Sean Ingle at Wimbledon

Author's details

Name: Sean Ingle at Wimbledon
Date registered: July 2, 2015
URL: http://www.theguardian.com/sport/tennis

Latest posts

  1. Roger Federer stands tallest of all as Wimbledon’s history man | Sean Ingle — July 16, 2017
  2. Garbiñe Muguruza: ‘I was nervous but kept fighting’ for Wimbledon title — July 15, 2017
  3. Garbiñe Muguruza banishes nerves to write her name in Wimbledon gold | Sean Ingle — July 15, 2017
  4. Wimbledon crowd can expect more nailbiting moments from Johanna Konta — July 13, 2017
  5. Wimbledon diary: men’s last four the bigger draw despite Andy Murray exit — July 12, 2017

Author's posts listings

Jul 16

Roger Federer stands tallest of all as Wimbledon’s history man | Sean Ingle

With a record eighth title at All England Club and a 19th grand slam success, achieved without losing a set, the 35-year-old remains a class apart

Roger Federer cemented his reputation as the greatest player to grace his sport by lifting a record eighth Wimbledon title with a one-sided victory over Marin Cilic, whose thin hopes of an upset were popped by a blister that troubled his movement and tormented his mind.

It was an afternoon of sustained emotions but scant drama. Federer, a great Wimbledon favourite since winning his first title in 2003, raced through the match in one hour and 41 minutes and dropped only eight games in a 6-3, 6-1, 6-4 procession.

Related: Roger Federer already planning Wimbledon return after record eighth title

Related: Marin Cilic’s tears are the memorable image of one-sided Wimbledon final | Martha Kelner

Related: Jamie Murray and Martina Hingis win Wimbledon mixed doubles crown

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jul/17/roger-federer-wimbledon-record-class-apart

Jul 15

Garbiñe Muguruza: ‘I was nervous but kept fighting’ for Wimbledon title

• Muguruza: ‘I was very nervous and tense. I wanted it to go my way’
• Venus Williams: ‘She just dug in there. I’ve had a great two weeks’

A delighted Garbiñe Muguruza hailed her fighting spirit after coming through a tricky opening set against Venus Williams before running away with the second to claim her first Wimbledon women’s singles title.

The 23-year-old Spaniard –runner-up against Williams’s sister Serena in 2015 – faced two set points at 4-5 in the first set but confidently saw them out before taking nine games running to come through 7-5, 6-0 in 77 minutes. Afterwards she confessed that, though she had been nervous, she was always confident of a triumph.

Related: Garbiñe Muguruza crowned Wimbledon champion after beating Venus Williams

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jul/15/garbine-muguruza-wimbledon-champion-nervous-but-kept-fighting-venus-williams-tennis

Jul 15

Garbiñe Muguruza banishes nerves to write her name in Wimbledon gold | Sean Ingle

She made too many unforced errors early on against Venus Williams but once ahead Garbiñe Muguruza found her rhythm to add her name to the champions’ board that has been inspiring her

Throughout this Wimbledon Garbiñe Muguruza has paused at the Centre Court honours board, immersing herself in the legendary names of the past before willing herself to join them. On Saturday afternoon she got her chance – and, with a performance of stunning clarity and brutal unsentimentality, she took it. Now, following her 7-5, 6-0 victory over the five-times champion Venus Williams, her name, too, is etched in gold.

The 23-year-old Spaniard’s talent has never been in question but she has always blown hotter and colder than most. This fortnight, however, those tennis winds must have come from the Sahara. Throughout the tournament she dropped only one set, and had her serve broken just four times. It was quite a transformation given she had lost in the early rounds at Birmingham and Eastbourne last month.

Related: Garbiñe Muguruza crowned Wimbledon champion after beating Venus Williams

Related: Garbiñe Muguruza beats top seed Angelique Kerber in sidelined thriller

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jul/15/garbine-muguruza-beats-nerves-wimbledon-surface-weird

Jul 13

Wimbledon crowd can expect more nailbiting moments from Johanna Konta

The British No1 bows to the court craft of Venus Williams but her exit cannot dampen the enthusiasm of her fans on Centre Court or the Hill

Throughout the 73 minutes that constituted Johanna Konta’s biggest match of her late-flowering career her mother, Gabrielle, paced the grounds of the All-England Club, biting at her nails and taking furtive glances at the big screen. A fulsome Centre Court crowd, along with thousands more scrunched tight on the Hill to watch her semi-final against Venus Williams, knew precisely the anguish she was going through.

They willed the British No1’s piledrivers home, gasping and rasping every time a winner pinged off her racket. But, as Williams’ immense class and experience began fully to emerge, hope gave way to the painful realisation that this would not be Konta’s year. The 6-4, 6-2 score was harsh but no one doubted that the better player had won – and won well.

Related: Venus Williams into Wimbledon final with smooth defeat of Johanna Konta

Related: Beaten Johanna Konta says Wimbledon run proves she can win grand slam titles

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jul/13/wimbledon-crowd-johanna-konta

Jul 12

Wimbledon diary: men’s last four the bigger draw despite Andy Murray exit

Tickets for Johanna Konta’s match with Venus Williams can be picked up for £850 while the cheapest seats to see Sam Querrey v Marin Cilic are £3,400

When Andy Murray hobbled out of Wimbledon, it left Johanna Konta as the only remaining British player in the women’s or men’s singles draw. The 26-year-old has been a staple of the nation’s front and back pages as she has crashed into the mainstream. So it was somewhat of a surprise to find the cheapest tickets for the women’s semi‑finals – of which Konta’s match against Venus Williams is the biggest attraction – were going for £850 each on the secondary market on Wednesday afternoon, while the cheapest men’s semi-finals were four times that at £3,400. And that was after Murray was knocked out. Clearly the Federer effect still lingers.

Related: Johanna Konta’s story is about far more than merely accents and flags | Barney Ronay

Related: Wimbledon: Marin Cilic beats Gilles Müller to set up Querrey semi-final

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jul/12/wimbledon-diary-big-money-mens-semi-finals

Jul 12

Roger Federer beats Milos Raonic in straight sets to reach Wimbledon semis

• Roger Federer wins 6-4, 6-2, 7-6 (4)
• Federer to play Tomas Berdych in semi-final

Shortly after Roger Federer had defused Milos Raonic’s power game with a deftness and elan that ranked alongside many of his great Wimbledon performances he was asked whether he could explain how, aged 35 years and 342 days, he was playing so well. His response was startling. “This year I’m just a normal tennis player again.”

Normal was not an adjective anyone who watched Federer’s 6-4, 6-2, 7-6 (4) victory in his 100th match at the All England club would have chosen. The No3 seed was sensational, winning 90% of his first-serve points, thumping 46 winners to nine unforced errors, and moving like a panther around the court.

Related: Novak Djokovic pulls out of Wimbledon quarter-final with elbow injury

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jul/12/roger-federer-wimbledon-milos-raoinic-match-report

Jul 08

Roger Federer finds stubborn Mischa Zverev not to be sneezed at

• Federer shrugs off cold to win 7-6 (3), 6-4, 6-4 on Centre Court
• No3 seed to play Grigor Dimitrov in the fourth round of Wimbledon

It might be sacrilege to say it around these parts, but Roger Federer is not yet humming at his imperious best. There have been ripples of genius, not sustained waves. Flat spots as well as staggering shots. Even so, the No3 seed was plenty good enough to fend off Mischa Zverev’s stubborn challenge in three tight sets as the evening closed in – now, for the good of his hopes of winning an eighth Wimbledon title he just needs to see off the persistent cold that has plagued him all week.

“I’m definitely feeling better,” he said. “I feel 50% better than I did on Thursday and I’m happy things are progressing well I hope that on Monday I’m back to 100%.”

Related: Novak Djokovic’s passion and precision return in win over Ernests Gulbis

Related: Angelique Kerber survives Shelby Rogers scare to advance at Wimbledon

Related: Sam Querrey ousts Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in minutes while Monfils exits in epic

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jul/08/roger-federer-beats-mischa-zverev-wimbledon

Jul 05

Rafa Nadal offers ominous signs of form in straight sets win over Donald Young | Sean Ingle

The Spaniard has not reached the last eight at Wimbledon since 2011 but after winning at Roland Garros, he looks a real contender for the title

It has been many years since Wimbledon has witnessed Rafael Nadal prowling the baseline so confidently – those narrow eyes glaring across the net as if his opponent just dared to insult his mother, that laser-like focus matched only by the staggering accuracy of his groundstrokes. But the Spaniard, who is seeded four this year, has every reason to be confident judging by his enthralling and ultimately emphatic 6-4, 6-2, 7-5 win over Donald Young.

Before the match pictures had circulated on social media of Nadal struggling to use a self-service checkout machine while buying a six-pack of Diet Coke in Wimbledon village. But, despite appearances to the contrary in recent years, he still knows his way around a grass court as he showed by booking a place in the third round, where he will play the powerful young Russian Karen Khachanov, the 30th seed.

Related: Andy Murray makes light work of Dustin Brown to go into Wimbledon third round

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2017/jul/05/rafa-nadal-wimbledon-donald-young

Jul 04

‘Bored’ Tomic crashes out of Wimbledon and questions own commitment

• Tomic lost 6-4, 6-3, 6-4 to Mischa Zeverev
• Says critic on social media was ‘on computer making $50 an hour’

Bernard Tomic has admitted that he is “bored” with tennis, no longer cares whether he does well in grand slams, and doubted his motivation to improve after a lifeless straight sets defeat to the No27 seed Mischa Zverev.

The 24-year-old Australian, who reached the quarter-finals at Wimbledon in 2011 and the last 16 in 2016, appeared to lose interest after dropping the first set and went down 6-4, 6-3, 6-4 in just 84 minutes.

Related: Angelique Kerber labours to victory over Irina Falconi at Wimbledon

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jul/04/bernard-tomic-struggling-commitment-bored-wimbledon-tennis

Jul 04

Angelique Kerber flatters to deceive in first-round win over Irina Falconi

• World No1 fails to convince in stuttering 6-4, 6-4 victory
• 2016 runner-up takes 87 minutes to beat unseeded American

Angelique Kerber has spent more weeks on the top of women’s tennis than Venus Williams and Maria Sharapova combined – longer, in fact, than all but 11 players in history. But now, more than ever perhaps, the crown sits precariously on her head.

Related: Wimbledon 2017 day two: Novak Djokovic in action as Kerber wins – live!

Related: Wimbledon as a mother is a whole new ball game, says Victoria Azarenka

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jul/04/angelique-kerber-irina-falconi-wimbledon-womens-singles