Sean Ingle

Author's details

Name: Sean Ingle
Date registered: October 2, 2014
URL: http://www.theguardian.com/football/newcastleunited

Latest posts

  1. Team GB athletes unlikely to receive reallocated medals this summer — June 21, 2017
  2. Sporting scandals will sail on until athletes are free to rock the boat | Sean Ingle — June 18, 2017
  3. UK Sport ignored red lights about problems at British Cycling — June 15, 2017
  4. Sport 2.0: crumbling traditions create a whole new ballgame | Sean Ingle — June 13, 2017
  5. Kell Brook was brave, not a coward, for realising he was hurt | Sean Ingle — May 29, 2017

Author's posts listings

Jun 21

Team GB athletes unlikely to receive reallocated medals this summer

• Goldie Sayers says she will be ‘gutted’ not to get 2008 Olympic bronze
• Legal challenges jeopardise London ceremony in August

Goldie Sayers will be “gutted” if she is one of the British athletes robbed of the chance to receive medals denied to them by drug cheats at a special ceremony at the world championships in London in August.

Organisers have offered to host extra ceremonies for Sayers and other British athletes, including Jessica Ennis-Hill, Jo Pavey and Kelly Sotherton, who also missed out on medals at Olympic Games and world championships owing to athletes subsequently found to have taken performance-enhancing drugs. Yet because of legal challenges it appears unlikely the reallocation of medals will happen before 10 August, when the ceremonies are due to take place.

Related: Jessica Ennis-Hill and Jo Pavey in line for special London medals ceremony

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/21/team-gb-athletics-medals-drug-cheats-2008-olympics

Jun 18

Sporting scandals will sail on until athletes are free to rock the boat | Sean Ingle

With allegations surfacing about Britain’s bobsleigh and canoeing setups, UK Sport faces an urgent need to empower its athletes to blow the whistle

A couple of days ago I asked a UK Sport insider why more athletes do not go public with their concerns. “Put yourself in their shoes,” came the reply. “One path is potentially well rewarded. And then there’s another that comes after speaking out. If you are a rational person, do you want to travel down the road of a Brian Cookson or a Jess Varnish? There is a massive disincentive to rock the boat.”

One can see their point. Cookson, having enjoyed a long career in sports administration, is now president of the UCI, earning £235,000 a year. Varnish, having spoken out about the problems in British Cycling – and having been largely vindicated – finds herself marginalised and ostracised. At 26 she also knows her career in elite sport is probably over. What would you do?

Related: British Bobsleigh team told: keep quiet about bullying or miss Olympics

Related: Police investigate suspended GB Canoeing coach after child grooming and sexual assault claims

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/18/athletes-british-bobsleigh-canoeing-uk-sport

Jun 15

UK Sport ignored red lights about problems at British Cycling

It has been toned down from the draft but Annmarie Phelps’s review of British Cycling shows how UK Sport either missed, or wilfully ignored, numerous attempts to tackle problems

UK Sport has long prided itself on a high-performance system that it insists is “the envy of the world”. Yet the way it deflected and muzzled criticism of how it had failed to spot deep-rooted problems at British Cycling on Wednesday suggested world-class levels of obfuscation, too.

It had been expected Annmarie Phelps’s independent review into the climate and culture of British Cycling, which appeared after 14 months in utero, would be slimmer and more watered down than a draft version of the report leaked in March. And so it was.

Related: British Cycling: Annamarie Phelps denies ‘whitewash’ over diluted report

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/15/uk-sport-red-lights-british-cycling-annmarie-phelps-review

Jun 13

Sport 2.0: crumbling traditions create a whole new ballgame | Sean Ingle

In the first of our series examining the future of sport, we look at the major challenges facing the established powers: from doping and corruption to falling viewing figures

The dawn of London 2012. Danny Boyle’s opening ceremony has eviscerated any lingering public cynicism, while Team GB’s arrival and the Arctic Monkeys’ cover of the Beatles’ Come Together has thrust everyone inside the Olympic Stadium off their feet. Now, as the intense whoops and waves of noise finally subside, Sebastian Coe, the organiser of the Games, stands up to urge the millions watching to appreciate the unique power of sport.

“There is a truth to sport,” he insists. “A purity, a drama, an intensity – a spirit that makes it irresistible to take part in, and irresistible to watch.”

Related: Golf fights old perceptions and drop in players to attract new audience | Ewan Murray

Related: IOC’s Rio ban failure exposed by deepening of Russian doping scandal

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/13/traditional-sports-crisis-sport-2-0

May 29

Kell Brook was brave, not a coward, for realising he was hurt | Sean Ingle

Those who shout loudest are best advised to engage their brain before their mouth, as in the case of those who called him a quitter against Errol Spence

It took until Sunday morning for a CT scan to confirm that Kell Brook’s left eye socket was fractured and for him to explain what it was like trying to stand toe-to-toe with the world’s best welterweight while suffering double vision and a ring that appeared to be moving. But, really, we knew it was a bad one long before then.

It wasn’t just that the stabbing accuracy of Errol Spence Jr’s punches had blown Brook’s eye up like a marshmallow. It was also that, as the fight entered the championship rounds, he began rapidly blinking and pawing at his eye with his glove, as if trying to swat away a wasp from under his eyelid.

Related: Errol Spence Jr stops Kell Brook in 11th round to win IBF welterweight title

Related: Eduard Gutknecht undergoes surgery after George Groves fight

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2017/may/29/kell-brook-eye-injury-dangers-boxing

May 21

Mayweather-McGregor would be mismatch, so why is everyone talking about it? | Sean Ingle

A massive cheque with plenty of noughts on end could lure Floyd Mayweather back to ring in what would surely be one of the most one-sided bouts of his career

Some scientists and Silicon Valley smarts increasingly believe that nothing we experience is real, and that life is just a giant computer game created by a far more sophisticated super‑intelligence. This theory even has a name: simulation hypothesis – although, disappointingly, it has nothing to say about whether Cristiano Ronaldo might stay on his feet more in a parallel universe.

If these folk are right, then perhaps we should also start asking whether our silicon overlords have got bored with Earth: The Game and decided to tweak the programme radically. And maybe having shown just how gullible we are when swallowing any old political nonsense, they want to do the same with sport.

Related: The forgotten story of … Muhammad Ali v Antonio Inoki | Andy Bull

Related: Andre Dirrell title fight ends with uncle punching opponent and fleeing ring

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/may/21/floyd-mayweather-conor-mcgregor-superfight

Apr 23

Tennis must not allow Ilie Nastase to volley away his latest indiscretions | Sean Ingle

The Romanian has a long history of behaving badly and the game’s authorities have done it a disservice by not challenging him with sufficient force

To one eyewitness, Ilie Nastase behaved in a “vile, disgusting and deplorable manner to every member of the British team”. Another talked of “very base and vulgar language” with “gross finger gestures” to the crowd. Some even wondered whether the match between Romania and Great Britain should be called off. Sounds familiar, doesn’t it? Two days ago familiar, perhaps? Only these comments weren’t about this weekend’s Federation Cup tie – but came from the British team following a Davis Cup match against Nastase’s Romania in 1978.

So we shouldn’t be surprised that Nastase called Johanna Konta“a fucking bitch”, made offensive remarks about Serena Williams’ unborn child, or leched over the British team captain, Anne Keothavong, before asking for her room number. Sneering, leering, loud, louche: such adjectives should define Nastase as much as those used to describe his remarkable shot-making on court.

Related: Ilie Nastase must be evicted from tennis for his behaviour at Fed Cup | Kevin Mitchell

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2017/apr/23/ilie-nastase-outburst-federation-cup-johanna-konta-gb