, Vivian Perez, Daisy Leon, Julie Manzo, Leilani Barrera, Samantha Segura, Sebastian Hernandez, Wendy Sanchez, Crystal Gomez, Michael Sanchez, Sophia Hernandez and Vanessa Bernal.

  • Ballet Folklorico Jalisco dancers Vanessa Bernal, Alex Medina, Leilany Berrera at a performance at Palmyra Elementary School. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Ballet Folklorico Jalisco dancers Vanessa Bernal, Alex Medina, Leilany Berrera at a performance at Palmyra Elementary School. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Partners Alex Medina and Leilany Barrera performing Ballet Folklorica in the Palmyra Elementary School’s afterschool enrichment program finale. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Partners Alex Medina and Leilany Barrera performing Ballet Folklorica in the Palmyra Elementary School’s afterschool enrichment program finale. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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  • Mateo Castellanos and Jazmin Arteaga dance during Palmyra Elementary School’s afterschool enrichment program finale. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Mateo Castellanos and Jazmin Arteaga dance during Palmyra Elementary School’s afterschool enrichment program finale. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Mia Eloiza, Alexa Lopez, Lenika Virgin Lopez dance to music from the Sinaloa region of Mexico during the  Palmyra Elementary School Ballet Folklorico performance. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Mia Eloiza, Alexa Lopez, Lenika Virgin Lopez dance to music from the Sinaloa region of Mexico during the Palmyra Elementary School Ballet Folklorico performance. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • The beginning and advanced Ballet Folklorico participants in the afterschool enrichment program at Palmyra Elementary School with teacher Ana Gonzalez. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    The beginning and advanced Ballet Folklorico participants in the afterschool enrichment program at Palmyra Elementary School with teacher Ana Gonzalez. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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The advanced class, comprised of 15 second- and third-graders, shared the unique dances of the Sinaloa region, the girls clad in embroidered peasant blouses, with flowers in their hair, holding and swirling their full skirts in time to the Banda music. The dancers included: Jocelyn Coyomani, Angel Rodriguez, Madelynn Seehusen, Mia Eloisa, Brianna Santiago, Genesis Silverio, Jazmin Salgado, Aracely Ochoa, Bo Barnes, Heidi Medina, Lenika Virgen Lopez, Joshua Villasaldo, Alex Lopez, Kendra Juarez and Zaid Reyes.

The Ballet Folklorico program, taught by Ana Gonzalez, is in its second year at Palmyra. Each student group meets once a week, from mid-February until May. It is an opportunity for the students to learn more about the culture and traditions of Mexico through dance.

The afterschool enrichment program is one of several 10- to 12-week programs offered free of charge to the students. Principal Brenna Godsey and her team have worked to expand afterschool offerings for the students, using a variety of funding sources. The program for the GATE-designated school now includes chess, robotics, karate, a  STEAM lab, public speaking, origami, Lego engineering and track.

Award and scholarship season

Orange Elks Lodge 1475 awarded prizes of $100 each to three seventh-grade students for their winning essays on “Why our veterans are America’s heroes.” The winning authors were Cole Morgan, Juliet Otellio and Aubrey Valdez, all students at McPherson Magnet School.

  • Villa Park Women’s League Philanthropic chairs Angela Fasbender, left, and Linda Cornue, right, flank scholarship recipients Matthew Houlihan and Abby Mills; scholarship recipient Wyatt Bui, not shown. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Villa Park Women’s League Philanthropic chairs Angela Fasbender, left, and Linda Cornue, right, flank scholarship recipients Matthew Houlihan and Abby Mills; scholarship recipient Wyatt Bui, not shown. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Assistance League of Orange 2018 scholarship recipients, from left, include Garrick Jensen, Logan Eldridge, Sydney To, Julianna Janes, Gerardo Pena, Thy Tran, Maybelline Martinez, Janette Avalos and William Le Bauer. (Courtesy of Catherine Rose)

    Assistance League of Orange 2018 scholarship recipients, from left, include Garrick Jensen, Logan Eldridge, Sydney To, Julianna Janes, Gerardo Pena, Thy Tran, Maybelline Martinez, Janette Avalos and William Le Bauer. (Courtesy of Catherine Rose)

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  • Miss City of Orange Eileen Kim, McPherson Magnet School history teacher Jay Turner, and winning essayists Aubrey Valdez, Juliet Otellio and Cole Morgan, all McPherson Magnet School seventh graders, and Elroy T. Elk. (Courtesy of Kimberly Otellio)

    Miss City of Orange Eileen Kim, McPherson Magnet School history teacher Jay Turner, and winning essayists Aubrey Valdez, Juliet Otellio and Cole Morgan, all McPherson Magnet School seventh graders, and Elroy T. Elk. (Courtesy of Kimberly Otellio)

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The Assistance League of Orange awarded scholarships to 11 high school seniors. Eight outstanding recipients received merit scholarships, based on their academic standing, test scores, leadership and community involvement: Janette Avalos, Orange High, who will pursue a nursing degree at Santa Ana College; Maybelline Martinez, Orange High, who will attend UCSB for pre-med to become a cardiothoracic surgeon; Logan Eldridge, Canyon High, who will major in electrical engineering at Cal Poly Pomona; Garrick Jensen, Canyon High, will double major in biology and chemistry at Harvey Mudd College; Juliana Janes,  El Modena High School, will major in environmental studies and science at UCSB; Gerardo Pena, Villa Park High, who will major in biology and pre-med at Case Western Reserve University; Thy Tran, Villa Park High, who will major in mechanical engineering at UCLA; and Tracey Chiem, Villa Park High, who will  attend either UCLA or UC Berkeley to work toward becoming a physician assistant.

William Le Bauer, El Modena High School, was awarded the Eugenia Love Arts Scholarship. He is a talented pianist, who will be double-majoring biological sciences and piano performance at Chapman University, with plans to be an emergency room physician.

Two students received the Alfreda Niewig Nursing Scholarship, awarded to students who plan careers in the medical field. Darren Fan, El Modena High, will major in pharmaceutical science at UCI. Sydney To, Villa Park High, will study physiological science at UCLA, with plans to pursue a career as a physical therapist or physician assistant.

The Villa Park Women’s League awarded three merit scholarships to graduating senior residents, based on their academic achievement, activities and an essay discussing the greatest challenge of their generation, and how it differs from the challenges faced by their grandparents. The recipients were: Wyatt Bui, Servite High, who plans to study political science and economics at University of Notre Dame; Matthew Houlihan, Villa Park High, who will study business administration at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo; and Abby Mills, Villa Park High, who will pursue a degree in education and music therapy at Boise State University.

Fun fundraisers

Two fun family fundraisers will be held on Saturday, May 12.

The Villa Park High School Instrumental Music Boosters will hold its 16th annual car and bike show, with registration and check-in beginning at 6 a.m. and gates opening at 8 a.m. at the school, 18074 E. Taft. The event is free for spectators, and includes vendors, Mother’s Day roses by the dozen, live music, Rose’s famous barbecue, raffles and silent auctions. See vphscarsow.com for further information.

The Orange High FFA will hold its annual Farm Fest, with gates opening from noon to 4 p.m. at the Panther Farm, located inside the campus, off the corner of Walnut and Harwood. The $3 admission charge, or $5 with lunch included, allows families to view the plants and farm animals raised by the students, interact with petting zoo residents, plus demonstrations, games, prizes and more.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/10/palmyras-ballet-folklorico-students-showcase-their-steps/

Recognizing OUSD’s Dreamers and Doers

Walt Disney was a firm believer in possibilities and selfless giving, saying: “The greatest moments in life are not concerned with selfish achievements, but rather with the things we do for others.”

Each year, the Disneyland Resort recognizes Orange County high school students for contributions to their community and schools. Students were nominated in four areas: Strengthen Communities, Think Creatively, Conserve Nature and Live Healthier.

CJ Writer, an Orange Lutheran High School student, was recognized as an Orange County 2017-18 Luminary by the resort. CJ learned of the honor at a celebratory luncheon at Disneyland’s Grand Californian, recognizing 86 students designated as Shining Stars. Only five of the outstanding students received the elite Luminary award.

CJ was honored for planning, designing and installing a 5,000-square-foot water conservation demonstration garden at the Lenain Water Treatment Facility in Anaheim. He facilitates tours of the gardens, which help residents learn about methods to conserve water in their own gardens and lawns. As a Shining Star, he won $1,000 for Orange Lutheran and tickets to Disneyland. As a Luminary, he won an entire weekend at the resort and a $3,000 grant to designate to a local nonprofit.

Elianna Peng and Sabrina Nguyen-Hoang, both students at Villa Park High School, were named as Shining Stars.

VPHS team places in robotics competition

The Villa Park High School VEX Robotics team took second place at the annual competition held during the Imaginology event at the O.C. Fairgrounds. The team, consisting of students Jenna Achtien, Joseph Achtien, Gino Anguili, Armaan Chopra and Matthew Jelensky, competed against 43 Southern California schools.

The Villa Park High School VEX Robotics Team, from left, Joseph Achtien, Gino Anguili, Jenna Achtien, Armaan Chopra, and Matthew Jelensky took second place out of 43 teams at the Imaginology VEX competition. With them is Robotics Advisor and STEM teacher, James Hughes. (Courtesy of VPHS)
The Villa Park High School VEX Robotics Team, from left, Joseph Achtien, Gino Anguili, Jenna Achtien, Armaan Chopra, and Matthew Jelensky took second place out of 43 teams at the Imaginology VEX competition. With them is Robotics Advisor and STEM teacher, James Hughes. (Courtesy of VPHS)

Literacy learners

Angels Baseball Foundation and The Literacy Project celebrated the Anaheim and Santa Ana students who graduated from The Literacy Project’s reading program at the recent fourth annual Readers in the Outfield event.

The 100 disadvantaged students were treated to a hot dog lunch at the Angel Stadium Lexus Diamond Club. They played the New Phonics Game and had the opportunity to meet Angels alumni such as Rod Carew, Chuck Finely, Clyde Wright and Bobby Grich, plus Dennis Kuhl, chairman of Angels Baseball.

McPherson student scientists

Four projects from McPherson Magnet School won at their school science fair, and advanced to compete against projects created by students from throughout Orange County at the 63rd Orange County Science and Engineering Fair.

The four projects created by McPherson student scientists advanced to compete with 934 participants from 397 schools, who presented at the 67th California State Science and Engineering Fair. Though the McPherson projects did not win at the state level, the experience encouraged the students to work even harder for the next year’s competition, officials said.

McPherson students, under adviser Kayee Conrad, who won at the OCSEF level included Elizabeth Godoy, second place in Applied Mechanics; Zachary Barnes, first place in Fluids/Aerodynamics; Brady Fendt, second place in Fluids/Aerodynamics; Yormal Perera, second place, Physics/Astronomy; and Mackenzie Kim, honorable mention, Environmental Science.

McPherson students also received a number of special awards at the county fair. Aimee Taylor, under adviser Shannon Duncan, won the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, Southern California Section award in the junior division. Barnes was the recipient of the Lon Isenberg Memorial Award in the junior division. He was also awarded the Office of Naval Research award, junior division.

Showing teachers appreciation

National Teacher Appreciation Week will be celebrated May 7 through 11.

Schools may vary when they hold special Teacher Appreciation luncheons or events, but every day is a good day to say “thank you” to the hard-working teachers who spend hours with well-behaved and less-than-angelic students every day. They spend an enormous amount of time planning lessons, grading papers, sourcing new materials and updating their technological skills to give your student the best and help them excel each day.

Show your appreciation for that extra time spent working with your student, staying after hours to chaperone an event, or help a struggling child. An elaborate gift is not needed. A note, a flower, or just sincere words of thanks will be welcomed.

Save the date

Friends of the Orange Public Library want to encourage students to read over the summer, and have planned a Summer Book Sale featuring books for pre-schoolers, children and teens from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on June 16 at the Main Library, 407 E. Chapman Ave. Books, DVDs and CDs will be 25 cents. While at the library, students may sign up for the summer reading program.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/03/recognizing-ousds-dreamers-and-doers/

Recognizing OUSD’s Dreamers and Doers

Walt Disney was a firm believer in possibilities and selfless giving, saying: “The greatest moments in life are not concerned with selfish achievements, but rather with the things we do for others.”

Each year, the Disneyland Resort recognizes Orange County high school students for contributions to their community and schools. Students were nominated in four areas: Strengthen Communities, Think Creatively, Conserve Nature and Live Healthier.

CJ Writer, an Orange Lutheran High School student, was recognized as an Orange County 2017-18 Luminary by the resort. CJ learned of the honor at a celebratory luncheon at Disneyland’s Grand Californian, recognizing 86 students designated as Shining Stars. Only five of the outstanding students received the elite Luminary award.

CJ was honored for planning, designing and installing a 5,000-square-foot water conservation demonstration garden at the Lenain Water Treatment Facility in Anaheim. He facilitates tours of the gardens, which help residents learn about methods to conserve water in their own gardens and lawns. As a Shining Star, he won $1,000 for Orange Lutheran and tickets to Disneyland. As a Luminary, he won an entire weekend at the resort and a $3,000 grant to designate to a local nonprofit.

Elianna Peng and Sabrina Nguyen-Hoang, both students at Villa Park High School, were named as Shining Stars.

VPHS team places in robotics competition

The Villa Park High School VEX Robotics team took second place at the annual competition held during the Imaginology event at the O.C. Fairgrounds. The team, consisting of students Jenna Achtien, Joseph Achtien, Gino Anguili, Armaan Chopra and Matthew Jelensky, competed against 43 Southern California schools.

The Villa Park High School VEX Robotics Team, from left, Joseph Achtien, Gino Anguili, Jenna Achtien, Armaan Chopra, and Matthew Jelensky took second place out of 43 teams at the Imaginology VEX competition. With them is Robotics Advisor and STEM teacher, James Hughes. (Courtesy of VPHS)
The Villa Park High School VEX Robotics Team, from left, Joseph Achtien, Gino Anguili, Jenna Achtien, Armaan Chopra, and Matthew Jelensky took second place out of 43 teams at the Imaginology VEX competition. With them is Robotics Advisor and STEM teacher, James Hughes. (Courtesy of VPHS)

Literacy learners

Angels Baseball Foundation and The Literacy Project celebrated the Anaheim and Santa Ana students who graduated from The Literacy Project’s reading program at the recent fourth annual Readers in the Outfield event.

The 100 disadvantaged students were treated to a hot dog lunch at the Angel Stadium Lexus Diamond Club. They played the New Phonics Game and had the opportunity to meet Angels alumni such as Rod Carew, Chuck Finely, Clyde Wright and Bobby Grich, plus Dennis Kuhl, chairman of Angels Baseball.

McPherson student scientists

Four projects from McPherson Magnet School won at their school science fair, and advanced to compete against projects created by students from throughout Orange County at the 63rd Orange County Science and Engineering Fair.

The four projects created by McPherson student scientists advanced to compete with 934 participants from 397 schools, who presented at the 67th California State Science and Engineering Fair. Though the McPherson projects did not win at the state level, the experience encouraged the students to work even harder for the next year’s competition, officials said.

McPherson students, under adviser Kayee Conrad, who won at the OCSEF level included Elizabeth Godoy, second place in Applied Mechanics; Zachary Barnes, first place in Fluids/Aerodynamics; Brady Fendt, second place in Fluids/Aerodynamics; Yormal Perera, second place, Physics/Astronomy; and Mackenzie Kim, honorable mention, Environmental Science.

McPherson students also received a number of special awards at the county fair. Aimee Taylor, under adviser Shannon Duncan, won the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, Southern California Section award in the junior division. Barnes was the recipient of the Lon Isenberg Memorial Award in the junior division. He was also awarded the Office of Naval Research award, junior division.

Showing teachers appreciation

National Teacher Appreciation Week will be celebrated May 7 through 11.

Schools may vary when they hold special Teacher Appreciation luncheons or events, but every day is a good day to say “thank you” to the hard-working teachers who spend hours with well-behaved and less-than-angelic students every day. They spend an enormous amount of time planning lessons, grading papers, sourcing new materials and updating their technological skills to give your student the best and help them excel each day.

Show your appreciation for that extra time spent working with your student, staying after hours to chaperone an event, or help a struggling child. An elaborate gift is not needed. A note, a flower, or just sincere words of thanks will be welcomed.

Save the date

Friends of the Orange Public Library want to encourage students to read over the summer, and have planned a Summer Book Sale featuring books for pre-schoolers, children and teens from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on June 16 at the Main Library, 407 E. Chapman Ave. Books, DVDs and CDs will be 25 cents. While at the library, students may sign up for the summer reading program.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/05/03/recognizing-ousds-dreamers-and-doers/

La Purisima students showcase their creative inventions and experiments

Look out, “Shark Tank” and Science Guy! The La Purisima Catholic School student inventors and scientists are on track to take over.

Every La Purisima student in fourth- through eighth-grade was required to create an invention or conduct an experiment, and formally present that project for the school science fair. The students could select their own topics.

  • Noah Skipper, 5, a Transitional Kindergarten student at La Purisima, donned the headset for a Virtual Reality tour of Mars, a part of Preston Pham’s science project, questioning “What Planets Can We Live On?”   (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Noah Skipper, 5, a Transitional Kindergarten student at La Purisima, donned the headset for a Virtual Reality tour of Mars, a part of Preston Pham’s science project, questioning “What Planets Can We Live On?” (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Janelle Lopez, winner, fourth grade, for Solar Energy in the La Purisima Catholic School Science Fair. (Courtesy of La Purisima)

    Janelle Lopez, winner, fourth grade, for Solar Energy in the La Purisima Catholic School Science Fair. (Courtesy of La Purisima)

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  • Sara Shermoen, seventh grade, invented “Reusable Luffa Soap” for her La Purisima Catholic School Science Fair winning project. (Courtesy of La Purisima)

    Sara Shermoen, seventh grade, invented “Reusable Luffa Soap” for her La Purisima Catholic School Science Fair winning project. (Courtesy of La Purisima)

  • Ian Tjan, seventh grade, experimented with nuclear particles for his La Purisima Catholic School Science Fair project, which was one of the winners. (Courtesy of La Purisima)

    Ian Tjan, seventh grade, experimented with nuclear particles for his La Purisima Catholic School Science Fair project, which was one of the winners. (Courtesy of La Purisima)

  • Gabriella Cardenas, eighth grade, experiment, Growth in the Galaxy was one of the La Purisima Catholic School Science Fair winners. (Courtesy of La Purisima)

    Gabriella Cardenas, eighth grade, experiment, Growth in the Galaxy was one of the La Purisima Catholic School Science Fair winners. (Courtesy of La Purisima)

  • The overall winner of the La Purisima Catholic School Science Fair was Joshua Nguyen for his invention of the “No Slip Towel Grip.” (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    The overall winner of the La Purisima Catholic School Science Fair was Joshua Nguyen for his invention of the “No Slip Towel Grip.” (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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They worked on their project for an hour at school, every day for three weeks, plus after school, and tackled a wide variety of subjects, ranging from the realistic question, “How Much Pee is in Your Pool?” to the yummy-practical “How do cookies bake differently using various types of cookie sheets?”

The winners, by grade level, were:

  • Janelle Lopez, fourth grade, for her experiment “Solar Energy”
  • Danielle Taber, fifth grade, “Brown Apples”
  • mily Garcia, sixth grade, for her invention, “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle the Water”
  • Diego Cardenas, sixth grade, for his experiment “Rootbeer vs. Tea”
  • Sara Shermoen, seventh grade, for her invention of “Reusable Luffa Soap”
  • Ian Tjan, seventh grade, for his experiment “Watching Nuclear Particles”
  • Lauren Pham, eighth grade, for her invention of “The Doggie Wash”
  • Gabriella Cardenas, eighth grade, for her experiment “Growth in the Galaxy”

The overall winner was Joshua Nguyen, for his invention of the “No Slip Towel Grip.”  The imagination and execution of the projects may have QVC and Home Shopping calling soon. Other creative inventions included LED-light slippers; hands-free headgear to hold paper for reading; a backpack blower; a shoelace protector to keep the knots from coming untied; and Dangled Untangled, a gadget to keep store and keep necklaces untangled, but visible.

Students were creative in how they presented their projects. Sixth-grader Preston Pham used a virtual reality headset to show life on Mars for his project, “What Planets Can We Live On?,” while Olivia Wasson’s project board had a “Click Me for Info” button so viewers could hear a recorded explanation of her invention, “The Shoelace Protector.”  Emily Garcia’s recycling invention included a wooden house and running water, depicting the runoff and method of capturing and recycling.

Younger students, in transitional kindergarten through third-grade classes, worked as a team to form a hypothesis and use scientific procedures.

NAMM Recognition

The National Association of Music Merchants, or NAMM, Foundation, for the second time in three years, recognized Villa Park High School’s Instrumental Music program with a Support Music Merit Award.

The award recognizes the efforts of an individual school for its commitment to music education. The recognition is conferred on only 135 outstanding schools in the U.S., with Villa Park High being the only school within the Orange Unified School District to receive the award.

Charles Jay directs the extensive musical program, which includes a super band, jazz band, orchestra, the acclaimed Marchin’ Spartans parade band, a Mariachi ensemble, a Dixieland ensemble, color guard and winter guard, with flags, letters and rifles. Students may perform, on-site or off-site, more than 100 times each year, even at the Hollywood Bowl and Disneyland.

The community is invited to hear the renowned Villa Park High student musicians at the “Spy vs. Spy” concert tonight, April 26, at the VPHS Performing Arts Center. Selections from “The Incredibles,” “James Bond” movies, “Secret Agent Man,” and more, will commence at the 7 p.m. downbeat.

Also, the orchestra will play for the family musical, “Disney’s Little Mermaid” at 7 p.m. on  May 4 and at 2 p.m. on May 5. All performances will take place in the VPHS Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $10.

Farm Fest fun

Nestled inside the Orange High School campus is a working farm, maintained by hard-working agriculture and Future Farmers of America students under the tutelage of Patti Williams.

The barn doors are opened to the public only once each year – Farm Fest will be held from noon to 4 p.m. on  May 12. Admission is $3 a person, or $5 for admission with a hot dog lunch. Children and adults will enjoy seeing demonstrations of actual working farm activities, such as sheep-shearing, play games for prizes, and, of course, see and feed the many animals up close and on the hoof.

 

 

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/04/26/la-purisima-students-showcase-their-creative-inventions-and-experiments/

New school labs give OUSD students more STEAM-related opportunities

Two elementary schools are among the latest campuses in the Orange Unified School District to open STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math) labs for their students.

Canyon Rim Elementary School school recently celebrated the opening of its lab with a formal ribbon-cutting ceremony, and thanked the PTA for its generous support.

  • Running Springs Elementary School Principal Mark McLaughlin, center, helps Education Foundation President Janet Kwon cut the ribbon, formally opening the two new STEAM labs on campus. (Courtesy CommunicationsLab)

    Running Springs Elementary School Principal Mark McLaughlin, center, helps Education Foundation President Janet Kwon cut the ribbon, formally opening the two new STEAM labs on campus. (Courtesy CommunicationsLab)

  • The Canyon Rim Roadrunner welcomed students and parents to the opening of the school’s new STEAM Lab. (Courtesy of Canyon Rim)

    The Canyon Rim Roadrunner welcomed students and parents to the opening of the school’s new STEAM Lab. (Courtesy of Canyon Rim)

  • The Canyon Rim Roadrunner welcomed students and parents to the opening of the school’s new STEAM Lab. (Courtesy of Canyon Rim)

    The Canyon Rim Roadrunner welcomed students and parents to the opening of the school’s new STEAM Lab. (Courtesy of Canyon Rim)

  • Nancy Paul, former English and math teacher and athletic director at Orange Lutheran High, will be honored at a retirement party, with all proceeds benefiting a scholarship in her name. (Courtesy OLHS)

    Nancy Paul, former English and math teacher and athletic director at Orange Lutheran High, will be honored at a retirement party, with all proceeds benefiting a scholarship in her name. (Courtesy OLHS)

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The new STEAM Lab will offer a green screen, three digital screens, robotics, flexible seating and a host of supplies, such as microscopes, scales, beakers and such. The STEAM Lab will undoubtedly spark creativity and innovation, and prepare students for careers of the future.

And, thanks to the efforts of campus parents, Running Springs Elementary recently opened two STEAM labs. One is for lower-grade classes, and a second will be used by the older students.

Over two years ago, seven Running Springs parents formed the Education Foundation of Anaheim Hills to raise awareness and funding for classroom technology. Foundation President Janet Kwon emphasized the need for updated tools and technology to support education in coding, digital photography, robotics, and STEAM to engage and inspire today’s students.

Canyon film students send messages

Talented Canyon High School film students, under the direction of Alex Graham, have collected awards and cash from local and state entities for their public service announcement entries.

Locally, Comanche Abigail Reese won $1,000 for her PSA for the Elks Club Drug Awareness Video Competition.

Mana Javadi won first place and $1,000 for her PSA for an Orange County Sanitation District contest, educating consumers about the importance of wastewater treatment. Fellow Comanche Carter Audet Marrero took second place in the contest, and $500. Their videos will be used as educational PSAs throughout Orange County.

In the California Directing Change contest, teams were challenged to create 60-second PSAs to prevent suicide or help change attitudes about the stigma of mental health issues. Creston Brown took first place for his film, “First Steps,” in the Mental Health Matter category in Region 1. Creston won $500, and his film will advance to statewide judging. Hallie Conrad’s film, “Proud to Be Me,” was selected as the second place winner in the Through the Lens of Culture category; she will receive a prize of $500. The third place film in the Suicide Prevention Category in Region 1 was “I Am,” created by Megan Beehler; she will earn $250.

Another film, also titled “I Am,” was submitted by the team of Colette Grob, Nick Sherman, Max Furtek and Luke Fisher. It won second place and $250 in the Mental Health Matters regional category.

“Don’t Be Afraid to Ask,” a film created by Isaac Resurreccion, Matthew Bachor and Lance Hahn was the Team Pick in the Suicide Prevention category and the second place winner in the Suicide Prevention Region 1 category. The team will receive a $250 prize. “Hear the Music, ”a film submitted by Victoria Neller was the Team Pick in the Mental Health Matters category, and received an honorable mention in the Mental Health Matters regional category.

Additional CHS student films receiving honorable mentions were “Talk About More” by Tiffany Le, and  “What Will the People Think?” by Mana Javadi, both in the Through the Lens of Culture category. The film “#StatusOfMind,” by Camille Celifie, took honorable mention in the Mental Health Matters category for the region.

El Modena pool fundraiser

The El Modena Grad Night Committee invites parents and community supporters to join in for a fun evening playing pool and socializing at Danny K’s Billiards & Sports Bar starting at 6 p.m. on  April 27. The fundraiser will help ElMo’s tradition of providing a safe and fun grad night for the Class of 2018.

The cost of $55 a person, or $100 per couple, includes dinner, darts, a silent auction and an optional pool tournament. Prizes will be awarded to the top three billiard teams. A cash bar will be available. For registration information, or to donate, contact Kris Erickson at kurtkrishome@cox.net.

Football camp planned

Canyon High School is once again offering the Mike Ogas Football Camp, to be held from 5 to 7 p.m. on May 16 and 17 at the Comanche football field.

This fourth annual camp will be open to all incoming fourth- to eighth-grade students. They will have an opportunity to meet the Canyon coaching staff and 2018 varsity players. The camp will focus on sportsmanship and character development, skill assessment and development, weight room safety, muscle training and position-specific techniques, and team-building activities.

The two-day camp costs $40; a T-shirt is included. Register prior to May 11 at canyonhighfootball.org.

Orange Lutheran to celebrate teacher

Nancy Paul, who is retiring after teaching at Orange Lutheran High School for 43 years, will be celebrated at a special event at the school beginning at 5:30 p.m. on June 15.

A tailgate party in her honor will also be a fundraiser to benefit the Nancy Paul Teaching Scholarship fund, which will support graduating seniors who choose to pursue a career in education. Attendees are encouraged the wear their Lancer gear – the older, the better.

Tickets are $25 for adults, $15 for children ages 6 to 12. See weareolu.org/nancypaul to purchase tickets or donate to the scholarship fund.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/04/19/new-school-labs-give-ousd-students-more-steam-related-opportunities/

Students battle over their book reading

Despite the siren call of texting and social media, the enjoyment of reading books is alive in local schools.

Students at St. John’s Lutheran School, Anaheim Hills Elementary and Canyon Rim Elementary recently – excitedly – participated in two separate Battle of the Books competitions.

  • The Magical Book Unicorns of Anaheim Hills Elementary are delighted with their first-prize medals. From left, Carley Teger, Hannah Gullickson, Kara Florez (Team Captain), Brynn Martindale, Gretchen Goodrich, Grace Nguyen. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    The Magical Book Unicorns of Anaheim Hills Elementary are delighted with their first-prize medals. From left, Carley Teger, Hannah Gullickson, Kara Florez (Team Captain), Brynn Martindale, Gretchen Goodrich, Grace Nguyen. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • St. John Lutheran School’s BOBbleheads took fourth place in the annual Battle of the Books. In back are Michael Coury, Christina Vaughan, Trinity Laurenson-Aumua; front, Jack Schirmacher, Mattias Kremer, and Hope Hayes. (Courtesy of St. John Lutheran School)

    St. John Lutheran School’s BOBbleheads took fourth place in the annual Battle of the Books. In back are Michael Coury, Christina Vaughan, Trinity Laurenson-Aumua; front, Jack Schirmacher, Mattias Kremer, and Hope Hayes. (Courtesy of St. John Lutheran School)

  • The Mustang Hollow team from St. John’s Lutheran School won second place in the annual Battle of the Books.In backa are Zach Schutt, Ella Kennedy, Grace Gragner, Grace Morgan; and in front are Joshua Grack and Lucas Winter. (Courtesy of St. John’s Lutheran School)

    The Mustang Hollow team from St. John’s Lutheran School won second place in the annual Battle of the Books.In backa are Zach Schutt, Ella Kennedy, Grace Gragner, Grace Morgan; and in front are Joshua Grack and Lucas Winter. (Courtesy of St. John’s Lutheran School)

  • A St. John’s Lutheran School team read a clue for the Battle of the Books relay races. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    A St. John’s Lutheran School team read a clue for the Battle of the Books relay races. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • The Canyon Rim Reading Roadrunners listen closely as their opponents answer a Battle of the Books question. The team includes, Victoria Flores, Evelyn Daw, Eleanor Payne, Giovanni Flores, Nicole Nguyen, and Andrew Daileda. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    The Canyon Rim Reading Roadrunners listen closely as their opponents answer a Battle of the Books question. The team includes, Victoria Flores, Evelyn Daw, Eleanor Payne, Giovanni Flores, Nicole Nguyen, and Andrew Daileda. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • The colorful Battle of the Books teams gathered for a post-battle photo. From Anaheim Hills Elementary, the Flaming Rocks in orange, champion Magical Book Unicorns in pink, and second-place Battle of the Book Champions in blue. The Canyon Rim teams were the Bobnados in blue, Firecrackers in green and Reading Roadrunners in red. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    The colorful Battle of the Books teams gathered for a post-battle photo. From Anaheim Hills Elementary, the Flaming Rocks in orange, champion Magical Book Unicorns in pink, and second-place Battle of the Book Champions in blue. The Canyon Rim teams were the Bobnados in blue, Firecrackers in green and Reading Roadrunners in red. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Holy Family Cathedral School seventh and eighth grade students set up fun carnival-style booths for the interactive teaching of science concepts to younger students and parents. (Courtesy of Holy Family)

    Holy Family Cathedral School seventh and eighth grade students set up fun carnival-style booths for the interactive teaching of science concepts to younger students and parents. (Courtesy of Holy Family)

  • El Modena Give and Grow clubmembers volunteered during their weekends to work with Habitat for Humanity. In back are Luke Reissmueller, Gabe Dommes, Nick Real, and in front are Luke Blackburn, Andy McCormick, James Zisk, Sarah Ando, Mikayla Reyes, Megan Formanowicz, Sophia Pracilio, Club President Julia Mast, Danielle Fujimoto and Jillian Reilly. (Courtesy of El Modena High)

    El Modena Give and Grow clubmembers volunteered during their weekends to work with Habitat for Humanity. In back are Luke Reissmueller, Gabe Dommes, Nick Real, and in front are Luke Blackburn, Andy McCormick, James Zisk, Sarah Ando, Mikayla Reyes, Megan Formanowicz, Sophia Pracilio, Club President Julia Mast, Danielle Fujimoto and Jillian Reilly. (Courtesy of El Modena High)

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In a tradition spanning a decade, fourth-grade St. John’s students read 18 to 20 books and take a test to earn a spot on a team to compete in the annual face-off. They read in the car, on the weekends, before bed and sometimes “sneak books under our desks.” Surprisingly, the majority of readers prefer paper or audio books to tablets.

Then, if chosen for a team by Librarian Deanna Barber, they work with a coach for 30 minutes every week, re-reading and poring over the designated books to answer 20 timed questions per round, beginning “In which book …”

Their challengers are teams from other private schools in the region. On battle day, the celebration of reading and books continued through the lunch hour, with fun relay race clues based on the books. The final two rounds, pitting the top four teams against one another, commenced after lunch, resulting in St. John’s teams taking second and fourth place.

The second place Mustang Hollow team was comprised of Joshua Grack, Grace Granger, Ella Kennedy, Grace Morgan, Zach Schutt and Lucas Winter. The St. John’s BOBbleheads team, the fourth-place finishers, included Michael Coury, Hope Hayes Mattias Kremer, Trinity Laurenson-Aumua, Jack Schirrmacher and Christina Vaughan.

Anaheim Hills Elementary held its third annual Battle of the Books recently, but this year, instead of an intraschool bout, they vied against Canyon Rim Elementary teams.

Each school brought three teams of fourth-graders to the battle, all of whom had read and studied 10 books for the contest. Anaheim Hills Librarian Kathy Short worked with the dedicated readers during their lunch hour each week.  Librarian Angie Simkin coached the Canyon Rim teams for their inaugural battle.

After five heavy-duty rounds, the final showdown pitted two Anaheim Hills teams against one another: the boys team, Battle of the Book Champions, comprised of Andrew Chen, Vince La Gatta, Colin Kim, Matthew Simmons and Buddy Tetnowski, under Team Captain Spencer Winsberg, versus the girls team, Magical Book Unicorns, with Team Captain Kara Florez and Gretchen Goodrich, Hannah Gullickson, Brynn Martindale, Grace Nguyen and Carley Teger.

The Magical Unicorns won by only one point.

Students hold science convention

As an alternative to a typical science fair, Holy Family Cathedral School junior high introduced a Science Convention, based on the premise that thorough knowledge of a subject allows one to teach the subject.

Students in seventh and eighth grade worked in cooperative groups on assigned science concepts, learning the material, then developing lesson plans and preparing presentations. They created colorful, fun booths and designed intriguing activities to teach the material, engaging and educating younger students and parents about their assigned concepts.

El Modena’s Project Give and Grow

“It made me feel so good to make a difference.”

That was the sentiment shared by Julia Mast, president of Project Give and Grow, a student club at El Modena High School that seeks to give back to others. This year, the students decided to help Habitat for Humanity.

A group of about 18 of the club’s 40 members worked together painting and building. The students donated their free weekend time – totaling 176 hours –  to help build houses for deserving families.

The club also solicited donations and did fundraiser at the school’s basketball games, allowing them to present a check for $2,700 to a Habitat family to help in furnishing their newly constructed home. The students were allowed to select the family they wanted to assist. The family they chose, which included a grandmother, mother, and two children, was thrilled to begin a new life in their new home with such a gift.

The students plan to continue their rewarding work with Habitat for Humanity. Lowell Benner is their club advisor.

 

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/04/03/students-battle-over-their-book-reading/

Science fair is serious fun at McPherson school

Slime, skittles and science were – surprisingly – combined at the McPherson Magnet School Science Fair.

The campus, which emphasizes science and math, required its students of all ages to participate in an annual science fair. The students are encouraged to choose a topic of personal interest for their science fair project hypothesis, and for many in kindergarten through fifth grade, slime, gummy worms or M&Ms were the topic of choice.

The younger students use the same process as their older mentors: forming a hypothesis, testing the hypothesis, recording the data, making a display board to show their work and presenting the results in a formal presentation to the judges

  • Kindergartener Oliver Mendoza, dressed formally in a bow tie and lab coat, took first place in the kindergarten division. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Kindergartener Oliver Mendoza, dressed formally in a bow tie and lab coat, took first place in the kindergarten division. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • First-grader Gia Garcia took first place in her division; here, she is judged by Peyton McDonough, an eighth grader. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    First-grader Gia Garcia took first place in her division; here, she is judged by Peyton McDonough, an eighth grader. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • First-grade student Alyssa Mastrioanni waits to have her project be judged; she won second place. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    First-grade student Alyssa Mastrioanni waits to have her project be judged; she won second place. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Kindergarten student Dominic Schmidt is judged by eighth-grade student Lauren Flanagan; the judges knelt down, to get on eye level with the younger students. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Kindergarten student Dominic Schmidt is judged by eighth-grade student Lauren Flanagan; the judges knelt down, to get on eye level with the younger students. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Alyssa Galasso, a first-grade student, is ready to have her science project presentation judged by Peyton McDonough, an eighth-grade student. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Alyssa Galasso, a first-grade student, is ready to have her science project presentation judged by Peyton McDonough, an eighth-grade student. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • First-grade student Macie Brooks explains her gummy worm science project to Jackson Bates, her eighth-grade judge. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    First-grade student Macie Brooks explains her gummy worm science project to Jackson Bates, her eighth-grade judge. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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An earlier science fair event was held for the older students, in grades six through eight. Those students’ projects were judged by adult volunteers – the winners continue on to compete in the Orange County Science and Engineering Fair. In a turnaround, those older students were then asked to judge the younger students’ science fair projects. It was eye-opening for the older students, as  they asked questions and used the same metrics to judge the younger students’ projects.

The kindergarten through fifth grade science fair winners will receive recognition at a special ceremony at the school:

Kindergarten Division: Oliver Mendoza, first place; William Van Roggen, second place; Lauren Minaya, third place; Adeline Olsgaard, Olivia Halter, honorable mention.

First grade: Gia Garcia in first place; Alyssa Mastrioanni in second place; Nathan Lew, third place; Olivia Low, Eli Jewell, honorable mention.

Second grade: Liliana Mastroianni, first place; Ava Peery, second place; Sara Dinh, third place; Joshua Sanchez, Christian Lazaro, honorable mention.

Third place: Makayla Frith in first place; Ava Merritt, second place; Trey Esperanza, third place; Diego Reyes, Daniel Dillon, honorable mention.

Fourth grade: Derek Torres, first place; Abigail Barnes in a second place tie with Isaih Covarrubias; Luke Bennet took third place; Ava Garcia, Avery Owen, honorable mention.

Fifth grade: Victoria Barajas and Charlie Lopez, first place; Bram Richardson, second place; Martin Ok, third place; Ben Astor and Ulyssess River, honorable mention; Justin Manahan, honorable mention.

Covenant wins championship

Covenant Christian School Christian Athletic League of Orange County champions hoist the trophy: in back are Coach Josh Vandenberg, Sean Fan, Josh Azucena, Kyan McCarville, Ethan Hanning and Alexis Laine; in front are Jeffrey Johnson, Matteo Laine, Cade McCarville and Mark Johnson, Caleb Azucena, and Coach Tom Daley. (Courtesy Covenant Christian School)
Covenant Christian School Christian Athletic League of Orange County champions hoist the trophy: in back are Coach Josh Vandenberg, Sean Fan, Josh Azucena, Kyan McCarville, Ethan Hanning and Alexis Laine; in front are Jeffrey Johnson, Matteo Laine, Cade McCarville and Mark Johnson, Caleb Azucena, and Coach Tom Daley. (Courtesy Covenant Christian School)

Covenant Christian School’s junior high basketball team won the 2017-18 Christian Athletic League of Orange County championship title, after a perfect 12-0 season.

Tom Daley and Josh Vandenberg coached the victorious team, including: Matteo Laine, fourth grade; Jeffrey Johnson and Caleb Azucena, fifth grade; Cade McCarville and Mark Johnson, seventh grade; and Kyan McCarville, Alexis Laine, Ethan Hanning, Sean Fan, and Josh Azucena, eighth grade.

Registration for the 2018-19 school year is open. For information, see covschool.org or call 714-998-4852.

EL Modena is Pathway Model

El Modena High School recently hosted school administrators and teachers from throughout the state, as an exemplary example of integrated college and career pathway programs.

Attendees at the Linked Learning Convention held recently in Anaheim had the option of a site visit to El Modena, to learn more about the Career Technical Education Pathways programs in eight industry sectors now offered at the school. Following a tour, which included students demonstrating the classroom curriculum, a panel discussion explained the program benefits in more detail.

El Modena offers dual credits and classes that link to college courses, also allowing college credit. Taking the courses in high school help reduce the time and cost of college, as students do not need to duplicate the course.

Students may elect to take an introductory course and more advanced courses that allow the student to graduate with certification and college credit in specific pathways, such as graphic design, professional dance or video production within the Arts, Media and Entertainment Pathway. Other pathways included Education and Child Development; Business and Finance; Engineering; Health Science and Medical Technology; Hospitality, Tourism and Recreation; Computer Science; Information and Communications Technology; and Public Service.

The pathways allow students to take UC-approved courses, gain specific knowledge and practice hands-on applications within their chosen field, becoming college and career-ready. El Modena students in the Culinary Arts program, a career focus within the Hospitality Pathway,  catered 125 box lunches for the convention attendees.

A long-term goal for the program, said Principal Dustin Saxton, is an internship for each pathways student during their senior year, so as to further explore the career choice. For information about El Modena’s model CTE Pathways program, see elmodenahs.org.

 

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/03/14/science-fair-is-serious-fun-at-mcpherson-school/

Schools celebrate reading and Dr. Seuss’s lasting legacy

“The more that you read, the more thigs you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

– From “I Can Read With My Eyes Shut!” by Dr. Seuss

Across the nation, what would have been Dr. Seuss’ 113th birthday on March 2 was observed in schools and libraries. The children’s author who made tongue-twister, nonsensical words and phrases rhyme and sing with lyrical melodies, inspired students of all ages to read, and imparted lessons on the importance of caring and believing in one’s limitless potential.

  • Linda Vista Elementary student Jackson Norville, third grade, wears his crazy hat and is ready to craft a critter with substitute teacher Stacey Orr. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Linda Vista Elementary student Jackson Norville, third grade, wears his crazy hat and is ready to craft a critter with substitute teacher Stacey Orr. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Kayla Vu, a first grader at Linda Vista, concentrates on stacking yertles at the before-school Dr. Seuss celebration. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Kayla Vu, a first grader at Linda Vista, concentrates on stacking yertles at the before-school Dr. Seuss celebration. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Enjoying the Dr. Seuss breakfast celebration are, from left, student teacher Charlie Grant, first-grader Audrey Hatch, third-grader Cole Hatch, first-grader Leilani Jacome and fourth-grade teacher Tammy Winslow, all in their wild and crazy hats. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Enjoying the Dr. Seuss breakfast celebration are, from left, student teacher Charlie Grant, first-grader Audrey Hatch, third-grader Cole Hatch, first-grader Leilani Jacome and fourth-grade teacher Tammy Winslow, all in their wild and crazy hats. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Sixth-grader Caleb and third-grader CJ Szychulda posed for the Thing 1 and Thing 2 photo booth. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Sixth-grader Caleb and third-grader CJ Szychulda posed for the Thing 1 and Thing 2 photo booth. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Preschooler Andrea O’Hara concentrated on the Legos. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Preschooler Andrea O’Hara concentrated on the Legos. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Trent Yoshikawa, a second grader, and his grandmother, Karen Yoshikawa, play a “green Eggs and Ham” tic-tac-toe game. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Trent Yoshikawa, a second grader, and his grandmother, Karen Yoshikawa, play a “green Eggs and Ham” tic-tac-toe game. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Fourth-grader Santiago Anchia wore his crazy hat while playing one of Seuss-inspired STEAM games. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Fourth-grader Santiago Anchia wore his crazy hat while playing one of Seuss-inspired STEAM games. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • The hat Jolie Kanno, a first grader, wore for Crazy Hat/Dr. Seuss Day is gigantic. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    The hat Jolie Kanno, a first grader, wore for Crazy Hat/Dr. Seuss Day is gigantic. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Mother Karen Torres, Librarian Linda McCausland and third-grader Johan Perez are dressed in character for the Dr. Seuss Day festivities. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Mother Karen Torres, Librarian Linda McCausland and third-grader Johan Perez are dressed in character for the Dr. Seuss Day festivities. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Orange High School ensemble rehearsal of “Into the Woods.” (Courtesy of Aaron Jacoby)

    Orange High School ensemble rehearsal of “Into the Woods.” (Courtesy of Aaron Jacoby)

  • Named to Villa Park High’s Winter Formal court were, from left, King Sutherland Nguyen, Sydney To, Matthew Houlihan, Francesca Galuppo, Matthew Lanzone, Olivia Meis, Sarah Crowe, Steven Banks, Queen Sydney Chandler, Haylie Munda, and Bijan Mehdizadeh. (Courtesy of Villa Park High)

    Named to Villa Park High’s Winter Formal court were, from left, King Sutherland Nguyen, Sydney To, Matthew Houlihan, Francesca Galuppo, Matthew Lanzone, Olivia Meis, Sarah Crowe, Steven Banks, Queen Sydney Chandler, Haylie Munda, and Bijan Mehdizadeh. (Courtesy of Villa Park High)

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At some local schools, classes donned the iconic red-and-white striped hats, special guests read to students and teachers prepared “green eggs and ham.”

Linda Vista Elementary School invited students and their families to begin their day with a “STEAM Ahead with Dr. Seuss” event. Working parents enjoyed the early morning opportunity to be with their children, partaking of Seuss McMuffins, crafting “crazy character critters,” playing “Yertle the Turtle Stack ‘em,” planting “Loraxs seeds,”  coloring maps of “The Places You’ll Go,” posing in the Thing 1 and Thing 2 photo booth, doing puzzles and more.

Librarian Linda McCausland and her helpers worked into the night, creating a colorful and imaginative Seussville for Linda Vista families to enjoy, culminating in a rousing singing of “Happy Birthday” to Dr. Seuss. To add to the fun, the day was declared “Crazy Hat Day,” and students wore their most fantastical chapeaus.

Orange High on stage

Orange High School will present the spring musical, “Into the Woods,” today, March 7, through Saturday, March 10. Curtains open at 7 p.m. in the Little Theater, 5252 North Shaffer St.

The ensemble show will include 23 Panther cast members from drama and choir, including: Jesus Lozada as the Narrator; Brandon Lezama as the Baker; Daniella Sanchez, as the Baker’s Wife; Abigail Chocholaty as Cinderella, with Megan Walthers as Cinderella’s Stepmother,  Ezekiel Muniz as Cinderella’s Prince, Claudia Rico as Cinderella’s Mother and Justin Kiefer as her Father; Krista Kiefer is Rapunzel, and Zeus Villasana plays her Prince; Madeleine Chocholaty as the Witch; Jenna Hendrickson plays Florinda; Kim Rengel is Lucinda; Amberley Reyes plays Little Red Riding Hood, and Daniel Hinojose is the Wolf, and Analyssa Amezcua is Granny; Jacob Jacoby portrays Jack, with Nicole Johnson as the Giant; Andrea Badillo as Jack’s Mother; Chris Gomez is the Mysterious Man; Fernando Ramos, as the Steward; Stacey Osnaya takes the role of Milky White; Cindy Noriega plays Sleeping Beauty, and Nicole Johnson portrays Snow White.

Tickets are $5 for students, $10 or $15 for adults, and may be reserved by leaving a message at 714-997-6293.

Imaginology Youth STEM Expo

Registration is open for Imaginology, which is going “FULL S.T.E.A.M AHEAD” this year to celebrate the exploration and discovery of science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics. Sstudents in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade who live or attend school in Orange County are eligible to be entered in the many competitions for Imaginology, slated for April 13-15 at the Orange County Fairgrounds in Costa Mesa.

There is no entry fee, but entries are due before 6  p.m. on Friday, March 9. Group or individual entries are open to students in grade-level and special needs divisions. Get creative and sew a garment or accessory out of unusual materials for the Fashionista! Project; build something amazing out of cardboard for Cardboard Engineering; create jewelry, wood and metal arts, 3D printing, kinectic art, projects from clay or computer generated art; enter poetry, painting, farmology, photography or film.

See www.ocfair.com/imaginology for ideas to inspire and motivate. On-site competitions include Scarecrow and Steampunk Hat competitions.

Open Enrollment

Online open enrollment continues through March 16 for schools in the Orange Unified School District. See orangeusd.org for the forms and information.

ElMo baseball

Support the El Modena High baseball program when you cheer for the Angels. Purchase ticket vouchers for the 2018 Angels season from an ElMo baseball player, or online at elmobaseball.org. Vouchers are $20, and may be redeemed for one ticket in View MVP, Left Field Pavilion, Field Reserved or Club Loge seats. For questions, contact Tom Large at 949-212-2360.

 

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/03/07/schools-celebrate-reading-and-dr-seusss-lasting-legacy/

Girl Scout planning event to prepare students to safely navigate college party scene

Per the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, four out of every five college students drinks alcohol.

Many students begin experimenting during their high school years, but, now away from home without parental supervision or knowledge, college students are open to an entirely new culture.

When Colette Grob’s older sister went off to college, the Canyon High School junior listened in as her mother and sister discussed the dangers of campus partying, and how to safely navigate those issues. Later, when word of the death of a student in a hazing incident became national news, Colette wondered how she could help students to be safe, “so another parent won’t get a phone call at home that their child died on campus” because of drinking.

She found a way.

Colette, a Girl Scout from Troop 1171, has devoted innumerable hours to organizing the reality-based event: “Four Out of Five.” The event will also serve as her Gold Award Project, helping her earn the highest achievement in Girl Scouts.

She invites high school juniors and seniors, and their parents, to attend the free, walk-through event depicting vignettes based on actual college campus events involving drinking, peer pressure, sexual assault and the party scene. Attendees will then meet with a panel of experts to learn how to navigate those treacherous waters.

“A lot of students don’t have parents, like my mom, who will talk about the dangers of campus life,” Colette said. “I hope that this will help some students and parents begin a dialogue.”

Colette, who plans to major in film, has gathered volunteers to assist with set up and tear down, and is recruiting actors from CHS. She is writing three dynamic scripts, basing it on real-life situations, as gleaned from discussions with current and recent college students. Each of three rooms in the private home will feature a different reality-based scenario.

The fourth room will include a panel of professionals, yet to be named, to offer advice and answer questions about campus safety.

Though the walk-through is slated to last only 30 minutes a person, Colette is hopeful the impact of “Four Out Of Five” will be much more lasting. She wants each person’s college experience to be memorable – and safe.

“Four Out of Five” will take place April 21 at a private residence in Anaheim Hills. For information, see www.fouroutoffive.weebly.com; the event is free, but registration is requested, see the website.

College prep offered

Santiago Canyon College will host a free workshop to help students and parents complete financial aid and application information for college from 5 to 7  p.m. today, Feb. 28.

Take along 2016 federal income tax information and a Social Security number or Permanent Residency Card to receive hands-on assistance in both Spanish and English with the FAFSA, which is used universally for federal student aid, and the Cal-Dream Act.

General college information and SCC college application assistance will also be provided in the E-Building, third floor, at Santiago Canyon College.

McPherson science fair

McPherson Magnet School is notable for its emphasis on science and math. All students compete in the school’s annual science fair each year, with sixth-, seventh- and eight-graders vying to continue and compete against students from throughout the area at the Orange County Science and Engineering Fair.

  • Seventh-grade students Jonathan Tabb answers questions for Judge Manuel Bass about his project, “The Balancing Act”. He will compete at the Orange County Science and Engineering Fair. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Seventh-grade students Jonathan Tabb answers questions for Judge Manuel Bass about his project, “The Balancing Act”. He will compete at the Orange County Science and Engineering Fair. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Colette Grob, a Girl Scout from Troop 1171 and a Canyon High School junior, is producing a reality event, “Four Out Of Five,” about college drinking and partying to help students and their parents become more aware, start a dalogue, and give them tools to stay safe. (Courtesy Troop 1171)

    Colette Grob, a Girl Scout from Troop 1171 and a Canyon High School junior, is producing a reality event, “Four Out Of Five,” about college drinking and partying to help students and their parents become more aware, start a dalogue, and give them tools to stay safe. (Courtesy Troop 1171)

  • McPherson Magnet School sixth-graders Jolette Hernandez, left, and Sofia Merritt selected the safety of water for their science project. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    McPherson Magnet School sixth-graders Jolette Hernandez, left, and Sofia Merritt selected the safety of water for their science project. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Sam Astor, a seventh-grader at McPherson Magnet School is prepared to discuss his project testing the “5 second rule” or “Does the amount of time food spends on the ground affect the amount of bacteria growth?” He will compete with his project at the Orange County Science and Engineering Fair. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Sam Astor, a seventh-grader at McPherson Magnet School is prepared to discuss his project testing the “5 second rule” or “Does the amount of time food spends on the ground affect the amount of bacteria growth?” He will compete with his project at the Orange County Science and Engineering Fair. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Brady Fendt, a seventh-grade student at McPherson Magnet School, will compete at the Orange County Science and Engineering Fair with his project, “Soaring High with Rockets.”(Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Brady Fendt, a seventh-grade student at McPherson Magnet School, will compete at the Orange County Science and Engineering Fair with his project, “Soaring High with Rockets.”(Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Nate Gutierrez, a seventh grader at McPherson Magnet School, will compete at the Orange County Science and Engineering Fair with his project, “The American Dream: A Better Night’s Sleep.” (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Nate Gutierrez, a seventh grader at McPherson Magnet School, will compete at the Orange County Science and Engineering Fair with his project, “The American Dream: A Better Night’s Sleep.” (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Blake Scherer, a McPherson Magnet School seventh grade student, learned that red candles burn faster than other colors. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Blake Scherer, a McPherson Magnet School seventh grade student, learned that red candles burn faster than other colors. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Andrew Lim, right, is judged by volunteer Michelle Tabb regarding his project, “Does the type of food affect the amount of eggs laid by a quail?” (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Andrew Lim, right, is judged by volunteer Michelle Tabb regarding his project, “Does the type of food affect the amount of eggs laid by a quail?” (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

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Students select an area of interest, and spend weeks researching, recording  and testing their hypothesis on topics such as “Does the amount of time food spends on the ground affect the amount of bacteria growth;” or “Will a different wing shape affect a rocket’s maximum altitude;” or “What alarm clock noise leaves you more alert when you wake up?” The students present their research and findings to a minimum of three volunteer judges.

The following McPherson Meteors will continue to the county fair: sixth-graders Darina Dang and Alexis Tran, Aimee Taylor, Tatum Dwyer; seventh-grade students Sam Astor, Brady Fendt, Nate Gutierrez, Jonathan Tabb, Aubrey Valdez and Niko Gutierrez; and eighth-graders Acts Avenido and Jackson Bates, Laren Flanagan and Madison Oymaian, Mackenzie Kim, Isabel Aguilar, Zachary Barnes, Yormal Perera, Ethan Nguyen, Izzy Day, Jena McBratney and Elizabeth Godoy.

Open houses

School open houses are an opportunity for students and parents to meet potential teachers for the next school year, view classrooms, observe the level of work required at the next level, talk with administrators and get a feel for the school culture and values.

Santiago Charter Middle School will open its doors for parents and new families beginning at 6 p.m. on Thursday, March 1. Portola Middle School will host an open house between 4:30 and 6 p.m. on March 8.

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/28/girl-scout-planning-event-to-prepare-students-to-safely-navigate-college-party-scene/

Orange Unified School District students’ drug awareness videos win awards

Orange Elks Lodge 1475 announed that a video by Cerro Villa Middle School’s Ryann White, “Erase Your Mistakes,” was selected as the Best Middle School Drug Awareness Video for 2017-18 at both the lodge and district level. The video will continue to state competition.

At the high school lovel, “Love Letter” by Abigail Dooley of Canyon High School was named Best High School Drug Awareness Video in the lodge and district competition. It will continue on to state competition.

Check out the videos on YouTube.

  • Chelsea Tsai, a VPHS student, was elected 2017-18 lieutenant governor-elect of Key Club Division 4 East. (Courtesy Patricia van Voorst)

    Chelsea Tsai, a VPHS student, was elected 2017-18 lieutenant governor-elect of Key Club Division 4 East. (Courtesy Patricia van Voorst)

  • Josephine Pham, left, recently served as the 2016-17 Key Club lieutenant governor; Chelsea Tsai, right, is the 2017-18 lieutenant governor-elect. Both are Villa Park High students. (Courtesy Patricia van Voorst)

    Josephine Pham, left, recently served as the 2016-17 Key Club lieutenant governor; Chelsea Tsai, right, is the 2017-18 lieutenant governor-elect. Both are Villa Park High students. (Courtesy Patricia van Voorst)

  • Orange High School Marine Corps JROTC cadets, Second Lt. Angelica Alvarez, Cadet Capt. Kelly Banderas, Cadet Sgt. Natali Flores, and Cadet Sgt. Reyna Sanchez, presented the colors at the Anaheim Ducks hockey game; the singer was Dawn Wright. (Courtesy of Courtesy MCJROTC)

    Orange High School Marine Corps JROTC cadets, Second Lt. Angelica Alvarez, Cadet Capt. Kelly Banderas, Cadet Sgt. Natali Flores, and Cadet Sgt. Reyna Sanchez, presented the colors at the Anaheim Ducks hockey game; the singer was Dawn Wright. (Courtesy of Courtesy MCJROTC)

  • The Orange High School Marine Corps JROTC Honor Guard at the Nixon Library. (Courtesy of MCJROTC)

    The Orange High School Marine Corps JROTC Honor Guard at the Nixon Library. (Courtesy of MCJROTC)

  • The OHS Marine Corps JROTC drill team, dressed, before the competition.(Courtesy MCJROTC)

    The OHS Marine Corps JROTC drill team, dressed, before the competition.(Courtesy MCJROTC)

  • The Orange High School JROTC drill team, winners of the Commanders Cup. (Courtesy MCJROTC)

    The Orange High School JROTC drill team, winners of the Commanders Cup. (Courtesy MCJROTC)

  • The El Modena Showcase featured information on numerous classes and programs. Here, teacher Pratibha Pathak displays her students’ graphic design work. (Courtesy El Modena)

    The El Modena Showcase featured information on numerous classes and programs. Here, teacher Pratibha Pathak displays her students’ graphic design work. (Courtesy El Modena)

  • A student in the Engineering Pathway shows his solar cell project. (Courtesy El Modena)

    A student in the Engineering Pathway shows his solar cell project. (Courtesy El Modena)

  • El Modena students in the Education and Child Development career pathway show off their “babies” at the annual El Modena Showcase. (Courtesy El Modena)

    El Modena students in the Education and Child Development career pathway show off their “babies” at the annual El Modena Showcase. (Courtesy El Modena)

  • Science Dept. Chair Lori Rivera and her students display a few of the items from the school science curriculum. (Courtesy El Modena)

    Science Dept. Chair Lori Rivera and her students display a few of the items from the school science curriculum. (Courtesy El Modena)

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VPHS student chosen as Key Club lieutenant governor

Chelsea Tsai, a Villa Park High School student, is the 2017-18 lieutenant governor-elect of the Key Club Division 4 East. Her position is responsible for the oversight of more than 300 Key Club members from 12 area high schools.

Villa Park High has produced a large number of lieutenant governors, and at a least one governor for the oldest and largest student-led service program for high school students. Josephine Pham from Villa Park, recently served as  the 2016-17 lieutenant governor.

Orange High School JROTC active with competitions, events

The Orange High School Marine Corps Junior ROTC team had a busy January participating in competitions and ceremonies.

The team brought home 11 awards, including the coveted Commanders Cup, presented to the top performing school at the annual Coachella Valley Drill Meet, held at Desert Hot Springs High School. The OHS JROTC also competed at the Ramona High School Drill Meet.

The OHS cadets also proudly presented the colors and provided an honor guard at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library & Museum wreath-laying ceremony for the president’s birthday commemoration, and presented the colors at an Anaheim Ducks hockey game.

El Modena showcases its offerings

El Modena High School held its annual showcase, in lieu of an open house, to give current, new and prospective students and their families greater insights into the school’s many course, program and career pathways offerings.

Students displayed their works from advanced video, science, culinary, graphic design and other classes and were available to answer questions. Information was also provided abut AP and honors classes, athletics, counseling and the Career Technical Education Pathways.

Yoga Mat supports students

Local business The Yoga Mat teaches de-stressing and relaxation techniques to El Modena High School students during Wednesday lunch hours. The Yoga Mat provides the lessons on the campus free of charge, as part of its commitment to give back to the local community.

Science fair open to all

The 13th annual Community Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math (STEAM) night will, for the first time, be open to the public.

Budding student scientists and their families are invited to explore and have fun with more than 50 hands-on activities, such as creating catapults, making lava lamps, viewing cool bugs, plants and gems, racing snails and more. There will also be a Robotics Showcase, a Digital Tech Festival and Inquiry Investigations. The Maker’s Challenge will feature student-designed inventions. Food trucks and music will up the fun quotient.

The event will be held from 5:30  to 8:30 p.m. on March 23 at Santiago Canyon College, 8045 E. Chapman Ave., in Orange. The event is sponsored by Santiago Canyon College and the Orange Unified School District.

Canyon High School 2018 Hall of Fame

Canyon High will induct Lance Eddy, Dr. Eric Lin and Mike Weinkauf into the 2018 Comanche Hall of Fame at the annual gala March 24 at the Yorba Linda Country Club.

Lance Eddy was CHS’s girls athletic director and a physical education teacher, math teacher and softball coach, taking Canyon to eight Century League titles. Lin, a Canyon alum and three-time league tennis champion, is an orthopedic surgeon, focusing on spinal conditions. Weinkauf was part of CHS’s inaugural staff, and taught English, history and speech, coached football and wrestling; he was an early adapter of video technology and incorporated video production into the curriculum.

In addition to the Hall of Fame induction, live and silent auctions, cocktails, dinner and dancing will benefit Canyon High School and the Canyon High School Foundation Gymnasium renovation project. Early bird tickets, purchased prior to Feb. 24, are $70; standard tickets are $80 a person, with tables of 10 available for $650. For sponsorship or donation information, see canyonhs.foundation/halloffame or call Minika Oza at 310-729-7704 or Jane Pappas at 714-333-5505.

 

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/14/orange-unified-school-district-students-drug-awareness-videos-win-awards/

Villa Park students host inaugural Serve-A-Thon

Spartan Serve-A-Thon

“Everybody can be great, because anybody can serve.”

– Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Inspired by King’s commitment to service, students at Villa Park High School decided to honor his legacy by creating the VPHS Serve-A-Thon.

  • Villa Park High School student Ellie Wilson, left, and Preslee Burke, right, enjoyed visiting and making fleece blankets with seniors at the Kirkwood Assisted Living home in Orange during the Serve-A-Thon organized to give back to the community in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy. (Courtesy of VPHS)

    Villa Park High School student Ellie Wilson, left, and Preslee Burke, right, enjoyed visiting and making fleece blankets with seniors at the Kirkwood Assisted Living home in Orange during the Serve-A-Thon organized to give back to the community in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy. (Courtesy of VPHS)

  • VPHS Spartans Jacob Vlasin, Olivia Martian, Joanna Enriquez, Alexis Schulenz, Aliana Huerta, Jackie Vu, Grace Koussa, Stacy Arriaga, Charolette Bengry and Aaron Duyan collected and organized more than 100 bags of clothing for the Salvation Army, as part of the VPHS Serve-A-Thon. (Courtesy of VPHS)

    VPHS Spartans Jacob Vlasin, Olivia Martian, Joanna Enriquez, Alexis Schulenz, Aliana Huerta, Jackie Vu, Grace Koussa, Stacy Arriaga, Charolette Bengry and Aaron Duyan collected and organized more than 100 bags of clothing for the Salvation Army, as part of the VPHS Serve-A-Thon. (Courtesy of VPHS)

  • Villa Park High School students Natalie Venegas, Benji Martinez, Giovanni Camponovo, Gladys Garcia, Alexis Aguilar, Evianna Elizarranas and Jason Ravalo gave back to their community and honored Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by serving food at Mary’s Kitchen during the Serve-A-Thon. (Courtesy of VPHS)

    Villa Park High School students Natalie Venegas, Benji Martinez, Giovanni Camponovo, Gladys Garcia, Alexis Aguilar, Evianna Elizarranas and Jason Ravalo gave back to their community and honored Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by serving food at Mary’s Kitchen during the Serve-A-Thon. (Courtesy of VPHS)

  • VPHS students participated in the school’s first Serve-A-Thon by cleaning at the Orange Ronald McDonald House. From left, are Brenda Reyes, Daisy Dominguez, Arturo Ochoa, Elizabeth Cortez, Andrew Carrera, Sophia Galindo, Alex Luna and Eduardo Vasquez. (Courtesy of VPHS)

    VPHS students participated in the school’s first Serve-A-Thon by cleaning at the Orange Ronald McDonald House. From left, are Brenda Reyes, Daisy Dominguez, Arturo Ochoa, Elizabeth Cortez, Andrew Carrera, Sophia Galindo, Alex Luna and Eduardo Vasquez. (Courtesy of VPHS)

  • Melanie Neller, an eighth grade student at El Rancho Charter Middle School, en route to weekend practice to perform with the SCSBOA. (Courtesy of Lisa Neller)

    Melanie Neller, an eighth grade student at El Rancho Charter Middle School, en route to weekend practice to perform with the SCSBOA. (Courtesy of Lisa Neller)

  • Melanie Neller, shown here at the Musco Center for the Arts before her performance, is an eighth grade student at El Rancho Charter Middle School. She auditioned and won first chair for cello at the performance of the Southern California School band and Orchestra Association. (Courtesy of Lisa Neller)

    Melanie Neller, shown here at the Musco Center for the Arts before her performance, is an eighth grade student at El Rancho Charter Middle School. She auditioned and won first chair for cello at the performance of the Southern California School band and Orchestra Association. (Courtesy of Lisa Neller)

  • Cub Schout Troop 850 Webelos Ben Brown, Charles Schroeder, David Razon, Sean Halperin, Brodie Davis, and Gavin Cevallos visited with Trustee Andrea Yamasaki in the Orange Unified School District board Room to learn about community involvement. (Courtesy of Jodi Halperin)

    Cub Schout Troop 850 Webelos Ben Brown, Charles Schroeder, David Razon, Sean Halperin, Brodie Davis, and Gavin Cevallos visited with Trustee Andrea Yamasaki in the Orange Unified School District board Room to learn about community involvement. (Courtesy of Jodi Halperin)

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On Jan.  15, King’s birthday and a school and national holiday, dozens of VPHS Spartans from Link Crew, National Honor Society, Operation Package Club, plus the Cerro Villa Middle School WEB class gave up their day off to go out into the community to serve others.

Serve-A-Thon students assisted five local community organizations.

At Mary’s Kitchen, an all-volunteer group in Orange that provides that breakfast, lunch and showers for disadvantaged individuals six days per week, the students prepped and served more than 200 meals and 200 sack lunches. The students collected and organize more than 100 bags of clothing that were donated to the local Salvation Army.

At the Ronald McDonald House of Orange County, a temporary home for parents and families of critically ill children undergoing treatment at CHOC, the Spartans cleaned the house and all of the toys. At Kirkwood Assisted Living and Memory Care, Villa Park High students spent time with the senior citizens, enjoying “amazing conversations” while making fleece blankets. For the Friendly Center in Orange, which serves low-income families, the Spartans created more than 100 hygiene bags to give out.

Student leaders spent months contacting community leaders and organizations, preparing and coordinating before the first Serve-A-Thon. Principal Kenneth Miller commended the students for choosing to make a difference in the lives of others by participating and giving back to their community.

El Rancho celloist earns first chair

Eighth-grade El Rancho Charter Middle School student Melanie Neller was selected to play with the Southern California School Band and Orchestra Association (SCSBOA) in the Middle School Honors String Orchestra at the Musco Center for the Arts at Chapman University.

Neller, who is first chair cello in the El Rancho orchestra, auditioned and competed against hundreds of other applicants from throughout Southern California to earn First Chair Cello for the SCSBOA orchestra.

Neller started playing the cello only two years ago, during sixth grade. Her love of the instrument and music have inspired her to take private lessons, as well as to practice to achieve this level of expertise.

Film screening will address teens in digital age

The El Modena High PTSA will sponsor a free showing of the movie “Screenagers,” focusing on teens’ use of smartphones, tablets and computers for everything from classwork to gaming to social media. The one-hour movie will begin at 6:45 p.m. on Feb. 22 in the El Modena Cafeteria, 3920 Spring St.

The movie was created by a physician, and will offer information and strategies for parents to deal with device use today as students grow up in the digital age. A brief panel discussion will follow the screening. The event is free and open to the community.

CHS Grad Night

There’s no need to cook today, Feb. 7, when you can dine with family and friends, or get to-go orders, from BJ’s, and support the Canyon High School Grad Night. Between noon and 9 p.m., the CHS Grad Night Committee, striving for a safe celebration for all Canyon 2018 grads, will receive 20 percent of the sales. BJ’s is at 8188 E. Santa Ana Canyon Road in Anaheim Hills; phone 714-787-3580 for take-out orders.

El Rancho open enrollment

Students and families considering middle school at El Rancho Charter Middle School may tour the campus at 1:30 p.m. on Feb. 14, or 3:30 p.m. on March 6. Phone the office, 714-997-6238, for a reservation. Open enrollment for the 2018-19 school year will begin on March 5 and close at 5 p.m. on March 16.

 

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/05/villa-park-students-host-inaugural-serve-a-thon/

Science Olympiad team powered by dedication of students, coaches

Parent volunteers may make a significant contribution at school – even when their own students are no longer attending.

Five Canyon High School parent coaches, plus two teachers, are instrumental in the on-going success of the Canyon Science Olympiad Team. It is their involvement that, for more than a decade, has inspired the students to reach the state competition level every year.

Head Coach Rob Lewis, whose daughter graduated from Canyon in 2014, has been involved in Science Olympiad since Briley first participated on the Cerro Villa Middle School Olympiad team.

  • The dedicated Canyon High School Science Olympiad coaches at 9 a.m. on a Saturday: parent Chris Chen; teacher Abe Cassis; parent Gordon Itow; parent and Head Coach Rob Lewis: teacher Hanh Nguyen; parent Eddie Huab; and parent Rob Barretto. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    The dedicated Canyon High School Science Olympiad coaches at 9 a.m. on a Saturday: parent Chris Chen; teacher Abe Cassis; parent Gordon Itow; parent and Head Coach Rob Lewis: teacher Hanh Nguyen; parent Eddie Huab; and parent Rob Barretto. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Austin Nguyen and Tyler Sanchez fine-tune their Hovercraft for Science Olympiad competition during a Friday evening workshop. (Courtesy of Rob Lewis)

    Austin Nguyen and Tyler Sanchez fine-tune their Hovercraft for Science Olympiad competition during a Friday evening workshop. (Courtesy of Rob Lewis)

  • Nazanim Iranzamini and Conner V.O., far right, are ready to test the accuracy of their Mousetrap, powered by two mousetraps and engineered to push a paper cup, reverse, then go forward, stopping accurately. John Tran, center, will time the actions at a very respectable 16 seconds. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Nazanim Iranzamini and Conner V.O., far right, are ready to test the accuracy of their Mousetrap, powered by two mousetraps and engineered to push a paper cup, reverse, then go forward, stopping accurately. John Tran, center, will time the actions at a very respectable 16 seconds. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Canyon students Austin Nguyen and Tyler Sanchez work on their Mission Possible Rube Goldberg-like device on a Friday night at Coach Lewis’ workshop. (Courtesy of Rob Lewis)

    Canyon students Austin Nguyen and Tyler Sanchez work on their Mission Possible Rube Goldberg-like device on a Friday night at Coach Lewis’ workshop. (Courtesy of Rob Lewis)

  • Austin Nguyen, a senior at Canyon High, practices in the chemistry laboratory for the Forensics competition. He will compete in five categories. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Austin Nguyen, a senior at Canyon High, practices in the chemistry laboratory for the Forensics competition. He will compete in five categories. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • Bridget Long, a junior, works with Coach Chris Chen, calculating the temperature of water after it sits in an insulated box for the thermodynamics competition. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

    Bridget Long, a junior, works with Coach Chris Chen, calculating the temperature of water after it sits in an insulated box for the thermodynamics competition. (Courtesy of Andrea Mills)

  • El Modena students Emma Timmermans, a freshman, and Landon Jacobs, a junior, launched the first El Modena Mountain Bike Team. (Courtesy of Danielle Jacobs)

    El Modena students Emma Timmermans, a freshman, and Landon Jacobs, a junior, launched the first El Modena Mountain Bike Team. (Courtesy of Danielle Jacobs)

  • El Modena students Emma Timmermans and Landon Jacobs, founders of the first El Modena Mountain Bike Team lead out on the trails. (Courtesy of Danielle Jacobs)

    El Modena students Emma Timmermans and Landon Jacobs, founders of the first El Modena Mountain Bike Team lead out on the trails. (Courtesy of Danielle Jacobs)

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He has watched numerous students, even his own daughter, find their niche and their passion because of the broad categories and hands-on learning Science Olympiad offered outside the classroom. Briley was always interested in astronomy, but during her years competing in the Olympiad, she discovered astrophysics and planetary science. She will graduate this spring from Columbia University with a degree in astrophysics and two successful NASA internships, looking forward to graduate school.

The coaching staff also includes dads Rob Barretto, Chris Chen, Eddie Huab and Gordon Itow, and teachers Hanh Nguyen and Abe Cassis. Collectively, the coaches have 38 years of Olympiad knowledge and experience to share with their students.

The coaches also share their hard-earned knowledge of the rules, procedures, materials and equipment with other schools and teams. Tammy Draughon, an AP physics teacher and Olympiad coach from Great Oak High School, commended the CHS coaching staff for their helpful and supportive assistance at the Great Oak Invitational.

“The Canyon coaches helped all the students – not just their own team – to have a good opportunity to compete and succeed” at an optimum level. They also, she shared, stepped in to help new coaches run the competitions correctly, within the precise national parameters. “They were truly unselfish.”

Draughon said she believes there is a direct correlation between the top-ranked teams and their coaching staff: “The better teams have involved, present coaches, supportive adults that are invested in the students and the program.”

The Canyon coaches spend a minimum of three hours every Saturday morning with the students, plus Wednesday nights in a garage and Friday nights engineering in a workshop, from September through April. And, there is travel to all-day competitions. “It is,” joked Lewis, “the longest season of any sport.”

At the beginning of the year, interested students test for acumen in diverse topics such as herpetology, remote sensing, optics, rocks and minerals – there are 23. Those students interested in engineering work together, until the coaches assign them to specific partners and projects. Two teams of 15 students each compete at invitational meets until, before the regional meet, the CHS Olympiad team is culled to 15 students, with three alternates. As each of the 23 events requires a team of two, the students must compete in multiple events. (Austin Nguyen, a senior, is competing in five events: forensics, chemistry lab, materials science, optics, and dynamic planet.)

In addition to their normal homework, the students study five to eight hours on their own each week, learning about in-depth subjects not covered in their classes, such as severe storms, ecology, astronomy, microbes, anatomy and physiology, in order to quickly answer questions, solve problems and analyze data. They study for Fermi Questions, which covers a wide range of obtuse topics, such as: how many grains of sand can fit in a basketball? They take practice labs for forensics and thermodynamics. They practice coding for Game On, which required the coding of a game in 50 minutes.  They practice technical writing for the Write It/Do It category, which requires one partner to write a description of a contraption for another student, who must attempt to recreate it using only that written description.

They hone their engineering skills, building a fragile tower of balsa wood, weighing only 9 grams that can support 15 kilograms of sand. They designed and built a delicate-looking helicopter with balsa, Mylar and powered by a rubber band and hovercraft that propels itself.

Canyon recently took eighth place out of 30 teams at an invitational meet, and is on-track, prepping for the regional competition on Feb.10, when 31 Orange County teams will compete at UCI. Lewis and the coaches are looking for another opportunity to take their hard-working team to state – and beyond. But mostly, he and the other Science Olympiad coaches are justifiably proud of their students, and the impact their experience and knowledge, as volunteers, has made on the lives of so many students and parents.

El Modena’s mountain bike team

It was kismet.

Landon Jacobs, a junior at El Modena High, found team sports to be anxiety-inducing because of Asperger’s, so he turned to more individual sports.  He enjoyed playing golf and other solo sports, but found mountain biking to be his passion.

Mountain biking is also a dangerous sport. Jacobs, a teen, was allowed to join Linked Cycling, a men’s cycling group, to safely bike with others.

Wearing a Linked T-shirt to a pool party was the serendipitous prompt for an introduction to another mountain biking enthusiast, Emma Timmermans. Emma was, coincidentally, an incoming freshman at El Modena.

The two joined forces and, in a few short months, founded the El Modena High School Vanguard Mountain Bike Team, under the auspices of the National Interscholastic Cycling Association.

They collaborated to find a sponsor and coaches — and now have a team of 11 bikers. They practice on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday each week, under the direction of their very supportive coaches, Roscoe and Robin Litchard. They are currently prepping for their first association race, “Beach to Boulders,” at Lake Perris on Feb. 24. The team will participate in the association’s five-race series, traveling to Vail Lake, Lake Isabella and Tehachapi before, hopefully, being invited to participate in the state championship at Petaluma.

The team has worked to raise money for equipment, fees and costs. They hosted a bike swap meet, and, last weekend, held their first El Modena MTB Bike-A-Thon fundraiser. Donations for the fledgling club continue to be accepted; contact elmodenamtb@gmail.com.

Landon said he plans to seek scholarships at a college with mountain cycling teams, his goal being a degree in mechanical engineering with a minor in cycling studies – and later developing and riding the ultimate bike.  Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/01/31/science-olympiad-team-powered-by-dedication-of-students-coaches/

Canyon student takes to skies alone

While some students were lazing over the winter holiday break, Mia Kuyumjian reached a milestone:  the Canyon High School junior completed her first solo flight at Fullerton Airport.

Mia is part of the CHS Aviation Program headed by Steve Smith, and completed Aviation I and II classes at Canyon before passing her FAA private pilot written exam last spring.

  • After the first solo flight, a flight training tradition is to cut the back of the new pilot’s shirt, and mark it to commemorate the event. Mia Kuyumjian proudly holds her commemorative shirt. (Courtesy of Canyon Aviation)

    After the first solo flight, a flight training tradition is to cut the back of the new pilot’s shirt, and mark it to commemorate the event. Mia Kuyumjian proudly holds her commemorative shirt. (Courtesy of Canyon Aviation)

  • Vincent Cho, Panorama Elementary, was a winner in the Visual Arts – Primary Division. (Courtesy of the Orange Community Council PTA Reflections Arts Program)

    Vincent Cho, Panorama Elementary, was a winner in the Visual Arts – Primary Division. (Courtesy of the Orange Community Council PTA Reflections Arts Program)

  • Elizabeth Teng, from Crescent Elementary, won in the Middle School Division for Visual Arts. (Courtesy of the Orange Community Council PTA Reflections Arts Program)

    Elizabeth Teng, from Crescent Elementary, won in the Middle School Division for Visual Arts. (Courtesy of the Orange Community Council PTA Reflections Arts Program)

  • Zachary Yuan, of Canyon High School, won in the Visual Arts – High School Division. (Courtesy of the Orange Community Council PTA Reflections Arts Program)

    Zachary Yuan, of Canyon High School, won in the Visual Arts – High School Division. (Courtesy of the Orange Community Council PTA Reflections Arts Program)

  • A Prospect Elementary student is excited about the robot’s capabilities at the El Modena High Hour of Code event. (Courtesy of El Modena High)

    A Prospect Elementary student is excited about the robot’s capabilities at the El Modena High Hour of Code event. (Courtesy of El Modena High)

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After the written exam, she completed hours of flight training with an instructor, and earned the instructor’s endorsement for a solo flight.  After additional training with an instructor, the aviatrix was ready to take a ride with an FAA-approved examiner, consisting of a multiple-hour oral exam and a flight test.

Mia passed with flying colors, and is on track to be a licensed pilot before beginning her senior year.

She said she will continue to pursue her pilot’s license, with the goal of a career as an aerospace engineer.

Reflections on display

The 26 talented Orange Unified School District students who received an Award of Excellence in the Orange Community Council PTA Reflections Arts Program, and advanced to the Fourth District PTA level competition, will be celebrated at a art gallery and award ceremony from 1 to 4 p.m. on Feb. 10 at the Orange County Department of Education offices, 200 Kalmus Drive, in Costa Mesa.

The students’ work will be showcased, and each will learn if their artwork will be advanced to the state level competition.

The National PTA Reflections Program offers students the opportunity to creatively express themselves in a variety of art forms, including dance, literature, photography, film, music and the visual arts. The art is judged within five grade-level categories, including a Special Artists category, and, each year, has a theme. This year, the assigned theme was “Within Reach.”

Hour of Code

El Modena High School computer science students, under the direction of teacher Chris Warrior, recently hosted 65 fourth-grade students from Prospect Elementary School for an Hour of Code.

The worldwide Hour of Code is designed to demystify code-writing and provide an introduction to computer science, emphasizing its accessibility to every student.  Guided by the high school students, the elementary students explored the robots and used “Scratch to Code.”

Galas planned by schools

Lancer alumni, parents and supporters are invited to the 15th annual Power of the Dream Gala, “Saved by Grace,” celebrating 45 year of ministry at Orange Lutheran High School.

The glamorous event will commence at 5p.m. on March 3, and will include a gourmet dinner, performances and auctions.

Tickets are $150 per guest prior to Feb. 15, $175 after. Sponsorships are also available. See weareolu.org/gala for information.

The “Anchored in Hope” gala, sponsored by Salem Lutheran School is slated to begin at 5:30 p.m. on March 9 at the Cultural Center of Christ Cathedral, 13280 Chapman Ave.,in Garden Grove.

Alumni, supporters and families are invited to enjoy auctions and dinner, in support of the school.  See salemorange.com for ticket and sponsorship information.

Register for the 2018-19 school year

Registration for transitional kindergarten and kindergarten programs starting in the fall in Orange Unified School District will open on March 7.  Parents may register at the student’s home school, or – new this year – register online, and provide the necessary documentation at the home school later.

Students with birthdates between Sept. 2 and Dec. 2, 2013 may only attend transitional kindergarten. Students with birthdates between July 1 and Sept. 1, 2013 may attend kindergarten or TK.

Open enrollment for all students, kindergarten through high school, will be held March 5 through March 16.

Registration for McPherson Magnet School Feb. 8 at the school.

Pancake breakfast time

There is no better way to start your day than hot-off-the griddle pancakes, carefully flipped by City Council members, Rotarians and the school principal.

The Spartan Pancake Breakfast, open to the community, will be 7 to 11 a.m. on Feb. 3 at the Villa Park High School campus. Coordinated by the VPHS PFSO, and sponsored by Colleary’s Bistro, with music by the instrumental music students, the proceeds will fund school programs.

Tickets are $8, and may be purchased in the office, or from a participating student.

 

Send your photos and school news to Andrea Mills at OCSchoolNews@aol.com.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/01/24/canyon-student-takes-to-skies-alone/