Ewan Murray at Erin Hills

Author's details

Name: Ewan Murray at Erin Hills
Date registered: June 13, 2017
URL: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/golf

Latest posts

  1. How US Open champion Brooks Koepka came of age on his European travels | Ewan Murray — June 19, 2017
  2. Brooks Koepka says Dustin Johnson pep talk helped him to US Open win — June 19, 2017
  3. Brooks Koepka holds his nerve in major style to land the US Open title — June 19, 2017
  4. US Open: Thomas makes history before Harman shows Fleetwood how it’s done — June 17, 2017
  5. USGA keeps US Open on Father’s Day but course moves upend golf tradition | Ewan Murray — June 17, 2017

Author's posts listings

Jun 19

How US Open champion Brooks Koepka came of age on his European travels | Ewan Murray

The 27-year-old US champion owes much to his days on the European Challenge Tour, plus, of course, his own desire to sample fresh experiences

When standing in a lay-by on the outskirts of Edinburgh fixing a flat tyre in June 2013, Brooks Koepka could not have dreamed that one day he would win the US Open.

Picture the scene. Koepka, a golfer trying to make his name via the Challenge Tour, has just won the Scottish Hydro Challenge in Aviemore. It is his fourth win on that circuit within 10 months, thereby endorsing the decision to forge his career on the European Tour’s feeder scene rather than continuing with the comforts of Florida. When he won, he won handsomely.

Related: Brooks Koepka holds his nerve in major style to land the US Open title

Related: Brooks Koepka says Dustin Johnson pep talk helped him to US Open win

Related: Rising US star Brooks Koepka does it the hard way to lift European Tour

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/19/us-open-champion-brooks-koepka-european-tour

Jun 19

Brooks Koepka says Dustin Johnson pep talk helped him to US Open win

  • Koepka seals first major after call from defending champion
  • American says experience at Ryder Cup helped boost confidence

Brooks Koepka revealed he received a motivational phone call from the world No1, Dustin Johnson, the night before he became a first-time major winner. Koepka’s four-stroke triumph at Erin Hills on Sunday, at a record-equalling tournament aggregate of 16 under par, means he succeeds Johnson as the US Open champion.

“Dustin actually called me on Saturday night and told me to take one shot at a time, just to stay patient,” Koepka said. “It was a case of ‘just keep doing what you’re doing, you’re going to win the thing. Just don’t get ahead of yourself’.

Related: Brooks Koepka holds his nerve in major style to land the US Open title

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/19/brooks-koepka-us-open-champion-golf-dustin-johnson

Jun 19

Brooks Koepka holds his nerve in major style to land the US Open title

• American wins by four shots from Harman and Matsuyama
• Japanese has best-of-day 66; Britain’s Tommy Fleetwood fourth

Major championships are now the domain of golf’s one-time pretenders. Seven in a row have been claimed by first-time champions, with the conclusion to the 117th US Open developing into a test of nerve for Brooks Koepka. The 27-year-old from Florida became the latest player to deliver on earlier and widely recognised promise.

Koepka – like Jason Day, Danny Willett, Dustin Johnson, Henrik Stenson, Jimmy Walker and Sergio García – is a bridesmaid no more. Even fresh, testing Wisconsin conditions for day four and the weight of history could not halt Koepka as he brilliantly pieced together a 67. Three birdies in a row from the 14th provided the hammer blow to those in pursuit; the eventual margin of victory was four shots, at 16 under par, a record-equalling US Open tally. Brian Harman and Hideki Matsuyama shared second place.

Related: Rising US star Brooks Koepka does it the hard way to lift European Tour

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/19/us-open-2017-champion-brooks-koepka-erin-hills

Jun 17

US Open: Thomas makes history before Harman shows Fleetwood how it’s done

• American Brian Harman leads by one shot at 12 under after round of 67
• Thomas records first nine-under-par round in US Open history

It took until this, the 117th staging of the US Open, for a player to post a round of nine under par in this championship. Step forward Justin Thomas, who marched where even the greats of this sport failed by holing out from eight feet on Erin Hills’s 18th green for an eagle. Unprecedented achievement had been sealed courtesy of a Thomas 63. Yet by close of play, he did not even lead the tournament.

Tommy Fleetwood threatened to set a record of his own, until a stumble at the very location where Thomas excelled. Fleetwood could have been only the second Englishman in 47 years to hold at least a share of the 54-hole lead in a US Open but blundered with a chip then putted over the 18th green when it seemed his hard work had been done. A dropped shot means Fleetwood, at 11 under, shares second with Thomas and Brooks Koepka.

Related: US Open 2017: third round – as it happened

Related: USGA keeps US Open on Father’s Day but course moves upend golf tradition | Ewan Murray

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/17/justin-thomas-makes-us-open-history-as-tommy-fleetwood-falters-on-last

Jun 17

USGA keeps US Open on Father’s Day but course moves upend golf tradition | Ewan Murray

Using a new course in Erin Hills two years after Chambers Bay’s questionable debut hurts the US Open’s identity in a sport where playing in the greats’ footsteps draws us in

Change may be afoot in golf’s calendar but the US Open’s position remains nonnegotiable. The United States Golf Association, in moving towards a series of championships around this time of year, have made it both publicly and privately clear that their biggest one of all will continue to conclude on Father’s Day.

Elsewhere, confirmation may not be slow in arriving that the US PGA Championship will revert to May from 2019; a long-awaited scenario which would have knock-on impacts for both the European and PGA Tours. The US Open, therefore, would become the third rather than the second major of any given year. The Players Championship would become part of the Masters buildup, as was the case in the past.

Related: US Open: Casey and Fleetwood lead British charge as McIlroy misses cut

Related: US Open 2017: second round – as it happened

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2017/jun/17/usga-us-open-golf-new-course-erin-hills

Jun 16

Rory McIlroy sees grounds for optimism despite early US Open exit

• Late run of birdies unable to prevent rusty McIlroy from missing cut
• Paul Casey and Tommy Fleetwood lead English charge

If Rory McIlroy was a racehorse, there would have been no logic at all in ranking him among the favourites for an event of equivalent significance to the US Open. As golf’s version of a performer who is lightly raced, McIlroy arrived at Erin Hills having played only 22 competitive rounds in 2017.

That figure increased by only two, McIlroy’s second-round 71 in the second major of 2017 proving insufficient to improve the damage caused by an opening round of 78. McIlroy at least departed in reasonable spirits, his run of four birdies in six closing holes providing a glance back towards what the four-time major champion is capable of.

Related: US Open 2017: second round – live!

Related: Homicide, jail and debt: the storyline flying under the US Open radar

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/16/us-open-rory-mcilroy

Jun 16

Homicide, jail and debt: the storyline flying under the US Open radar

As Erin Hills stages its first major championship, the course architect Steve Trattner is serving 35 years in jail for murdering his wife

The tragic scenario attached to one of Augusta National’s founding fathers, Clifford Roberts, may be well known but the similarly grim circumstances which form a backdrop to Erin Hills have barely featured in the buildup to the US Open. For obvious reasons, perhaps; this tale of money problems, homicide and a lengthy jail term is hardly in keeping with an upbeat major championship narrative.

Imagery of Roberts remains a constant feature during any Masters week. In September 1977, aged 83 and a year after standing down as the long-term Augusta chairman, he committed suicide on the very premises he played such a major part in establishing.

Related: Rickie Fowler equals US Open record to put himself in hunt for first major

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/16/us-open-e-coli-public-water-fountain-erin-hills

Jun 15

Rickie Fowler equals US Open record to put himself in hunt for first major

• American’s 65 matches all-time score under par for a US Open Thursday
• ‘I’d rather be remembered for something that’s done on a Sunday’

Rickie Fowler was perfectly happy after his record-equalling first round of 65 but he was also of a mind to look well beyond it. Only four players have produced a lower total than the American signed for here and it matched the all-time score under par, seven, for a US Open Thursday. Not a bad start.

Related: US Open 2017: Rory McIlroy and Sergio García begin, Rickie Fowler leads – live!

Related: Pilot being treated for ‘serious burns’ after blimp crash at US Open

Related: US Ryder Cup team may pull out in 2018 over terrorism, worries Tony Jacklin

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/15/rickie-fowler-us-open-history-first-round

Jun 14

USGA eager for only players to take centre stage at US Open this time

• Rules farce hit 2016 event and condition of greens questioned in 2015
• ‘Something like the last couple of years affects our whole organisation’

Those in positions of authority may be soft targets for vociferous abuse but nobody has matched the United States Golf Association’s fuelling of such fires. It is no exaggeration to suggest a peaceful, straightforward US Open from Thursday at Erin Hills is necessary to justify the lofty status as bestowed on those who preside over it. Supposed guardians of the game have proven themselves as figures of ridicule all too often in recent times. By what other means can one explain tournament executives being better known than some competitors?

The rules farce that overshadowed Dustin Johnson’s maiden major win, a year ago at Oakmont, would have been damaging enough for the USGA had it arrived in isolation. Twelve months earlier, the world’s best players had erupted in fury regarding the dreadful condition of greens at Chambers Bay.

Related: US Open: Rory McIlroy happy to take smooth with the rough at Erin Hills

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/14/usga-eager-only-players-take-centre-stage-us-open

Jun 13

US Open: Rory McIlroy happy to take smooth with the rough at Erin Hills

World No2 has not competed since May due to a rib problem but he is ready for the US Open and has been working harder on his short game

In a week when the United States Golf Association will inevitably be in need of allies, a high-profile one arrived in the shape of Rory McIlroy. The world No2 hit back at those fellow US Open competitors who have complained about the rough at Erin Hills – Kevin Na labelled it “unplayable” – by insisting the margins for error remain perfectly fair.

As McIlroy was speaking, the USGA was overseeing the cutting back of dense, tall rough in only a few areas of the course. News of that triggered a rueful smile from the Northern Irishman, who will go in pursuit of a fifth major title from Thursday, and saw little need for such an adjustment.

Related: Dustin Johnson fear factor abates but US Open at Erin Hills worries linger

Continue reading…

Permanent link to this article: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jun/13/us-open-rory-mcilroy-rough-erin-hills-world-no2-short-game