Category: Argentina Rugby

Argentina Rugby News

Oct 08

Wallabies end Rugby Championship on winning note in Argentina

Australia post hard-earned 37-20 win in MendozaReece Hodge stars for Wallabies with two tries and a hand in two othersThe travel-weary Wallabies rounded out their 2017 Rugby Championship campaign with a hard-earned 37-20 win over Argentina in Mendoza.T…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/oct/08/wallabies-end-rugby-championship-on-winning-note-in-argentina

Sep 16

Wallabies 45-20 Argentina: Rugby Championship – as it happened

1.43pm BST

Related: Late blitz seals comeback victory for Wallabies against Pumas

1.10pm BST

“I didn’t have to say anything,” Michael Cheika said about his half-time team talk. “I asked them what was going on and they told me lack of urgency…. they sorted themselves in the second half and that was better rugby from us.”

1.08pm BST

Well the Wallabies have done what was expected of them just in an unexpected way. The final score was probably about right by the end, but at the end of the first half it looked like Australia were in serious trouble. Just how much their improvement in the second half was due to their own ability and how much was due to Argentina tiring badly is up for debate. I strongly suspect it was a combination of both.

For my money the key passage of play was early in the second half when the Pumas threw everything at the Wallabies line only to come up short. They looked dead on their feet after that, and the late try fest was no surprise.

12.50pm BST

Foley adds the extra points and the whistle blows. That’s all she wrote – the Wallabies were as clinical in the second half as they were off the pace in the first.

12.48pm BST

80 min: Australia ignore the siren, charge towards the line and Uelese bundles the ball over. There’s the icing on the cake.

12.46pm BST

78 min: Sanchez hits it home from the edge.

12.44pm BST

77 min: Moroni with a perfect chip and chase to get the scoreline more respectable. Great skill.

12.42pm BST

76 min: Foley adds the cherry. This has been a Jekyll and Hyde performance by the Wallabies.

12.41pm BST

75 min: McMahon with the pass to Phipps who’s brought down just short of the line but pops it over with an outstretched hand

12.40pm BST

74 min: Foley kicks the Wallabies further ahead, in off the post.

12.39pm BST

73 min: Well it’s been a long time coming but the Wallabies are finally over the line again. The line was wide open from the scrum, Genia saw the opening and hurled himself through it.

12.37pm BST

Terrific captaincy by Michael Hooper to keep the pressure on with a dominant scrum and draw the yellow card. #AUSVARG

12.37pm BST

71 min: A card for Argentina. It’s been coming. Pieretto marches off after more pressure on the Pumas scrum.

12.35pm BST

69 min: Oof. The Wallabies get it away from the scrum, charge to the line but get held up again. Kerevi this time. Back we go.

12.33pm BST

68 min: The ref is getting impatient with the Argentina scrum. The Wallabies have piled on the pressure. The latest infringement sparks a bin warning. Hooper asks about a penalty try … doesn’t get much of a response.

12.31pm BST

66 min: McMahon is held up over the line and the Wallabies get the scrum. That would have been a kick in the teeth for the Pumas after all that pressure. The momentum has swung back to Australia.

12.29pm BST

65 min: The Wallabies finally get some possession and run it deep into the Argentina half. Eventually it’s turned over but play is brought back for an an earlier penalty and Foley boots it into touch about 5m out from the Argentina line.

12.26pm BST

64 min: A poor lineout and, here we go again, the Pumas bolt forward. It’s been all Argentina for the last five minutes.

12.25pm BST

63 min: Finally, the Wallabies get a penalty and the pressure evaporates. That’s heartbreaking stuff for the Pumas who threw everything at the line and came up short. Great defence.

12.24pm BST

61 min: The Pumas can practically smell the try line but the Wallabies have defended admirably, repelling everything that’s been thrown at them. So far.

12.23pm BST

60 min: More excellent defence from the Wallabies. Just when it looked like the Pumas had dived over in the corner, the Wallabies throw their bodies underneath to keep it out. Still in the danger zone though.

12.21pm BST

58 min: Heart-in-mouth time for the Wallabies. They defend brilliantly on the line to keep the Pumas out originally, then Folau gets a fingertip to a pass that would have led to a certain try. Then a stab forward causes confusion and the Wallabies defence scrambles to get it down.

12.19pm BST

56 min: Lord knows what Cheika

yelled at
said to the Wallabies during the break but it seems to have done the trick. They can’t afford to take their foot off the gas though. The Pumas are on the attack, looking for an immediate reply.

12.18pm BST

54 min: Foley with a textbook kick from the edge to add the extras.

12.17pm BST

52 min: And suddenly the game looks a lot more comfortable for the Wallabies. Genia with a long pass out to Folau who slides home. Good spell of pressure from the hosts.

12.13pm BST

50 min: Foley makes no mistake from the kick. Better from the Wallabies, who now have a bit of breathing space.

12.12pm BST

49 min: The Wallabies batter their way to the line with a hat-trick of pick-and-gos. Kepu is the man who finally gets it over the line.

12.11pm BST

“No urgency… I don’t think we realised we were in a Test match,” Cheika says of the first half during a break for the scrum. Nail meet head.

12.10pm BST

48 min: The Wallabies take a quick tap penalty, hoping to keep the pressure up on the Pumas line, but Argentina soak up the attack and the hosts are lucky to win a scrum.

12.08pm BST

47 min: It’s actually been a good bit of play by the Wallabies, but the Pumas have tackled well to deny them an opening. Plenty of phases. This will tire Argentina, but Australia need the points.

12.07pm BST

45 min: A lot of phases from both teams… but no points at the end of it. The Wallabies get a lineout and try to run the phases again… until a loose pass slips out of Folau’s grasp. They start again.

12.05pm BST

43 min: Forget I said anything. Another poor decision and it’s the Pumas who suddenly have the ball again. They’re battering the Aussie line too, fighting for every metre.

12.04pm BST

41 min: Peeeep! Off we go again. Surely the Wallabies have to step it up a gear in this half? Argentina have tended to die off a little towards the back end of games but are Australia capable of making them pay? They’ve already made numerous errors themselves this game. They’ve started this half well though. Moving the ball from right to left to right again.

11.52am BST

A few boos ring out from the sparse crowd as the Wallabies boot it into touch. The Pumas have had plenty of possession and possibly should be further ahead. Would love to hear what Cheika says to the Wallabies during the break. See you in the second half.

11.49am BST

39 min: Not long to the buzzer and the Wallabies will be glad to hear it. The way it’s been going the Pumas are the more likely side to score.

11.48am BST

37 min: Hats off to the Pumas, they’ve been the better side and but for that brief moment of excellence from the Wallabies for the try, they’d be well in front. The visitors win yet another penalty about 45m out. Sanchez goes for it but it sails wide.

11.45am BST

35 min: The Pumas pile on the pressure from the restart and earn another penalty, Kuridrani giving it away this time. This one’s much closer though and Sanchez boots it home easily.

11.43am BST

32 min: The big boot of Boffelli comes into play as McMahon gives away a penalty. Elementary error. Offside. It looks like the kick is sailing between the posts… but then it slices just wide.

11.40am BST

30 min: And the conversion from Foley is straight through the middle. We’re all square again. Cheika can breathe.

11.38am BST

29 min: The Wallabies hit back. Great ball movement and once it reached Folau on the right, there was only one outcome. He brushes off a stretching hand from the nearest defender to touch down.

11.36am BST

26 min: Good metres from a Foley kick but the Pumas have got their tails up and charge again at the Wallabies line. Argentina are good for their lead, the Wallabies are struggling to get out of second gear.

11.34am BST

Sanchez with the conversion. Pressure on the Wallabies.

11.34am BST

24 min: Well it’s given by John Lacey and Argentina are in front. Debatable but that’s the call.

11.32am BST

24 min: Landajo over the line … but is it legal? The ref goes to the TMO. Strong suggestion of offside.

11.31am BST

22 min: Well it’s not exactly been the spectacle the ARU would have hoped for so far – more of an arm wrestle really with some errors thrown in. Some good offloads from the Pumas keep the ball alive and they begin to build pressure close to the Wallabies line.

11.27am BST

20 min: Just as the Pumas look like they’re about to make the break, they’re brought back for a forward pass from Sanchez. Boffelli was in a very dangerous position then too. Warning signs for the Wallabies.

11.26am BST

17 min: Well this isn’t going according to plan for Australia. It’s been the Pumas in control for the last 10 minutes, pushing and probing without really threatening to break the line. Eventually it’s booted high and Beale takes the mark.

11.22am BST

15 min: Well after that initial dominance the Wallabies have been on the back foot for the last five minutes, literally, as the Pumas charge up the field with a rolling maul. It’s finally halted but it comes at the cost of a penalty, which is duly booted between the posts to level things up.

11.20am BST

12 min: Some, shall we say, ‘scrappy’ defence from the Wallabies to finally halt a Pumas attack down the right flank. Argentina also struggle to hold on to the ball with the try line in sight and the Wallabies get a scrum out of it to ease the pressure. It’s booted into touch and the physio immediately races onto the pitch to check on Sanchez, who hurt himself in a solid tackle on Kuridrani.

11.17am BST

10 min: The referee loses patience with the Pumas and hands it over to the Wallabies who go long, kicking deep into the Pumas half. A looping kick comes flying back and it’s as you were – with the Pumas on the attack.

11.16am BST

9 min: Well it’s been a solid start from the Wallabies, and they’ve deservedly edged in front… although there are a few signs of the Pumas fighting back. They have a scrum in the Aussie half after almost breaking the line.

11.12am BST

6 min: Foley with a simple kick from between the posts after one too many infractions from the visitors.

11.10am BST

5 min: Early stoppage as Alemanno goes down with a knock from a lineout. He takes about a minute, then hops up as healthy as you like. Wallabies back on the attack but the Pumas’ defence has held up well. So far.

11.09am BST

4 min: The Wallabies attack the left corner but Beale can’t find a way through and the Wallabies concede a penalty. Good defence from the Pumas.

11.08am BST

3 min: And that leads to a penalty which Foley boots into the corner. Early pressure from the Wallabies.

11.06am BST

1 min: Peeeeep! And we’re off. Can the Pumas spring a surprise tonight? They’ll fancy their chances after such a good showing in New Zealand… although there’s a mistake right from the off, a knock-on from Argentina as they try to pick up the Aussie kick. Australia scrum.

11.04am BST

That’s the anthems over. You could see the players’ breath frosting over in the cool Canberra air. It’s almost go time.

11.01am BST

10.58am BST

#AUSvARG Can anyone explain to me the logic of this test being played at same time as everyone’s attention is on AFL and NRL finals?

A wealth of options tonight for code-hungry Aussies. Despite that – and the chilly conditions – there’s a “decent” crowd shaping up in Canberra. Reports earlier in the week that it had sold out (when it hadn’t) didn’t help ticket sales either.

10.51am BST

Selection questions. Michael Cheika must live in a rough area because he’s changed his lock combination yet again. It’s Rob Simmons in the second row at the expense of Rory Arnold, who isn’t even in the 23. Earlier in the week, Cheika said it was to prove a point about the consistency needed from players at Test level, but surely consistent set-piece combinations is just as crucial for building success. There are plenty of question marks over Hanigan’s form too but he’s been backed for another week, possibly because no one is really pushing for his position. Marika Koroibete is poised for his debut.

Argentina have made four changes. Tomas Lezana replaces Benjamin Macone at No.8. Martin Landajo, Ramiro Moyano and Matias Orlando start in the backs instead of Tomas Cubelli, Joaquin Tuculet and Santiago Cordero.

10.50am BST

10.49am BST

Australia (15-1): Israel Folau, Henry Speight, Tevita Kuridrani, Kurtley Beale, Reece Hodge, Bernard Foley, Will Genia, Sean McMahon, Michael Hooper (c), Ned Hanigan, Adam Coleman, Rob Simmons, Sekope Kepu, Tatafu Polota-Nau, Scott Sio
Reserves: Jordan Uelese, Tom Robertson, Allan Alaalatoa, Izack Rodda, Jack Dempsey, Nick Phipps, Samu Kerevi, Marika Koroibete

Argentina: Emiliano Boffelli, Matias Moroni, Matias Orlando, Jeronimo de la Fuente, Ramiro Moyano, Nicolas Sanchez, Martin Landajo, Tomas Lezana, Javier Ortega Desio, Pablo Matera, Matias Alemanno, Guido Petti, Nahuel Tetaz Chaparro, Agustin Creevy (c), Lucas Noguera
Reserves: Julian Montoya, Santiago Garcia Botta, Enrique Pieretto, Marcos Kremer, Juan Manuel Leguizamon, Tomas Cubelli, Santiago Gonzalez Iglesias, Manuel Montero

10.47am BST

Stat blast. There are plenty of other reasons for the Wallabies to feel optimistic going into this clash, and let’s face it, Aussie rugby fans need something to cheer about this year. The statistics paint a pretty one-sided picture.

10.44am BST

Evening everyone and thanks for ignoring all that football finals nonsense going on elsewhere to join me as the Wallabies look for their first win of the Rugby Championship campaign – if you’re reading this, you’re truly a diehard fan. But before I go any further, they may have struggled recently against the Wallabies and Argentina, but reports of the All Blacks’ imminent demise seem to have been greatly exaggerated. They have just absolutely shpadonked the Springboks 57-0 – a victory so emphatic it’s forced me to invent a new word to describe it.

So I guess that’s this season’s Rugby Championship title race over then. Over to the battle to avoid the wooden spoon. And while it’s all too easy to be cynical (see my intro) in this post-truth, post-Super Rugby-season world, at least Wallabies fans have cause for optimism tonight. They may have been frustrating to watch in their last two outings against South Africa and New Zealand, but there were also signs that they can be as good as anyone when it all clicks together. Michael Cheika certainly seems to think he’s onto something good and, with the exception of one tweak, has backed the team that battled to a stalemate against South Africa last week.

7.07am BST

Richard will be here shortly. In the meantime, here’s Bret Harris on how the Wallabies have finally turned up to the party, only to find out the other revellers have moved on:

Related: Wallabies’ tactical evolution is both encouraging and discouraging | Bret Harris

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/live/2017/sep/16/wallabies-v-argentina-rugby-championship-live

Jul 10

It won’t happen any time soon but why shouldn’t the Lions tour Argentina? | Michael Aylwin

If rugby in the Americas continues to improve, a Lions tour of Argentina, USA and Canada in 16 years’ time should be seriously considered

The concept of the Lions is glowing in the aftermath of an exhilarating series, but give it a few months and the usual questions will return. One of the trickier ones is, what is the Lions for?

It was, after all, born in the amateur era, when men were men, and jobs were inconveniences from which to take a three-month break for some rugby in a far-off land. Times have changed, and so have Lions tours, those long, immersive adventures through another country, building slowly and deliciously towards a Test series, now compacted into a furious six-week fling of suffocating intensity.

Related: Lions 2017: Guardian writers present their awards for the New Zealand tour

Related: Lions did themselves proud against New Zealand – a draw was a fair result | Nick Evans

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jul/10/lions-tour-argentina-usa-canada-rugby-union

Jun 15

Sam Underhill to make England debut in Argentina as Chris Robshaw returns

• Mark Wilson and Tom Curry will make way for the pair in the second Test
• Eddie Jones welcomes back Robshaw from injury for first Test in six months

Ten new caps last weekend for England – but only the one this. Sam Underhill has been picked by Eddie Jones to start the second Test against Argentina at the Estadio Brigadier General Estanislao López. His inexperience, however, is counterbalanced by a rather more familiar proposition on the other flank of England’s scrum, where Chris Robshaw returns from injury to play his first Test in six months.

“It’s great to welcome back Robshaw into the squad,” Jones said. “He has been one of England’s best players over the last two years and he will add a lot of experience and work rate into our back row. It will also be exciting to see Sam make his debut.”

Related: Owen Farrell ruled out of Lions match against Maori with thigh injury

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/15/sam-underhill-england-debut-argentina-chris-robshaw-returns

Jun 09

Eddie Jones poised to call on most England new caps since 1947

England are set to introduce more fresh faces in one game than in any since the war when they meet Argentina in San Juan on Saturday

If Eddie Jones, assessing the situation in the expected cauldron of 25,000 locals raging beneath the Andes, decides to empty his bench – and he usually does – England will blood more new caps in this first Test against Argentina than they have since 1947.

Related: England’s Tom Curry set to be youngest Test debutant since Jonny Wilkinson

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/09/rugby-union-argentina-england-eddie-jones-new-caps

May 07

Rugby World Cup 2019 draw: Argentina promise to light up Japan’s leap into dark

The draw for the 2019 tournament takes place on Wednesday but the prospect of a group of death holds no fears for the Pumas, the world’s ninth-ranked side

Kyoto, where the draw for the 2019 World Cup takes place on Wednesday, is known as Japan’s thousand-year capital. It is unlikely to take that long for a northern hemisphere nation to win the tournament again after England’s success 14 years ago, and for once their southern hemisphere rivals are not hogging the places at the top of the world rankings.

Holding the draw more than two years before the start of the tournament is intended to give the host nation the maximum time to sell tickets. England had even longer for the 2015 World Cup, with the pools all lined up at the end of 2012. When the hosts were grouped with Australia and Wales to ensure that either the 2007 finalists or one of the 2011 semi-finalists would not make the knockout stage, the protest was loud enough for the draw to be put back six months this time. It gave the Six Nations countries a chance to improve their positions in the rankings, although at one point Wales, after defeats by England and France, were on course to slip out of the top eight again; victory over Ireland saved them.

Related: Holding 2023 Rugby World Cup in Ireland would capture hearts and minds | Robert Kitson

Related: Autumn internationals: All Blacks still top but southern powers feel Test fatigue | Paul Rees

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/may/07/rugby-world-cup-2019-draw-argentina-japan

Dec 04

Autumn internationals: All Blacks still top but southern powers feel Test fatigue | Paul Rees

New Zealand remain the yardstick but their flaws feed Lions’ hopes for next summer even though the settled order of the Six Nations is in need of a shake-up

The All Blacks remain at the top of the world rankings by a comfortable margin, but their defeat by Ireland in Chicago, which ended a record of 18 consecutive Test victories, gave the Lions succour before the tour next year. New Zealand’s next Test is against the Lions on 24 June in the first of three and if they remain comfortable favourites to win the series, Ireland showed in two matches against them that they can crack under pressure.

Related: Ireland clinch first ever win over All Blacks to end New Zealand’s record streak

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2016/dec/04/autumn-internationals-new-zealand-lions-six-nations

Nov 28

Rugby union autumn internationals: talking points from the latest action

Ireland’s latest bruising win shows they are the real deal, England’s set-piece strength will be key against Australia, and New Zealand are human after all

When Ireland beat New Zealand on 5 November, and the All Blacks returned the favour two weeks later in Dublin, there was a sense that the two best teams in the world were slugging it out. But in that second game, Ireland were not just beaten, but beaten up, left bruised and bloodied by the brutal All Blacks. They were forced into three early changes, with Johnny Sexton and Robbie Henshaw ruled out of the clash with Australia. Simon Zebo had a knock, and CJ Stander overcame a head injury. On matchday morn, Sean O’Brien joined them with a hip flexor problem, replaced by the eventual man of the match, Josh van der Flier, and the problems did not cease upon kick-off. By half-time, Rob Kearney, Andrew Trimble and Jared Payne (who had started as a risk) were off injured, and impish scrum-half Kieran Marmion was lining up on the right wing, where he ended the game against the All Blacks. Already, injuries had forced the freshman Garry Ringrose out of position to inside centre. Ireland, particularly in the back division, were the walking wounded; by the end of these two games they were shorn of the fly-half, inside and outside centres, full-back, and right wing (as well as two starting openside flankers) who started their autumn campaign in Chicago. And yet, they came through all this to seal a win that made them the first northern hemisphere team since England in 2003 to beat the Springboks, All Blacks and Wallabies in a calendar year. They really do look the real deal. Will Macpherson

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2016/nov/28/rugby-union-autumn-internationals-talking-points-from-the-latest-action

Nov 27

History beckons as Eddie Jones tells England to push harder for No1 status

• England 27-14 Argentina
• Jones: ‘I was excited about playing with 14 men’

One more rose-tinted victory against Australia on Saturday will make this, statistically, the most impressive calendar year in English rugby history. Not once in the professional era have the national side gone unbeaten from January to December and only one other England team, back in 1992, have done so since 1980. Given the class of 92 played a mere six games, Eddie Jones’s squad would have strong claims to be first among equals should it happen.

To continue to prosper with 13 men on the field for almost a quarter of the game on Saturday suggests Jones and his coaches have distilled a rare team spirit. Elliot Daly, the first England back to be sent off at Test level, will forever recall this game with a shudder but several of his team-mates will feel differently. In terms of revealing genuine character and uncovering answers to awkward defensive questions, this was as significant as any of England’s 13 consecutive wins so far.

Related: England and Owen Farrell dig deep to win 14-man battle with Argentina

Related: Eddie Jones sets his sights on Australia after ‘outstanding performance’

Related: Autumn internationals: five talking points after England’s win over Argentina | Paul Rees

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/nov/27/eddie-jones-england-history-beckons-push-harder-no1-status

Nov 27

England crowd warm to Chris Robshaw as he never stops trying | Andy Bull

A year after the then captain and his team were booed at the Rugby World Cup there is respect for his doggedness and not only because of their winning run

Odd little memories stand out crystal clear from the great mêlée of Saturday’s match, which was otherwise one long blur of flying bodies, boots and balls, reset scrums, rolling substitutions, red and yellow cards. One is from 25 minutes in, when Facundo Isa leapt to catch Ben Youngs’ box kick. Isa spilled the ball forward and it landed slap in the lap of Chris Robshaw. He puffed out his cheeks, punted it 30 yards downfield and set off in pursuit. Robshaw galumphed along like a happy labrador chasing a stick on a beach, passing tacklers as if he was dodging promenaders. It was a brilliantly exuberant bit of play and, when it was done, Robshaw of course buried himself neck deep in the nearest ruck.

Related: Autumn internationals: five talking points after England’s win over Argentina | Paul Rees

Related: Battle with Argentina reveals England’s enormous progress | Andy Bull

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2016/nov/27/england-crowd-warm-to-chris-robshaw-never-stops-trying

Nov 26

England 27-14 Argentina: how the players rated at Twickenham

Jonny May produced an inspired display and got through a tremendous amount of work after Eliot Daly’s sending-off, earning himself 8 out of 10

Mike Brown, Full-Back 7/10 If only he’d consummated his performance with the try it deserved. Could have been two, as would have finished the penalty try. Rock solid and metres galore. Great battle with Cordero.

Jonny May, Wing 8/10 England’s best player in our opinion. When his mate went off he had twice the work and did it. Defence remarkable, pace and support lines deadly. Well-deserved try. He’s back. And better.

Related: England and Owen Farrell dig deep to win 14-man battle with Argentina

Related: Battle with Argentina reveals England’s enormous progress | Andy Bull

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/nov/26/england-argentina-how-they-rated-twickenham

Nov 26

Battle with Argentina reveals England’s enormous progress | Andy Bull

Victory over Argentina in a thrilling and brutal encounter was further proof that England have been transformed under the leadership of Eddie Jones

Late on Saturday afternoon a brilliant red sunset settled over south-west London, making a fitting backdrop for a bloody match at Twickenham. It was a game that contained, as Eddie Jones said, more drama than your average EastEnders omnibus. It was bracketed by two red cards, one for Elliot Daly four minutes from the start, another for Enrique Pieretto four minutes from the finish. In between, including all the extra time at the end of the first half, there was an 80-minute melee, which looked, at times, like one of those cartoon bust-ups in which everything is a blur of flying fists and feet. It was a match you would have to watch back even to begin to understand exactly how it all went down.

Related: England and Owen Farrell dig deep to win 14-man battle with Argentina

Related: Eddie Jones sets his sights on Australia after ‘outstanding performance’

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2016/nov/26/england-argentina-twickenham-eddie-jones

Nov 26

Eddie Jones sets his sights on Australia after ‘outstanding performance’

• ‘I am looking forward to the game – the best win of the year is to come’
• England beat Argentina 27-14 despite early Elliot Daly red card

England have the opportunity of emulating their 2003 side by defeating Australia on Saturday to go through the year unbeaten, but Eddie Jones said he was more concerned about putting one over on his former employers than repeating history.

The head coach was in ebullient mood after his side overcame Argentina despite playing all except the opening four minutes of the match at least a man down after the wing Elliot Daly was sent off for a dangerous challenge on the Pumas’ No8 Leonardo Senatore. He will receive a suspension of at least two weeks while the No8 Billy Vunipola faces a longer period out of action after appearing to damage knee ligaments.

Related: England and Owen Farrell dig deep to win 14-man battle with Argentina

Related: England 27-14 Argentina: rugby union international – as it happened

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/nov/26/eddie-jones-australia-outstanding-performance-england-argentina