Category Archive: Argentina Rugby

Argentina Rugby News

Jun 15

Sam Underhill to make England debut in Argentina as Chris Robshaw returns

• Mark Wilson and Tom Curry will make way for the pair in the second Test
• Eddie Jones welcomes back Robshaw from injury for first Test in six months

Ten new caps last weekend for England – but only the one this. Sam Underhill has been picked by Eddie Jones to start the second Test against Argentina at the Estadio Brigadier General Estanislao López. His inexperience, however, is counterbalanced by a rather more familiar proposition on the other flank of England’s scrum, where Chris Robshaw returns from injury to play his first Test in six months.

“It’s great to welcome back Robshaw into the squad,” Jones said. “He has been one of England’s best players over the last two years and he will add a lot of experience and work rate into our back row. It will also be exciting to see Sam make his debut.”

Related: Owen Farrell ruled out of Lions match against Maori with thigh injury

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/15/sam-underhill-england-debut-argentina-chris-robshaw-returns

Jun 09

Eddie Jones poised to call on most England new caps since 1947

England are set to introduce more fresh faces in one game than in any since the war when they meet Argentina in San Juan on Saturday

If Eddie Jones, assessing the situation in the expected cauldron of 25,000 locals raging beneath the Andes, decides to empty his bench – and he usually does – England will blood more new caps in this first Test against Argentina than they have since 1947.

Related: England’s Tom Curry set to be youngest Test debutant since Jonny Wilkinson

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/09/rugby-union-argentina-england-eddie-jones-new-caps

May 07

Rugby World Cup 2019 draw: Argentina promise to light up Japan’s leap into dark

The draw for the 2019 tournament takes place on Wednesday but the prospect of a group of death holds no fears for the Pumas, the world’s ninth-ranked side

Kyoto, where the draw for the 2019 World Cup takes place on Wednesday, is known as Japan’s thousand-year capital. It is unlikely to take that long for a northern hemisphere nation to win the tournament again after England’s success 14 years ago, and for once their southern hemisphere rivals are not hogging the places at the top of the world rankings.

Holding the draw more than two years before the start of the tournament is intended to give the host nation the maximum time to sell tickets. England had even longer for the 2015 World Cup, with the pools all lined up at the end of 2012. When the hosts were grouped with Australia and Wales to ensure that either the 2007 finalists or one of the 2011 semi-finalists would not make the knockout stage, the protest was loud enough for the draw to be put back six months this time. It gave the Six Nations countries a chance to improve their positions in the rankings, although at one point Wales, after defeats by England and France, were on course to slip out of the top eight again; victory over Ireland saved them.

Related: Holding 2023 Rugby World Cup in Ireland would capture hearts and minds | Robert Kitson

Related: Autumn internationals: All Blacks still top but southern powers feel Test fatigue | Paul Rees

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/may/07/rugby-world-cup-2019-draw-argentina-japan

Dec 04

Autumn internationals: All Blacks still top but southern powers feel Test fatigue | Paul Rees

New Zealand remain the yardstick but their flaws feed Lions’ hopes for next summer even though the settled order of the Six Nations is in need of a shake-up

The All Blacks remain at the top of the world rankings by a comfortable margin, but their defeat by Ireland in Chicago, which ended a record of 18 consecutive Test victories, gave the Lions succour before the tour next year. New Zealand’s next Test is against the Lions on 24 June in the first of three and if they remain comfortable favourites to win the series, Ireland showed in two matches against them that they can crack under pressure.

Related: Ireland clinch first ever win over All Blacks to end New Zealand’s record streak

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2016/dec/04/autumn-internationals-new-zealand-lions-six-nations

Nov 28

Rugby union autumn internationals: talking points from the latest action

Ireland’s latest bruising win shows they are the real deal, England’s set-piece strength will be key against Australia, and New Zealand are human after all

When Ireland beat New Zealand on 5 November, and the All Blacks returned the favour two weeks later in Dublin, there was a sense that the two best teams in the world were slugging it out. But in that second game, Ireland were not just beaten, but beaten up, left bruised and bloodied by the brutal All Blacks. They were forced into three early changes, with Johnny Sexton and Robbie Henshaw ruled out of the clash with Australia. Simon Zebo had a knock, and CJ Stander overcame a head injury. On matchday morn, Sean O’Brien joined them with a hip flexor problem, replaced by the eventual man of the match, Josh van der Flier, and the problems did not cease upon kick-off. By half-time, Rob Kearney, Andrew Trimble and Jared Payne (who had started as a risk) were off injured, and impish scrum-half Kieran Marmion was lining up on the right wing, where he ended the game against the All Blacks. Already, injuries had forced the freshman Garry Ringrose out of position to inside centre. Ireland, particularly in the back division, were the walking wounded; by the end of these two games they were shorn of the fly-half, inside and outside centres, full-back, and right wing (as well as two starting openside flankers) who started their autumn campaign in Chicago. And yet, they came through all this to seal a win that made them the first northern hemisphere team since England in 2003 to beat the Springboks, All Blacks and Wallabies in a calendar year. They really do look the real deal. Will Macpherson

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2016/nov/28/rugby-union-autumn-internationals-talking-points-from-the-latest-action

Nov 27

History beckons as Eddie Jones tells England to push harder for No1 status

• England 27-14 Argentina
• Jones: ‘I was excited about playing with 14 men’

One more rose-tinted victory against Australia on Saturday will make this, statistically, the most impressive calendar year in English rugby history. Not once in the professional era have the national side gone unbeaten from January to December and only one other England team, back in 1992, have done so since 1980. Given the class of 92 played a mere six games, Eddie Jones’s squad would have strong claims to be first among equals should it happen.

To continue to prosper with 13 men on the field for almost a quarter of the game on Saturday suggests Jones and his coaches have distilled a rare team spirit. Elliot Daly, the first England back to be sent off at Test level, will forever recall this game with a shudder but several of his team-mates will feel differently. In terms of revealing genuine character and uncovering answers to awkward defensive questions, this was as significant as any of England’s 13 consecutive wins so far.

Related: England and Owen Farrell dig deep to win 14-man battle with Argentina

Related: Eddie Jones sets his sights on Australia after ‘outstanding performance’

Related: Autumn internationals: five talking points after England’s win over Argentina | Paul Rees

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/nov/27/eddie-jones-england-history-beckons-push-harder-no1-status

Nov 27

England crowd warm to Chris Robshaw as he never stops trying | Andy Bull

A year after the then captain and his team were booed at the Rugby World Cup there is respect for his doggedness and not only because of their winning run

Odd little memories stand out crystal clear from the great mêlée of Saturday’s match, which was otherwise one long blur of flying bodies, boots and balls, reset scrums, rolling substitutions, red and yellow cards. One is from 25 minutes in, when Facundo Isa leapt to catch Ben Youngs’ box kick. Isa spilled the ball forward and it landed slap in the lap of Chris Robshaw. He puffed out his cheeks, punted it 30 yards downfield and set off in pursuit. Robshaw galumphed along like a happy labrador chasing a stick on a beach, passing tacklers as if he was dodging promenaders. It was a brilliantly exuberant bit of play and, when it was done, Robshaw of course buried himself neck deep in the nearest ruck.

Related: Autumn internationals: five talking points after England’s win over Argentina | Paul Rees

Related: Battle with Argentina reveals England’s enormous progress | Andy Bull

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2016/nov/27/england-crowd-warm-to-chris-robshaw-never-stops-trying

Nov 26

England 27-14 Argentina: how the players rated at Twickenham

Jonny May produced an inspired display and got through a tremendous amount of work after Eliot Daly’s sending-off, earning himself 8 out of 10

Mike Brown, Full-Back 7/10 If only he’d consummated his performance with the try it deserved. Could have been two, as would have finished the penalty try. Rock solid and metres galore. Great battle with Cordero.

Jonny May, Wing 8/10 England’s best player in our opinion. When his mate went off he had twice the work and did it. Defence remarkable, pace and support lines deadly. Well-deserved try. He’s back. And better.

Related: England and Owen Farrell dig deep to win 14-man battle with Argentina

Related: Battle with Argentina reveals England’s enormous progress | Andy Bull

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/nov/26/england-argentina-how-they-rated-twickenham

Nov 26

Battle with Argentina reveals England’s enormous progress | Andy Bull

Victory over Argentina in a thrilling and brutal encounter was further proof that England have been transformed under the leadership of Eddie Jones

Late on Saturday afternoon a brilliant red sunset settled over south-west London, making a fitting backdrop for a bloody match at Twickenham. It was a game that contained, as Eddie Jones said, more drama than your average EastEnders omnibus. It was bracketed by two red cards, one for Elliot Daly four minutes from the start, another for Enrique Pieretto four minutes from the finish. In between, including all the extra time at the end of the first half, there was an 80-minute melee, which looked, at times, like one of those cartoon bust-ups in which everything is a blur of flying fists and feet. It was a match you would have to watch back even to begin to understand exactly how it all went down.

Related: England and Owen Farrell dig deep to win 14-man battle with Argentina

Related: Eddie Jones sets his sights on Australia after ‘outstanding performance’

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2016/nov/26/england-argentina-twickenham-eddie-jones

Nov 26

Eddie Jones sets his sights on Australia after ‘outstanding performance’

• ‘I am looking forward to the game – the best win of the year is to come’
• England beat Argentina 27-14 despite early Elliot Daly red card

England have the opportunity of emulating their 2003 side by defeating Australia on Saturday to go through the year unbeaten, but Eddie Jones said he was more concerned about putting one over on his former employers than repeating history.

The head coach was in ebullient mood after his side overcame Argentina despite playing all except the opening four minutes of the match at least a man down after the wing Elliot Daly was sent off for a dangerous challenge on the Pumas’ No8 Leonardo Senatore. He will receive a suspension of at least two weeks while the No8 Billy Vunipola faces a longer period out of action after appearing to damage knee ligaments.

Related: England and Owen Farrell dig deep to win 14-man battle with Argentina

Related: England 27-14 Argentina: rugby union international – as it happened

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/nov/26/eddie-jones-australia-outstanding-performance-england-argentina