Paul MacInnes

Author's details

Name: Paul MacInnes
Date registered: May 15, 2015
URL: http://www.theguardian.com/football/championship

Latest posts

  1. Deceit, determination and Murdoch’s millions: how Premier League was born — July 23, 2017
  2. Anthony Joshua a model of calm as storm clouds gather above Wembley — April 22, 2017
  3. Anthony Joshua rates Tyson Fury a bigger fight than Klitschko showdown — April 19, 2017

Author's posts listings

Jul 23

Deceit, determination and Murdoch’s millions: how Premier League was born

Twenty-five years ago Rick Parry, David Dein and Greg Dyke turned British football on its head. Here the men behind the revolutionary deal relive the story

Rick Parry is showing me the most important document in the recent history of British sport. He has a photo of it on his phone. “Here it is in my handwriting,” he says. “Graham was upstairs, waiting for me to tell him, and I’d forgotten to put FA. So that’s Graham’s writing on the top going ‘by the way, that’s the FA Premier League’.”

“Graham” is Graham Kelly, the former chief executive of the Football Association. In 1991 he hired Parry to help him with a problem. Out of that problem was born a football competition that has become a global brand, a sporting hegemon and a form of soft power for the United Kingdom in the 21st century. But visible even in its totemic “founders’ agreement”, the document on Parry’s phone, were the tensions that would make the Premier League sometimes as reviled as it was beloved.

Related: How the Premier League became a dream destination for young Brazilians

Related: Premier League finances: the full club-by-club breakdown and verdict

We knew we had an airplane on the runway ready to take off, but we didn’t know how high it was going to fly

Related: Dele Alli and Harry Kane expose absurdity of football’s silly season

Get your arse here and blow them out of the water

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/football/2017/jul/23/deceit-determination-murdochs-millions-how-premier-league-was-born

Apr 22

Anthony Joshua a model of calm as storm clouds gather above Wembley

A low-key training base in Sheffield houses a fighter preserving his aggression before Saturday’s WBA title fight against Wladimir Klitschko

At first glance the EIS in Sheffield is just like any other leisure centre. There are mums escorting soggy-haired kids from the pool, couples getting lost looking for the badminton courts, wilting sandwiches for sale at the cafe. No one would guess that upstairs, behind the basketball courts, is the training camp for a world heavyweight champion.

Anthony Joshua has chosen the English Institute of Sport as his base before Saturday’s superfight with Wladimir Klitschko and, no, it’s not just a leisure centre. The EIS is also a high-performance centre for Team GB, where athletes from sports including diving and paralympic table tennis, as well as boxing, are coached and monitored. But that is not to say that the place is flash. In the boxing gym there are four rings, scuffed and bearing faded London 2012 logos. There is a basic gym set, the centrepiece of which is a massive tractor tyre. There are health and safety messages everywhere.

Related: Anthony Joshua: ‘Being a boxer you have to be a man of the people’

Related: Wladimir Klitschko: ‘This may sound arrogant, but I am like Mount Everest’

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/apr/22/anthony-joshua-wba-wladimir-klitschko

Apr 19

Anthony Joshua rates Tyson Fury a bigger fight than Klitschko showdown

• ‘When he returns I’m sure I’ll still be here,’ says former Olympic champion
• Joshua and Klitschko vying for the WBA title vacated by Fury

Anthony Joshua believes Tyson Fury would provide him with his biggest fight as the countdown to his Wembley title bout with Wladimir Klitschko enters its final 10 days.

Related: Wladimir Klitschko: ‘This may sound arrogant, but I am like Mount Everest’

Related: Anthony Joshua: ‘Being a boxer you have to be a man of the people’

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/apr/19/anthony-joshua-tyson-fury-wladimir-klitschko-world-title