Category Archive: England National Cricket

England National Cricket Team News

Aug 20

Deep-thinking Stuart Broad in no mood to ease up despite mismatch of a series | Ali Martin

England’s second-highest wicket-taker will politely suggest he needs no additional rest before the Ashes, despite the evisceration of West Indies suggesting his side could consider all options

Stuart Broad will be reminding the England management that there are two months to rest before the Ashes, with the fast bowler, fresh from becoming their second highest wicket-taker in Tests, in no mood to miss the seemingly easy pickings on offer against West Indies.

In what is already shaping up to be a mismatched series after the three-day (and night) evisceration of the tourists at Edgbaston, the temptation may be to bring the fit-again Chris Woakes back for the second Test at Headingley starting on Friday, with one eye on the winter.

Related: England overwhelm West Indies as Stuart Broad passes Ian Botham’s mark

Related: Edgbaston cakewalk and Murray’s glory highlight magic of moonlit sport | Paul MacInnes

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/20/stuart-broad-test-mismatch-england-west-indies

Aug 20

Edgbaston cakewalk and Murray’s glory highlight magic of moonlit sport | Paul MacInnes

As football, cricket and tennis fans have all discovered, there is a unique and seductive allure to night-time competition

One of the great things about being a fan of sport is the licence to rail against modernity. Complain about the intranet at work and no doubt, in time, you will be disciplined. Complain about sprinters pulling faces for the cameras on the start line and millions will be with you.

This antediluvian attitude ought to make the positive noises which greeted the day-night Test involving England and the West Indies all the more surprising. Rather than bemoan the creation of an entirely new meal break, coined ‘trunch’ by my colleague Andy Bull, the Edgbaston crowd were bang into it. Perhaps even a bit more than they were the cricket. The same went for people watching Arsenal’s victory over Leicester at the Emirates Stadium to launch another Premier League season on the Friday before last.

Related: England overwhelm West Indies as Stuart Broad passes Ian Botham’s mark

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2017/aug/20/edgbaston-andy-murray-magic-moonlit-sport-night-football-cricket-tennis

Aug 18

Alastair Cook masterclass was inspiring, says Ashes hopeful Dawid Malan

• England newcomer hails Cook’s ‘fantastic’ double ton v West Indies
• Malan admits he needed half-century after mixed start to Test career

Dawid Malan conceded he did not look like scoring a run in the series against South Africa and so, after registering his maiden half-century in Test cricket, albeit against a less threatening West Indian attack, the England No5 is starting to feel more at home.

Related: Alastair Cook’s mighty 243 puts England firmly in control against West Indies

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/18/cricket-england-west-indies-dawid-malan-alastair-cook

Aug 18

Alastair Cook’s mighty 243 puts England firmly in control against West Indies

• First Test, day two: England 514-8 dec; West indies 44-1
• Cook reaches his fourth double Test century

The great players tend to play in the same way whatever the situation. Hence anyone meandering into Edgbaston on Friday afternoon when the electronic scoreboard was dutifully satisfying some sponsor rather than showing the relevant numbers would have had no real idea about the state of the game.

Related: England v West Indies: day-night Test at Edgbaston, day two – as it happened

Related: Alastair Cook masterclass was inspiring, says Ashes hopeful Dawid Malan

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/18/england-west-indies-first-day-night-test-edgbaston-day-two-report

Aug 17

Alastair Cook: ‘Genius’ Joe Root is the best I’ve ever played with

• Former skipper lauds current captain after 248-run stand
• Hosts dominate first day-night Test in England against West Indies

Joe Root was lauded a genius by Alastair Cook and the best England batsman he has batted alongside after dominant centuries from the pair lit up the country’s first taste of day-night Test cricket and left West Indies already looking bereft.

Cook batted throughout the day for his 31st Test hundred and will resume the second afternoon unbeaten on 153, with the total already 348 for three thanks to the third-wicket stand of 248 with his successor as captain, Root, who struck himself struck a frictionless 136.

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/17/england-west-indies-first-day-night-test-edgbaston-alastair-cook-joe-root

Aug 16

Batting the big question mark for West Indies to make series competitive | Vic Marks

They will have the fastest bowlers on show at Edgbaston, but a new batting star will need to emerge if the tourists are going to find the runs to put England under pressure

With uncertainty comes excitement. So it must be a good thing that we don’t quite know what to expect at Edgbaston over the next few days. We do know that the ball is pink, that ticket sales are good and that it might be a good idea to bring a jumper (and maybe a blanket and a balaclava for the final session, which will probably end around 9.30pm every evening). Even better; get an invitation to a swish, warm hospitality box.

We are less sure about how the pink ball will behave or how good this West Indies team will be. There has been a rapprochement of sorts between the players and the West Indies board, though that is not obvious from the Test squad selected. While the youngsters in the touring party prepare to do battle with England’s finest in Birmingham (the leg-spinner, Devendra Bishoo, is the only man over 30 in the tour party), the more familiar names are participating in the Caribbean Premier League. Understandably the older players are pondering their pensions.

Related: Pink balls and a witching hour: what to expect at England’s first day-night Test | Will Macpherson

Related: Mark Stoneman’s debut against West Indies offers chance of Ashes place

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2017/aug/16/england-west-indies-edgbaston-test-series-batting

Aug 15

Mark Stoneman’s debut against West Indies offers chance of Ashes place

• Stoneman will be Alastair Cook’s 15th England opening partner
• West Indies head coach Stuart Law urges his team to answer critics

Mark Stoneman feels his Test debut against West Indies under lights this Thursday is justification for his winter move from Durham to Surrey as he prepares to become the latest batsman to try to crack the puzzle that is being Alastair Cook’s opening partner.

At 30 years of age Stoneman will become the oldest specialist batsman to be handed a first England cap this century, and the hope from the selectors now is that this seasoned left-hander’s additional experience comes off in the three-match Investec series and ends the seemingly perpetual search to fill the gap left by the retirement of Andrew Strauss in 2012.

Related: Day-night Test is step into the unknown for England, says Stuart Broad

(March 1, 2006) Andrew Strauss

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/15/mark-stoneman-west-indies-first-test-england

Aug 15

Edgbaston does its homework before England’s first day-night Test | The Spin

West Indies are in town from Thursday, when a pink Dukes ball and inappropriate break names are the least of the adjustments to the staple Test match fare

The first of many questions that executives at Edgbaston had to ask as they commenced preparations for England’s first ever day-night Test was: what do you call the breaks? Standard, daytime Tests have their lunch break at, well, lunchtime, and their tea break at, give or take, tea time. A 2pm start distorts the timetable and, while 4pm can be referred to in many ways, if you are calling it lunchtime something has gone badly wrong with your day.

In Adelaide, where Australia played day-night Test matches against New Zealand in 2015 and South Africa the following year, and where England will appear in another this December, the breaks were switched, with the first becoming shorter and known as tea, and the second – coming, as it does, at approximately dinnertime – stretching longer and renamed dinner.

Related: Day-night Test is step into the unknown for England, says Stuart Broad

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/15/the-spin-edgbaston-england-first-day-night-test-west-indies

Aug 14

Day-night Test is step into the unknown for England, says Stuart Broad

• West Indies come to Edgbaston with the experience of one such Test
• ‘I just don’t know what to expect,’ says bowler before pink-ball clash

Stuart Broad has described England’s maiden day-night Test match this week as a “step into the unknown” and one that could prove an early leveller against a West Indies side they are otherwise expected to make light work of in preparation for the Ashes.

Steel bands and a fake beach are just two of a number of Caribbean add-ons set to be in place at Edgbaston from 2pm on Thursday as, with a pink Dukes ball in hand and under floodlights in the evening session, the two teams get their three-match Investec series under way and Joe Root’s side look to continue their form from the 3-1 win over South Africa.

Related: India pair Ravi Ashwin and Cheteshwar Pujara set to play county cricket

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/14/day-night-test-step-unknown-england-stuart-broad-cricket-west-indies

Aug 13

The scariest Test England ever played: terror at the hands of West Indies

In 1986, England went to the Caribbean fancying their chances. After Patrick Patterson inspired a brutal first Test thrashing, a 5-0 defeat was inevitable

Graham Gooch’s specialist subject is West Indian pace bowling. He is probably the leading authority on what it was like to face the four horsemen of the apocalypse. From 1980 to 1995, when the West Indies dominated Test cricket, nobody scored more runs against them than Gooch, and only Allan Border faced more deliveries. Gooch also played the greatest innings of all time, 154 not out at Headingley in 1991. It is worth listening, then, when he says that only once in his career did he feel unsafe: Friday 21 February 1986 at Sabina Park, the first day of a much anticipated series, and the start of a weekend festival of chin music.

England had a bespoke batting line-up full of men who didn’t understand the concept of pain, yet they were still brutalised inside three days. It was horror bingo: they had to contend with a corrugated pitch, a low sightscreen, an umpire with a laissez-faire attitude towards bouncers and the volcanic pace of the debutant Patrick Patterson. “It was the first time,” said Gooch, “I’d ever really got the whiff of danger in the nostrils.”

Related: Graham Gooch’s finest hour: when the runs flowed in the face of fear | Mike Selvey

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/13/scariest-test-england-ever-played-terror-west-indies-cricket-1986-patrick-patterson

Aug 12

Selectors hope Mason Crane can conquer English history on step into the unknown | Vic Marks

The 20-year-old Sussex leg-spinner is unlikely to play in the day-night Test against West Indies at Edgbaston but he could soon buck a troublesome trend

It seems we have some dewy-eyed romantics as selectors. From Hampshire they have plucked the young wrist-spinner, Mason Crane, whose bowling average is twice his age. A fresh-faced novice of 20 is on the verge of playing Test cricket after 25 first-class games.

It is an eye-catching selection and a heartwarming story and – who knows – might have a happy ending. Whether Crane actually plays in Birmingham against West Indies is debatable. This is England’s first ever day-night Test with the devious pink ball, which sometimes get up to tricks when the sun goes down. During the twilight hour it is the seamers who usually prevail. So Crane may not make the final XI.

Related: Heather Knight: ‘I was panicked. I thought I’d lost the World Cup’

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2017/aug/12/mason-crane-england-legspin-west-indies-test-day-night

Aug 09

Haseeb Hameed happy to be in runs but not counting on England return

• Opener back in international frame after unbeaten 77 for Lancashire
• Hameed hopes poor run with bat will make him better player

Two days of steady rain prevented Haseeb Hameed adding to the composed, unbeaten 77 he made against Hampshire but the Lancashire opener is determined to focus on what he can learn from his struggle of a summer, rather than on an immediate England recall. This was, after all, his first half-century in 21 innings dating back to November.

“You hear a lot of successful sportspeople say that these tough times make you a better cricketer and a better person, and I feel like I have developed a lot not only as a player but as a person as well this season,” said the 20-year-old. who was forced to fly home from England’s tour of India in November, after an impressive start, with a broken finger. “Hopefully I can look back on the last few months and say ‘you know what, this is what made me a better player’ than if things had just gone my way from the word go.”

Related: Women’s KSL returns hoping to reap dividends of World Cup glory

Related: Moeen Ali considers himself a batsman first despite summer of spin success

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/09/haseeb-hameed-england-return-lancashire

Aug 08

Moeen Ali considers himself a batsman first despite summer of spin success

• Worcestershire all-rounder took 25 wickets in series with South Africa
• ‘I’d like to see how I go [in India] now’

Trevor Bayliss may have finally conceded that Moeen Ali is England’s No1 spinner following a profitable spell of kidology this summer, but despite the 25 wickets claimed by his off-breaks in the series win over South Africa, Moeen will continue to consider himself a batsman first.

Moeen is riding high at present. A match-winning showing at Old Trafford of seven wickets with the ball and a momentum-shifting unbeaten 75 with the bat capped an impactful performance throughout the 3-1 series victory and once again underlined the 30-year-old’s value to the captain Joe Root and head coach Bayliss as one of three talented all-rounders.

Related: Moeen Ali sees off South Africa with five wickets as England win final Test

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/08/moeen-ali-batsman-spin-success-south-africa-england-cricket

Aug 08

Joe Root’s form and leadership reassure but England top order still an issue | Vic Marks

Two batting places are up for grabs in Test series against West Indies as selectors search for settled line-up in time for the Ashes in Australia

It is quite an achievement to beat South Africa for the first time in two decades in this country with what was to all intents a nine-man side. England were dependent on their old guard for victory while those seeking to establish a place in the side were unable to make telling contributions.

The combination of Liam Dawson, Gary Ballance and Dawid Malan mustered 138 runs in 12 innings in this series – though one should not discount Dawson’s five wickets at Lord’s. At the top of the order Keaton Jennings scored 127 runs in eight visits to the crease – and he was the beneficiary of several dropped catches.

Related: Joe Root believes England’s Test series win could be the start of something

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2017/aug/08/england-south-africa-joe-root-west-indies-australia-ashes-tour

Aug 07

Joe Root believes England’s Test series win could be the start of something

• ‘It was very important to have got off to a good start this summer’
• Root insists it will take time to develop and become more consistent

Joe Root shared the hope that his first Test series win as England captain could well be the start of something after the all-round wizardry of Moeen Ali wrapped up a 177-run victory over South Africa and completed a compelling 3-1 scoreline against the tourists.

Moeen, in spinning Root’s side to victory on the fourth day at Old Trafford with figures of five for 69, completed a rare statistical double, becoming only the second England cricketer since Ian Botham in the 1981 and 1985 Ashes to claim 25 wickets and score 250-plus runs in a series.

Related: Moeen Ali sees off South Africa with five wickets as England win final Test

Related: Moeen Ali underlines his No1 status by spinning South Africa to defeat

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/07/joe-root-england-south-africa-

Aug 07

Moeen Ali underlines his No1 status by spinning South Africa to defeat

With his five-wicket burst, Moeen became the second England cricketer after Ian Botham to take 25 wickets and score more than 250 runs in a four-Test series

It had to be Moeen Ali, the man of Joe Root’s first summer as Test captain, who would pick the lock that sent England hurtling towards a 177-run win at Old Trafford and what was their first series win over South Africa at home in 19 years. After his 10 wickets and 96 runs at Lord’s came his hat-trick at The Oval, before the audacious counterattack with the bat here on the third evening was followed by figures of five for 69 in England’s fourth-innings surge.

The shining smile that resides above the luxuriant beard has been an enduring image throughout this 3-1 defence of the Basil D’Oliviera Trophy.

Related: Moeen Ali sees off South Africa with five wickets as England win final Test

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2017/aug/07/moeen-ali-england-south-africa-fourth-test

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